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How To Make Miniature Guitars

Updated on July 5, 2016

Miniature Guitars

It's cheap. It's easy. It's engrossing.
It's cheap. It's easy. It's engrossing.

How To Make Miniature Guitars

I love guitars. I'm not just fond of them or have a strong liking for them. I absolutely love them. A never-to-be-satisfied life long love. Were I able to afford it, I would have a museum filled with all the different models and styles. Well-known or otherwise. Alas for me, that is not practical, affordable or possible. To alleviate this unfortunate situation I have used my love of arts and crafts to satisfy my desire. I make my own miniature guitars. I use any material I can get my hands on and in this Hub I will take you through a step by step guide on how to create them.

Step 1

Find some plain card. It doesn't have to be modelling card. It can be an old birthday card or a cereal box, but the more rigid it is the better.
Find some plain card. It doesn't have to be modelling card. It can be an old birthday card or a cereal box, but the more rigid it is the better.

Find some plain card. It doesn't have to be modelling card. It can be an old birthday card or a cereal box, but the more rigid it is the better.

Step 2

Get the cut out part of the main body of the guitar you are making.
Get the cut out part of the main body of the guitar you are making.

What I do here is I choose the guitar I want to make from images on the internet. I then print it off on an A4 piece of paper, with nine of the same image. This way I have a photo of the entire guitar. The rest of the images I can cut out the main body, the neck and the plectrum guard. In this case I am making two miniatures of a Fender Telecaster.

Step 3

Turn the cut out upside down so the guitar front is facing down and shade around the body with pencil.
Turn the cut out upside down so the guitar front is facing down and shade around the body with pencil.

Turn the picture face down on the paper and shade around it with pencil. Do this twice for one guitar or, in our case, four times for two guitars.

Step 3

Now for the neck of the guitar.
Now for the neck of the guitar.

We will do the same procedure for the neck of the guitar. Turn it face down and shade around it with pencil. As you can see my guitar is quite small so this can be a bit tricky.

Step 4

You have to be a bit nimble-fingered but shade around the neck.
You have to be a bit nimble-fingered but shade around the neck.

Step 5

Finally the plectrum guard or pick guard. Whatever you like to call it.
Finally the plectrum guard or pick guard. Whatever you like to call it.

Step 6

Once you have shaded around the cut outs it should look like this.
Once you have shaded around the cut outs it should look like this.

Once each part has been shaded our template should look like this. You cannot draw around the cut outs because when you cut them out of the card they will be too big.

Step 7

Carefully cut the pieces out of the card.
Carefully cut the pieces out of the card.

Very carefully cut the pieces out of the card. It is tricky but if you take your time you will end up with each part as above. As you can see with the neck I haven't been too careful, but it will be okay.

Step 8

Take the four guitar bodies.
Take the four guitar bodies.

Step 9

Get some paper glue and glue them together.
Get some paper glue and glue them together.

In steps 8 and 9, glue the two guitar bodies together. This will make them more rigid. Make sure they are completely dry before moving to the next step. I usually put them under something heavy to make sure they are glued flat together.

Step 10

The two parts glued together may be slightly off because they were cut out seperately.
The two parts glued together may be slightly off because they were cut out seperately.

The two parts maybe off because they were cut out seperately. For this I have a small round file I use to just straighten the edges. Do not file too hard as this will cause the guitar to be misshapen.

Step 11

My little jig.
My little jig.

Next step: I make a little jig which will hold my guitar parts in place. It is just a piece of card with four garden pea size balls of Blu tak. I have found this to be the best stuff to use.

Step 12

Push the guitar parts on to the Blu tak.
Push the guitar parts on to the Blu tak.

Push the guitar parts on to the Blu tak and make sure they do not move or come off.

Step 13

Now for the fun part.
Now for the fun part.

Step 14

Painting the parts.
Painting the parts.

First I paint what will be the back of the guitar. You can paint them whichever colour you want. I chose cream and green (which is like Status Quo, Francis Rossi's Telecaster). I let this dry then turn the parts over. The front of the necks are usually two different colours: The fretboard and the machine head. Again make sure it is all completely dry before moving on to the next step.

Step 15

Glue the plectrum guard onto the front of the guitar and let it dry.
Glue the plectrum guard onto the front of the guitar and let it dry.

Step 16

The guitar pick ups and furniture.
The guitar pick ups and furniture.

Now we come to the guitar pick ups and the furniture. I cut these out based on the photo of the guitar. You can use anything here. Little bits of coloured paper or card. As you can see I have used a silver foil pie container.

Step 17

Using tweezers, I glue the furniture to main body of the guitar.
Using tweezers, I glue the furniture to main body of the guitar.

Step 18

Back to the painting.
Back to the painting.

This is the trickiest part of the whole operation. Painting the minute detail. It needs a very steady hand. You can use a pin to do the small dots and the end of your paint brush to do the volume buttons. Some people use a dentist scraping tool to do it. If you haven't got one you could roll up silver baking foil to use as a make-shift one. Whatever is easiest for you.

Step 20

The final part.
The final part.

For the final part I use super glue to fix the neck to the body. Be careful to get the neck straight and don't glue the guitar to your fingers.

There you have it. A step by step guide of how to make miniature guitars. It's possible to get images of every guitar on the internet. I have little folders with many of them. Brian Jones' plectrum guitar, Angus Youngs Gibson, Brian May, Paul McCartney's bass, Eddie Van Halen, Rory Gallagher, Jimmy Page and Brain Setzers' Gretsch. Now you can have your own miniature guitar museum. Good luck.

How To Make Miniature Guitars

Here are some other examples of my miniature guitars.
Here are some other examples of my miniature guitars.

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    • Buildreps profile image

      Buildreps 11 months ago from Europe

      Wonderful article and so creative. You need a steady hand indeed! Just curious: what brought you into making miniature guitars?

    • villyvacker profile image
      Author

      Billy Turnock 11 months ago from Manchester England

      I made them originally to sell on eBay, in the run up to christmas, as a hanging decoration for xmas trees. I sold them in fours and after christmas as fridge magnets. I don't make a lot, but they always sell and everyone who buys them seems to like them. I just enjoy making them and do them mainly for myself now. Thanks for asking.

    • rebeccamealey profile image

      Rebecca Mealey 11 months ago from Northeastern Georgia, USA

      These are really cute and such and original idea!

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