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How to Make a Rubber Band Easter Egg Without a Loom

Updated on September 2, 2014
Rubber Band Easter Eggs
Rubber Band Easter Eggs | Source

I recently read this tutorial by Pauleen Potter on Squidoo on how to crochet using rubber bands. Her project for the tutorial was a doll hat, something I was not really keen on doing, since I did not want to risk ruining my doll's hair by having her wear something tight on her head. So, I just read on the technique of making single crochets and filed the technique away for next time.

With Easter holiday approaching, I thought it would be appropriate to use the technique to make a crochet rubber band egg. While the tutorial showed the process using a Rainbow Loom, it is also possible to crochet in Rounds without a loom.

This hub is a tutorial on how to make your own rubber band Easter eggs without a loom. It is a crocheter's project, so knowing someone who can crochet will come in handy.

Rubber Band Easter Egg in Craft Life's Basket
Rubber Band Easter Egg in Craft Life's Basket | Source

Things You Need

1. Find an Easter egg crochet pattern that you like. There are a lot of free crochet patterns available online, just use your favorite search engine and type "free easter egg crochet patterns". For non-crocheters, crochet patterns usually include a gauge for the project. But what exactly is gauge? Gauge determines the size of your project and in regular crochet, depends on the thickness of the yarn and the size of the hook used. Since we are dealing with elastic rubber bands, gauge is determined differently, because rubber bands return to their original shape when tension is no longer applied to it.

So how will you know what size your egg will be? The size will depend on the number of rounds in the pattern as well as the maximum number of stitches in its widest round. For this tutorial, I used the pattern from Crochet Spot by Rachel Choi. In this pattern, there are 13 rounds, with 22 stitches at its widest part (22 sc). The size of the egg I created from it was the right size to fit Craft Life's Basket Tutorial on YouTube. I attached the video on the right, in case you want to make one, too.

2. Any-sized hook. Whether you are a crocheter or a loomer, you can use any hook you have on hand. I used the plastic hook from my Rainbow Loom to make this tutorial since it was stored with my rubber bands, but any other hook will do.

3. Rubber bands. Since rubber band crafts are quite popular right now, colorful rubber bands are now available in a lot of places - toy stores, department stores, craft stores, etc. If, however, you prefer to buy rubber bands in bulk or in the comfort of your own home, they are also available in Amazon.com.

One of the things I always want to know when working with rubber bands is, just how many will I need to complete the project? You will need a little bit of math for this, but I have written down the formula to make it easier for you. In order to find out how many rubber bands you need for your Easter egg, check your pattern and look for the number of stitches in each Round located at the end of each line. Here is a quick formula on how to find the total bands you need:

Total Bands Needed = Sum (Number of Stitches Per Round) + Number of Rounds.

So, for the pattern I used in this tutorial:

Total Bands Needed = (6 + 9 + 12 + 15 + 19 + 19 + 22 + 22 + 22 + 22 + 19 + 14 + 7) + 13 = 221.

If you want to make a striped egg, you will need this number per color:

One Stripe = Number of Stitches in the Round + 1.

This formula does not apply for the first round only, since you can use a different colored cap band in the beginning.

4. Polyester fiberfill or stuffing. For my Easter eggs, I used polyester fiberfill to stuff them and give them shape. However, the fiberfill sticks out of the holes in mine, so I suggest using something else (toilet paper, maybe) to avoid having the same problem.

How to Make a Rubber Band Easter Egg

Note: While following this tutorial, make sure you have a separate tab open for your crochet pattern to take note how many stitches you need to do for each Round. Throughout this part, I will be using Rachel Choi's pattern from Crochet Spot.

  • Count the number of stitches required for the first Round. The pattern says 6 single crochet (sc). Since Pauleen Potter's tutorial did 6 sc for the first Round, just do Steps 2-3 as is.

