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Labyrinths for Meditation

Updated on October 13, 2016
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Sadie Holloway teaches communication skills to people who want to build better relationships at home, at work, and out in the community.

Labyrinths have been used for thousands of years, by many cultures around the world, to find inner peace, harmony, and enlightenment. Learn more about this sacred tradition.

Let your mind wander as you follow the labyrinth's path.

Meditative labyrinths can be found both indoors and outdoors.
Meditative labyrinths can be found both indoors and outdoors.

What is a meditative Labyrinth? A meditative Labyrinth is a spiral-like path that loops and curves back on itself. There are no traps or so-called dead-ends in these mazes, only self-discovery and deeper spiritual awareness. Labyrinths have been used by people the world over as a gentle way to pray, to calm the mind, and find deep inner peace.

Walk the slow, spherical path of a sacred Labyrinth to ease stress and nourish your soul.

Walking along a Labyrinth can help soothe mental stress and anxiety caused by an overactive mind. Following the slow, meditative path of an outdoor or indoor Labyrinth is a mindful, relaxing way to deal with turbulance in your life. Walking a Labyrinth can awaken your creative centers in your brain to help you uncover the answers to many of life’s questions.

Labyrinths can be marked on the ground with stones, cut into the lawn in your backyard or drawn in the sand on a beach. Places of worship often paint labyrinths on the floor for their members and visitors to follow as they pray or meditate.

If you’re not able to find and indoor or outdoor Labyrinth in your community to walk along, drawing a tabletop Labyrinth can be just as calming as walking along one, especially in the middle of a hectic work day.

You can also draw a Labyrinth in a small desktop zen garden.

Follow the video below to learn how to draw your own soothing Labyrinth. I find that watching someone else draw a labyrinth is very soothing and meditative.

A pen and paper is all you need to create a tabletop labyrinth that you can use at work or school when you need to relax.
A pen and paper is all you need to create a tabletop labyrinth that you can use at work or school when you need to relax.

What should you use to draw a Labyrinth? Use materials that let your hands move freely while drawing your Labyrinth.

To draw a Labyrinth, select smooth paper and quality drawing materials that facilitate fluid hand movements. For example, trying to use a thick marker on a rough sheet of paper will make your hand movements clunky and clumsy as the pen tip trips across a rough sheet of paper.

Experiment with different inks and papers for drawing your Labyrinth. Ideally, your drawing surface should be quite generous in size so that your hand movements aren't hemmed in by a tight, restricted space. On the other hand, if you only have a small space to work with you can still draw a small Labyrinth in a notebook. In fact, you can draw a Labyrinth almost anywhere---while taking transit to work, while on hold with the cable company, or while sitting in a boring meeting.

How do you meditate?

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When you look at the sun during your walking meditation, the mindfulness of the body helps you to see that the sun is in you; without the sun there is no life at all and suddenly you get in touch with the sun in a different way.

— Thich Nhat Hanh
An early morning walk is a blessing for the whole day. -- Henry David Thoreau
An early morning walk is a blessing for the whole day. -- Henry David Thoreau

© 2014 Sadie Holloway

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  • AliciaC profile image

    Linda Crampton 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada

    I've never thought of drawing a labyrinth as a means of meditation or relaxation. Thanks for the useful suggestion.

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