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Impressionist Art Painters

Updated on April 3, 2013
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James Watkins is an entrepreneur, musician, and writer. James enjoys people, music, film, and books. He is a lifelong student of history.

IMPRESSIONISTS

The Impressionists were painters who were determined to free themselves from the constraints of tradition, and the art establishment of Paris. The works of the Impressionists both puzzled the public and offended the critics of their day. Only decades later would these artists be vindicated by history. The Impressionists attempted to capture the physical reality of the moment, or at least their impression of it. They painted what they saw.

"JALAIS HILL, PONTOISE" BY CAMILLE PISSARRO IN 1867 (METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART, NEW YORK)
"JALAIS HILL, PONTOISE" BY CAMILLE PISSARRO IN 1867 (METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART, NEW YORK)
CAMILLE PISSARRO & HIS WIFE IN 1877
CAMILLE PISSARRO & HIS WIFE IN 1877

CAMILLE PISSARRO

Camille Pissarro (1830-1903) was born in the Virgin Islands; he moved to Paris when he was 12 years old. Pissarro conveyed his vision of French life in both urban and rural settings. He sold very few paintings while he was alive, but today his works command millions of dollars apiece. He is considered a loyal patriarch of the Impressionist painting movement.

"MADAME MONET IN A JAPANESE COSTUME" BY CLAUDE MONET IN 1875 (MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS, BOSTON)
"MADAME MONET IN A JAPANESE COSTUME" BY CLAUDE MONET IN 1875 (MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS, BOSTON)
CLAUDE MONET 1899
CLAUDE MONET 1899

CLAUDE MONET

Claude Monet (1840-1926) is considered by most as the man who founded, named, and best represents Impressionist painting. Monet was determined to capture the essence of a moment in time. He transports us to a magical place that is real, but that in essence is not real at all. This is especially true in his later works after most of his friends had long since passed from this world.

"GIRL AT THE DANCE" BY BERTHE MORISOT IN 1875 (MUSEE MARMOTTAN MONET, PARIS)
"GIRL AT THE DANCE" BY BERTHE MORISOT IN 1875 (MUSEE MARMOTTAN MONET, PARIS)
BERTHE MORISOT AS PAINTED BY EDOUARD MANET
BERTHE MORISOT AS PAINTED BY EDOUARD MANET

BERTHE MARISOT

Berthe Marisot (1841-1895) was first a good friend, and then later the sister-in-law of Edouard Manet, whom I covered extensively in my previous Hub about Impressionism Art. Marisot primarily painted portraits, domestic scenes and landscapes. Her work was not as appreciated as it should have been because she was a woman.

"LUNCHEON OF THE BOATING PARTY" BY PIERRE AUGUSTE RENOIR IN 1881 (THE PHILLIPS COLLECTION, WASHINGTON DC)
"LUNCHEON OF THE BOATING PARTY" BY PIERRE AUGUSTE RENOIR IN 1881 (THE PHILLIPS COLLECTION, WASHINGTON DC)
PIERRE AUGUSTE RENOIR
PIERRE AUGUSTE RENOIR

PIERRE AUGUSTE RENOIR

Pierre Auguste Renoir (1841-1919) is my personal favorite of the Impressionist painters. Renoir was unequaled at portraying what all men love about women and unparalleled at painting apparel. One of his paintings is featured in my Hub Art in my Home; it sold for $78M. Despite contracting arthritis at age 49, he continued to paint and by the time of his demise had created thousands of works of art.

"THE POTATO EATERS" BY VINCENT VAN GOGH IN 1885 (VAN GOGH MUSEUM, AMSTERDAM)
"THE POTATO EATERS" BY VINCENT VAN GOGH IN 1885 (VAN GOGH MUSEUM, AMSTERDAM)
VINCENT VAN GOGH AT AGE 13
VINCENT VAN GOGH AT AGE 13

VINCENT VAN GOGH

Vincent Van Gogh (1853-1890) was a Dutch painter who battled mental illness for most of his life, and committed suicide at the age of 37 with a pistol. Van Gogh is technically considered to be a post-Impressionist painter. He criticized the Impressionists who preceded him as both superficial and sloppy. His later works are considered his best, and It seems that the crazier he got the better he painted.