How to Start Your Easter Egg

Click thumbnail to view full-size
The order in which you place the rubber bands does not matter. Just make sure you hook the bands to their proper positions from top to bottom to get the desired outcome.You can also do this step without a loom. Just insert 6 rubber bands one at a time through a cap band (double or triple loop) to get the same result.Here is a quick look on how 2 bands will look like when inserted through the cap band.
The order in which you place the rubber bands does not matter. Just make sure you hook the bands to their proper positions from top to bottom to get the desired outcome.
The order in which you place the rubber bands does not matter. Just make sure you hook the bands to their proper positions from top to bottom to get the desired outcome. | Source
You can also do this step without a loom. Just insert 6 rubber bands one at a time through a cap band (double or triple loop) to get the same result.
You can also do this step without a loom. Just insert 6 rubber bands one at a time through a cap band (double or triple loop) to get the same result. | Source
Here is a quick look on how 2 bands will look like when inserted through the cap band.
Here is a quick look on how 2 bands will look like when inserted through the cap band. | Source
  • Just follow your pattern by making the same number of stitches as indicated in each Round. For the photos below, I used a different pattern so the stitch counts are different, but the steps are the same. I had to scrap the egg because it came out much too big for the basket.
  • When making the second Round, the pattern calls for 9 sc (instead of 12 from the tutorial). To do this, just follow your crochet pattern by doing (2 sc, 1 sc) around instead of working 2 sc in each sc around.

How to Follow the Pattern

Click thumbnail to view full-size
Second Round done. Total stitches: 12.Second Round joined together to go to the Third Round. This new color does not count as a stitch, so you will have to use the same sc to make your first sc of the Round.Third Round done. Total stitches: 12.
Second Round done. Total stitches: 12.
Second Round done. Total stitches: 12. | Source
Second Round joined together to go to the Third Round. This new color does not count as a stitch, so you will have to use the same sc to make your first sc of the Round.
Second Round joined together to go to the Third Round. This new color does not count as a stitch, so you will have to use the same sc to make your first sc of the Round. | Source
Third Round done. Total stitches: 12.
Third Round done. Total stitches: 12. | Source
  • Then just continue following the pattern. You can now see that it resembles regular crochet now, and should be quite easy to do the rest of the pattern.
  • Once you reach the part with decreasing stitches, there were no steps included in the tutorial for doing a decreasing sc. Here is how I did mine:

How to do a Decrease Sc Stitch

Click thumbnail to view full-size
Pull the rubber band through the loop as usual. But do not get the rubber band at the back just yet.Insert your hook through the next sc first before grabbing the loop at the back.Do the same steps as sc to finish the decreasing stitch.
Pull the rubber band through the loop as usual. But do not get the rubber band at the back just yet.
Pull the rubber band through the loop as usual. But do not get the rubber band at the back just yet. | Source
Insert your hook through the next sc first before grabbing the loop at the back.
Insert your hook through the next sc first before grabbing the loop at the back. | Source
Do the same steps as sc to finish the decreasing stitch.
Do the same steps as sc to finish the decreasing stitch. | Source
  • Remember to stuff your egg when the pattern calls for it. As you can see in some of the photos, my fiberfill was poking out of the holes, so use something you can easily find around the house, like tissue or cotton balls instead.
  • Once you reach the end, you need to sew the bottom close. Here is another set of slides to help you with this step:

How to Sew the Egg Close

Click thumbnail to view full-size
How to close off the ends. Insert your hook in the first sc of the last Round.You can use a similar color, but for the sake of this tutorial, I used a different colored band. Do the same steps to make an sc. This will join the two ends of the Round together.Weave in the last band through each sc, much like when sewing an amigurumi closed.Here is a look at the bottom of the egg. In the egg on the right, a white band was used to sew it close.
How to close off the ends. Insert your hook in the first sc of the last Round.
How to close off the ends. Insert your hook in the first sc of the last Round. | Source
You can use a similar color, but for the sake of this tutorial, I used a different colored band. Do the same steps to make an sc. This will join the two ends of the Round together.
You can use a similar color, but for the sake of this tutorial, I used a different colored band. Do the same steps to make an sc. This will join the two ends of the Round together. | Source
Weave in the last band through each sc, much like when sewing an amigurumi closed.
Weave in the last band through each sc, much like when sewing an amigurumi closed. | Source
Here is a look at the bottom of the egg. In the egg on the right, a white band was used to sew it close.
Here is a look at the bottom of the egg. In the egg on the right, a white band was used to sew it close. | Source

Have fun crafting your own Easter eggs to celebrate the holiday. It is rather sturdy, so you can always reuse it again next year for another Easter egg hunt.

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