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How to Crochet Your Own Hogwarts House Scarf

Updated on December 25, 2014

Finished House scarf

Completed Hufflepuff House scarf with tassels.
Completed Hufflepuff House scarf with tassels. | Source
The Hogwarts School coat of arms featuring the four Houses and their colors (Clockwise from top left: Gryffindor with scarlet and gold, Slytherin with green and silver, Hufflepuff with canary yellow and black, and Ravenclaw with blue and bronze)
The Hogwarts School coat of arms featuring the four Houses and their colors (Clockwise from top left: Gryffindor with scarlet and gold, Slytherin with green and silver, Hufflepuff with canary yellow and black, and Ravenclaw with blue and bronze) | Source

BEFORE WE BEGIN...

Readers, I'm going to level with you:

I'm a nerd.

I love books, specifically the Harry Potter books by the lovely J. K. Rowling. For those out there who are unfamiliar with the general story line of the series, here's what you need to know to understand this hub:

  • Harry Potter is a wizard boy who went to wizard school called Hogwarts.
  • The students of Hogwarts School are split up into four smaller groups called Houses.
  • Each House has different colors and mascots.

For the purposes of this hub, we will be crafting the scarf of one of my favorite Houses: Hufflepuff. Students placed into this House are known for their patience, dedication and kindness.

Plus, they've got an awesome badger as their mascot! What's not to love about that?

Enough chit chat.

Let's get started.

MATERIALS

One skein yellow yarn, one skein black yarn, one US size G crochet hook, one pair of scissors.
One skein yellow yarn, one skein black yarn, one US size G crochet hook, one pair of scissors. | Source
item
Why?
How many?
Cost
Yarn
It will be used to make the scarf.
 
Around $2 - $3 per skein (roll). Be sure to check thrift stores and second hand stores for lower prices. Also, look for coupons when shopping at your local craft stores.
Crochet hook
This is the tool we will use to crochet the scarf.
1
Roughly $1 - $3.
Scissors
We will need to cut the yarn periodically as we switch colors while crocheting.
1
About $1 - $3 (though your local dollar store should have them).
Hogwarts House crest patch
Although this part is optional, the House crest will be the finishing touch to our scarf.
1
Around $5 - $6.
Sewing needle
It will be used to attach the House crest
1
Between $1-$2 (although your local dollar store should carry sewing kits with both the needle and thread you'll need)
Thread (General purpose/all purpose)
This will be used to fasten the House crest patch to the completed scarf.
Approx. 3 feet / 1 meter
Between $1-$2 (although your local dollar store should carry sewing kits with both the needle and thread you'll need)

BEFORE WE BEGIN, CONSIDER THIS...

  1. How long do you want your scarf to be? The scarf made following this tutorial will be roughly INSERT LENGTH OF FINISHED SCARF HERE. If you'd like your scarf to be a bit longer, add a few more rows of yellow yarn. If you'd like the finished product to be shorter, end each block of yellow rows early.
  2. Which Hogwarts House scarf do you want to make? Are you a Gryffindor? Or is the Ravenclaw House more fitting? Do you find yourself identifying with Slytherins or do you fancy yourself a Hufflepuff? Your choice will dictate the colors yarn you'll use to make your scarf.

If you're unsure what the colors are for your House...

Hogwarts Houses and their colors

Hogwarts House
Main color
Stripe color
House mascot
Hufflepuff
Canary yellow (or bright yellow)
Black
Badger
Gryffindor
Scarlet
Gold
Lion
Slytherin
Green
Silver
Serpent
Ravenclaw
Blue
Bronze (or a similar shade of brown)
Eagle

Now that you've decided which House you're in and which color yarn you're going to need, it's time to get down to business.

There are a few different types of stitches you'll need to be relatively familiar with to make this scarf. They are:

  • Chain stitch
  • Slip stitch
  • Double crochet

While perusing YouTube, I stumbled across the video below and I feel it does a good job of teaching these stitches.

HOW TO: Chain and slip stitch

HOW TO: Double crochet stitch

HOW TO: Change yarn color at end of row

MAKING YOUR SCARF

  1. Gather the materials you will be working with (yarn, crochet hook, etc.)
  2. You'll be starting with your main color yarn (see the table above if you're not sure which color that is). Pick a skein of this color and find the end.

If you can't seem to find the end of the skein...

Source
Source

3. Chain 27 to begin.

4. Chain 3 more. These 3 extra chain stitches will act as the first double crochet of your next row. Keeping track of those last 3 chains, turn your work over (this means turning your work so that the "back" is now facing you - you'll do this each time you start a new row).

5. Skipping the 3 extra chain stitches, double crochet into the 4th chain. Continue double crocheting once into each chain until you reach the end of the row.

6. Chain 3 pain the end of the row. Now, turn your work over. Once again, the 3 extra chains you just made with act as the first double crochet of your next row.

