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How to draw two point perspective

Updated on September 4, 2012
Start with a simple vertical line
Start with a simple vertical line

In this tutorial you will learn how to draw in two point perspective. This is a simple method and it will allow you to draw in realistic perspective.

With two point perspective you can draw the same objects as in one point perspective but now you'll have an edge of the object closest to the picture plane rather than a face. In other words, you can now create figures in more different angles.

Let's try drawing the box we did in the previous tutorial.
Draw your horizon line, but, instead of marking one vanishing point at the center, mark two points apart from each other (don’t make the point to close to each other, or your draw can get distorted).
Now, below the horizon line, draw a vertical line. This kind of perspective differs from one point perspective because it never has horizontal lines, but you will see how things will look pretty good.

Now the orthogonal lines converge to different vanishing points
Now the orthogonal lines converge to different vanishing points

Draw the orthogonal lines from the top and the bottom of the vertical line reaching the vanishing points.

Vertical lines are vertical
Vertical lines are vertical

Make two more vertical lines to give your object the dimensions you wish. From the top of the last lines, draw an imaginary one reaching the opposite vanishing points.

You don't really have to draw the back of your object if you don't need to
You don't really have to draw the back of your object if you don't need to

Now, close your object by drawing along the orthogonal lines. Erase the back of your object and you now have a box drawn in two point perspective.
Although it's a simple box as the one we made in the previous tutorial, this one has a different view point.

Learn different angles with simple shapes
Learn different angles with simple shapes

With the same two vanishing points, draw multiple figures just to learn the how the perspective behaves from different angles.

Everything starts with simple shapes
Everything starts with simple shapes

Let's draw a chair

Make an object that looks like the one in the picture. We will build the chair from here.

Don't rush. Draw slowly and check how things progress
Don't rush. Draw slowly and check how things progress

Now, from the closest edge, draw down a vertical line until you reach the size you want the legs to be.
Draw two orthogonal lines to the vanishing points and you can make the size of the left and right legs. From there, draw 2 more imaginary lines and you’ll get the size of the last leg.

Vanishing lines that are to close to one another can get a bit confusing
Vanishing lines that are to close to one another can get a bit confusing

Determine how large you want the legs to be and draw it on the closest leg. Proceed creating the orthogonal lines as shown in the picture, so you can finish the front legs and half of the back legs. The back legs are connected to the back of the chair, so we’ll leave them to the next step.

Although imaginary lines are necessary, they can sometimes get a bit confusing
Although imaginary lines are necessary, they can sometimes get a bit confusing

From the right leg, draw a vertical line until it reaches the size that you want for the back of your chair. Connecting orthogonal lines to the vanishing points will allow you to finish it.

Don't throw away old drawings. They will help you check your progress over time
Don't throw away old drawings. They will help you check your progress over time

Ok, almost finished. From the top right orthogonal line, draw a vertical line all the way down to the bottom orthogonal. Now you’ll just have to draw the last imaginary line from the right leg to the left vanishing point and it will allow you to draw the depth of the back legs of your chair.
Erase all the lines that you don’t need and all you’ll have remaining is a chair drawn in a two point perspective.
Hope you had fun.
The more details you want to make, the more imaginary lines you’ll need. But, as you are drawing, you can erase the ones that you won’t need anymore.

Some tips

  • Use a ruler if you can’t draw straight lines very well. With practice, you’ll start to use it fewer times.
  • If you are using pencils, use the harder ones (H) to make the imaginary lines, and the softer pencils (HB/B) for the object outlines.
  • Practice makes it better. Start from simple shapes and give them details. After drawing singular objects, try drawing a full scene, like a room or a street.
  • Further objects look smaller than the closer ones.

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    • tanyasays76 profile image

      tanyasays76 4 years ago

      I haven't thought about much else since I read it. I will be putting the rules to the test on my next project. Thank you!

    • pcabral profile image
      Author

      Pedro Alexandre Furtado Cabral 4 years ago from Azores

      tanyasays76 Thank you for the compliment. I always say that everyone can draw, even if they never did it earlier. I'm glad that it helped you :)

    • tanyasays76 profile image

      tanyasays76 4 years ago

      This is the most useful tutorial for sketching that I have found lately. You are great at instruction. I have had issues with my dimensional sketches, and this helps a lot. Thank you for the hub post :)