"WOMAN IN A BATH" BY EDGAR DEGAS IN 1886 (HILL-STEAD MUSEUM, FARMINGTON, CONNECTICUT)
"WOMAN IN A BATH" BY EDGAR DEGAS IN 1886 (HILL-STEAD MUSEUM, FARMINGTON, CONNECTICUT)
EDGAR DEGAS SELF PORTRAIT
EDGAR DEGAS SELF PORTRAIT

EDGAR DEGAS

Edgar Degas (1834-1917) had little interest in landscape themes. He chose to paint people, especially women, and in particular ballerinas. Degas abhorred the term Impressionist and wanted to be known as a Realist. He once lived in New Orleans for a year; was an excellent draftsman and sculptor; and later in life became a photographer as well.

"A SUNDAY AFTERNOON ON THE ISLAND OF LA GRANDE JATTE" BY GEORGES SEURAT IN 1886 (ART INSTITUTE OF CHICAGO)
"A SUNDAY AFTERNOON ON THE ISLAND OF LA GRANDE JATTE" BY GEORGES SEURAT IN 1886 (ART INSTITUTE OF CHICAGO)
GEORGES SEURAT IN 1888
GEORGES SEURAT IN 1888

GEORGES SEURAT

Georges Seurat (1859-1891) is sometimes called a neo-Impressionist. Seurat certainly exhibited an original style featuring dots rather than brush stokes in his most famous work, which is featured above. He had a deep appreciation for decorative color schemes, which could be considered antithetical to the ideals of the Impressionists.  I consider him the father of pointillism. 

"BEDROOM AT ARLES" BY VINCENT VAN GOGH IN 1888 (VAN GOGH MUSEUM, AMSTERDAM)
"BEDROOM AT ARLES" BY VINCENT VAN GOGH IN 1888 (VAN GOGH MUSEUM, AMSTERDAM)
"THE SCREAM" BY EDWARD MUNCH IN 1893 (THE NATIONAL GALLERY, OSLO)
"THE SCREAM" BY EDWARD MUNCH IN 1893 (THE NATIONAL GALLERY, OSLO)
EDVARD MUNCH IN 1921
EDVARD MUNCH IN 1921

EDVARD MUNCH

Edvard Munch (1863-1944) is a Norwegian artist who created one of the most famous paintings in the world today, featured above. Munch was the son of a priest who became a bawdy boozer and brawler. He once said “I do not believe in the art which is not the compulsive result of Man’s urge to open his heart.” I consider him to be the forerunner of Expressionistic painting.

"THE BOATING PARTY" BY MARY CASSATT IN 1894 (NATIONAL GALLERY OF ART, WASHINGTON DC)
"THE BOATING PARTY" BY MARY CASSATT IN 1894 (NATIONAL GALLERY OF ART, WASHINGTON DC)
MARY CASSATT SELF PORTRAIT
MARY CASSATT SELF PORTRAIT

MARY CASSATT

Mary Cassatt (1844-1926) is an American Impressionist art painter. The fact that she was born into a wealthy family was the only reason that Cassatt was able to pursue her chosen career as a painter against the tide of opinion that being an artist was somehow not suitable for women. She specialized in painting women in social settings, and with their children.

"BRANCH OF THE SEINE NEAR GIVENCHY" BY CLAUDE MONET IN 1897 (MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS, BOSTON)
"BRANCH OF THE SEINE NEAR GIVENCHY" BY CLAUDE MONET IN 1897 (MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS, BOSTON)
"STILL LIFE WITH APPLES AND ORANGES" BY PAUL CEZANNE IN 1900 (MUSEE D'ORSAY, PARIS)
"STILL LIFE WITH APPLES AND ORANGES" BY PAUL CEZANNE IN 1900 (MUSEE D'ORSAY, PARIS)
PAUL CEZANNE IN 1861
PAUL CEZANNE IN 1861

PAUL CEZANNE

Paul Cezanne (1839-1906) was a highly emotional man on a quest to make Impressionism "solid and durable."  Cezanne considered the portrayal of everyday objects in art to be important.   He was very much into the forms of nature, and is quoted as saying "When I judge art, I take my painting and put it next to a God-made object like a tree or flower. If it clashes, it is not art."

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    • profile image

      Minerva 3 years ago

      Wow! Great to find a post knocnikg my socks off!

    • James A Watkins profile image
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      James A Watkins 5 years ago from Chicago

      Dolores Monet— I am not aware of that program but I love those English period pieces. I'll have to look for it.

