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Different types of Drawing

Updated on May 11, 2011
I did this when I was 16, in my high school sketchbook, if you don't like Reggae much it's Bob Marley
I did this when I was 16, in my high school sketchbook, if you don't like Reggae much it's Bob Marley

A Brief Overview of My Artistic Skills

I recently came across H.C Porter's latest hub 'Just a girl, who likes to draw', we regularly view each other's hubs and have similar interests. From this I was pondering about making a response hub, no wait..I wouldn't regard it a response, more like a mutual appreciation hub because there are certain things she mentions about her experiences in the field of drawing which I have also experienced. I was thinking of a name for the article, I thought of a direct comparison title 'Just a boy, who likes to draw' but that wouldn't describe my personal occurrences within my hobby to the degree which is unique to me.

I wanted to include a variety of media's which I have experience in and mention the circumstances in which I was to create these pieces since I was drawing constantly as a child, received A stars at high school, A at A level examines and went to Art College. I had one teacher who was similar to H.C Porter's who encouraged my expressive side, and one teacher who knew I could do most things she tried to teach so she sent me to deliver notes to other teacher's, saying 'yes Richard's a 'real artist'. I would already fill 3-4 pages of my sketchbook when we were only required to produce 1-2 and only because I enjoyed it.

I always had a distinct liking for drawing people, I've slowed my drawing down a little during the last 5 years so a lot of my drawings I haven't dug out and scanned into my new computer yet. I also took on Graphic Design at university, enjoyed Typography and Painting, and my interests have turned to music and writing of recent years. If we look at famous artists of the past such as Picasso, he could draw people very realistically but turned to Cubism and abstract figures and look how far he got!


Recent sketches of my friend Sarina or 'Saz'
Recent sketches of my friend Sarina or 'Saz'

Onto the main topic!

Ok, so the main title of this article is 'different types of drawing, when most people think of drawing thy have this stereotypical idea of it just being 'graphite pencils' so I am going to show a collection to emphasize the definition. Dictionary.com describes it as so:

–noun

1. the act of a person or thing that draws. 2. a graphic representation by lines of an object or idea, as with a pencil; a delineation of form without reference to color. 3. a sketch, plan, or design, esp. one made with pen, pencil, or crayon. 4. the art or technique of making these.

It mentions in description 2. without reference to colour, but if so how do you describe works made in Pastel, I know many people use the phrase 'Pastel drawing' but I digress.  The latter photo illustrates the widespread view of drawing and that is the graphite pencil portraiture, my one slightly ignorant teacher, said she always thought I'd be suited to illustration but you can't tame a creative soul from exploring different methods of expression.

'Driftwood' and 'Close-up of Bark' studies

'Driftwood' and 'Close-Up of Bark' piece no1
'Driftwood' and 'Close-Up of Bark' piece no1
'Driftwood' and 'Close-Up of Bark' piece no2
'Driftwood' and 'Close-Up of Bark' piece no2
'Driftwood' and 'Close-Up of Bark' piece no3
'Driftwood' and 'Close-Up of Bark' piece no3

 After H.C Porter suggested I put some of my work up I thought to myself we are quite similar in the fact that we both flutter from one style of drawing to another, the above drawing's were created using pencils, water colours and ink. I was also good at Science in school and received A's at High School level for my exams, I was told that Art and Science didn't bond very well(probably meaning in industry), however I believe the latter series of works underwent the same scrutiny and observation a scientist would perform when making studies under a microscope.

More Scientific Studies

Another example of line and proportion work, this was actually done from a model skeleton hanging in our art class at college, the only tools I had for proportion was my hand and a piece of string. It was produced using pencil and charcoal for the toning, it is on a A2 sheet of paper in real life.

Still Life

 This wasn't the most pleasant of days at Art College, A canteen lady was called in to sit for us and we were to use our eye for detail to observe the unique curves this lady was presenting for us. I had a very trained eye, not that I really enjoyed using it for this and happened to notice a dangly tampon string, yuck.. I hope this doesn't get flagged for inappropriate content now, however I think it added to an interesting story. This piece was created using pastels and charcoal on textured paper.

Crab Prints

I particularly like these Crab prints I did via lino-printing, this is where you carve your drawing into the lino material, paint on the colours and press onto paper. It is reminiscent of Keith Haring's drawings which were basically bright colours and lines, so in essence it is a drawing repeated! There was a further red and orange version which was particularly nice, i will try to find it and scan it along with some of my other good portraiture work which is also missing from this article.

To end the article I am going to include one of my recent canvas painting's of Jimi Hendrix, I prefer painting of recently because canvas's are more notably recognised in a gallery setting and I think due to traditional values of art, more respected. As my University director said 'What is drawing, even painting can be described as drawing' it all involves line work, I know when producing portraiture, I sketch a faint outline to ensure I have the proportions correct before I apply the paint layers.

Produced using oils and aerosol
Produced using oils and aerosol
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