7. Double crochet once into each chain until you reach the end of the row.

8. Repeat steps 6 and 7 until you have 15 rows.

NOTE: Following these instructions will give you blocks of your main color that are 15 rows If you'd prefer this portion of the scarf to be shorter, try stopping at 12 rows. If a longer block of main color is what you prefer, I suggest stopping at 18 rows. The beauty of crochet is that YOU get to alter your projects to your liking! Feel free to make as many (or as few) rows as you want!

9.Next, switch to your stripe color yarn. For instructions on how to do this, see the video below.

10. Chain 3 and turn your work over.

11. Double crochet to the end of the row. Chain 3. Turn your work over. Double crochet to the end of the row.

12. Switch to your main color yarn. Do 2 rows of double crochets in the same way.

13. Switch to your stripe color yarn. Do 2 rows of double crochets.

14. Switch to your main color yarn. Do the same number of rows of double crochets as you did for the first block of your main color.

15. Repeat steps 9 through 14 until your scarf is a length you like. For my scarf, I worked until it reached 43 inches (just over 1 meter). The width is roughly 7.5 inches (19 cm).

16. When you've completed the final row of double crochets, end the row and weave the loose end back through the final row. For instructions on how to do this, check out the video below.

An example diagram of a completed scarf (minus the House crest patch)

Please note that this is quite a long scarf. Yours does not necessarily need to be this long.
Please note that this is quite a long scarf. Yours does not necessarily need to be this long.

ATTACHING YOUR HOUSE CREST PATCH

Before we begin...

Pick a color of thread that will easily blend in with the crest patch you've chosen. If your patch is of the House crest on a black background, it's best to choose a black thread, as we will be stitching around the edges of the patch and the thread won't stand out. If there is another color that makes up the majority of the space around the perimeter of the patch, I suggest selecting that one.

  1. Thread your needle with the length of thread. Next, bring the two ends of threat together so that the needle hangs in the center. The thread should be folded in two halves.
  2. With the two lengths of thread laying on top of each other, knot them near the loose end.
  3. Select one end of your scarf. Lay the endmost block of your main color on a flat surface. Position the patch in the center of the block. This is where it will be sewn onto the scarf.
  4. Using one hand to keep the patch in place, take the needle (with thread still attached) and move it beneath the scarf and patch.
  5. It may take a bit of force, but push the needle up through both the scarf and patch so that it is piercing the edge of the patch. Pull the needle and thread through the patch, keeping the patch firmly in place. The end of the thread will catch where you made the knot.
  6. Skipping a space of roughly 1 cm (or 0.5 inches) along the edge of the patch, insert the needle back down through the patch and scarf. Pull on the needle until the stitch you've just created is snug.
  7. It is important that you continuously check to make sure the patch is placed in the center of the block of main color yarn. It is likely to shift while you're stitching it onto the scarf.
  8. Repeat steps 5 through 7 until you have worked completely around the perimeter of the patch, securing it snugly to the scarf.
  9. When you complete your final stitch, the needle should be on the underside of the scarf. Turn the scarf over. Take the needle and put it through one of your previous stitches, creating a loop with your thread. Next, put the needle through that loop, pulling until the knot you've just made is tight and flush against the scarf.
  10. Repeat step 9 using the same stitch to make the loop with your thread.
  11. Once you are certain the knots are tight and secure, take your scissors and cut loose the remaining thread and needle. I suggest leaving roughly 1 cm (or 0.5 inches) of thread attached to the back of the scarf.
  12. Pat yourself on the back! You just made a House scarf!

OPTIONAL: ADDING TASSELS TO YOUR SCARF.

  1. Take your main color yarn and cut 13 pieces, each measuring 20 cm (or 8 inches) in length.
  2. Now, take your stripe color yarn and repeat step 1.
  3. Take one strand of each color and lay them together lengthwise.
  4. Next, use your crochet hook to pull one end of the pair of strands through the endmost chain at one end of the scarf.
  5. Fold the pair of strands in half and knot them as close as you can to the scarf. You now have one tassel.
  6. Repeat steps 4 and 5 until you reach the end of the row, skipping one chain in between tassels.
  7. Trim the edges of the tassels to even them out if necessary.
  8. Repeat steps 1 - 7 on the opposite end of the scarf.

Voilà!

DISCLAIMER: Finished product does not provide magical abilities, but it's still pretty awesome.
DISCLAIMER: Finished product does not provide magical abilities, but it's still pretty awesome. | Source

Comments

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    • Ana Koulouris profile imageAUTHOR

      Ana Koulouris 

      3 years ago from Chicago, IL

      Thanks! I do sell scarves and other craft things online. www.etsy.com/TheCraftyWriterShop

    • Ana Koulouris profile imageAUTHOR

      Ana Koulouris 

      3 years ago from Chicago, IL

      Thank you! I did make it! It took about a week from start to finish, though I was working on it here and there when I had a chance.

    • profile image

      Flocks 

      3 years ago

      Love it!!! But I don't crochet one bit. Do you sell them 0nline?

    • spotlight19 profile image

      Jennifer Pena 

      3 years ago from California

      That's awesome:-) did you really make the scarf that is in the picture? and if you did how long did it take you to finish it?

    working

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