      Thank you for visiting my gallery. I love landscape paintings, too. I surely appreciate your comments. :-)

      James

    • Dolores Monet profile image

      Dolores Monet 5 years ago from East Coast, United States

      HI, James - I have always loved Impressionist landscape paintings. Last year, I stumbled on a British TV show called "Lark Rise to Candleford" a series set in late 19th century England. I fell in love with it. Then I realized that the show often features scenes that look like Impressionist landscapes - it was so beautiful!

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      James A Watkins 6 years ago from Chicago

      anderson_weli— Thank you very much! Welcome to the Hub Pages Community! :D

    • anderson_weli profile image

      anderson_weli 6 years ago

      Very good. Is worth studying. keep it up

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      James A Watkins 7 years ago from Chicago

      mysterylady 89— I absolutely love Don McLean's song "Vincent." Wonderfully beautiful. I will take your advice. Thank you and you are welcome. Also, welcome to the Hub Pages Community!

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      mysterylady 89 7 years ago from Florida

      If you have a large collection of slides - or an art book - on Van Gogh, try playing a recording of Don McLean's "Vincent" as you look through the paintings. I used to do this for my Humanities classes, and it was very moving. Your Hub brought back many memories. Thanks!

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      James A Watkins 7 years ago from Chicago

      Betty Reid— I'm glad that you appreciated this Hub. Yes, the Monet is funny and fascinating. :-)

    • Betty Reid profile image

      Betty Reid 7 years ago from Texas

      I'm glad you put this hub together. The more I see of Monet's work, the more I like it. That "Madame Monet in a Japanese Costume" is pretty funny.

    • James A Watkins profile image
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      James A Watkins 7 years ago from Chicago

      SilverGenes— You're welcome. Thank you for your fine comments. I appreciate the visit. Welcome to the Hub Pages Community!

    • profile image

      SilverGenes 7 years ago

      It's been many years since art school and this has reminded me of why I loved it so much. Thank you. I'll be back :-)

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      James A Watkins 7 years ago from Chicago

      nikki1--- Well, thank you. I'm glad you do. :D

    • nikki1 profile image

      nikki1 7 years ago

      Love your artwork : )

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      James A Watkins 7 years ago from Chicago

      dara--- In MIchigan? I am simply taking some time in the woods to reflect on my life and where I should go next. A bit of time to meditate.

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      James A Watkins 7 years ago from Chicago

      dara--- Thank you, my dear. I am considering becoming a hermit. My first thought was to become a monk but I don't think any monastery would have me. :-) I'm not sure about the dream--nightmare might be more like it. :D

      I so love your words on this page. You are truly a beautiful person. And always have been.

    • James A Watkins profile image
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      James A Watkins 7 years ago from Chicago

      dara--- I will email you the photo and my snail mail address. It will be fun to out together a Hub of your fine art. :)

    • profile image

      dara 7 years ago

      What is going on in Michigan?

    • profile image

      Dara 7 years ago

      James, I wish you healing, health and strength during your sabbatical and challenging times.

      My memories are so clear of you, at that time in my life, and because I saw you...you are like Cezanne and in my heart.You were and still are a dream to me.

      At this age I am very good at oppressing thoughts, feelings and intuition... as society tells us to do....aren't we all? What is hard is knowing and not being brainwashed. But, what is so beautiful is: our heart remains, tattered and worn but, we still can love and hope and feel the beauty of life.

      There is a question to ask you in here some where.

    • profile image

      dara 7 years ago

      Well OK I am flirting a little but true thoughts can not be oppressed forever my friend and all in fun and respect really.

      I would love to email a CD but since I am still on dial-up out here in the woods my best bet would be to use the snail mail. I had your address but, recently lost some pappers and such. Would you email your PO to dara@daradaniel.com

      Thanks. No I do not need an original.

    • James A Watkins profile image
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      James A Watkins 7 years ago from Chicago

      dara--- You're not flirting!? Now I'm disappointed! :-)

      If you prefer a CD to email sure, that will be fine. I am in Michigan for a bit on a sabbatical. If you want to mail a CD drop me an email and I will send you an address. I do have a photo I think will be OK. I never found the one I really wanted but this one will do. I'll get it scanned--or do you need the original?

      I do love pistachios and my mac and cheese--still today. :D Boy, you have a long memory.

      I love you too

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      dara 7 years ago

      Gosh, your are sweet and... right on James Brown. I still love his stuff just like I still love your stuff..no worries I am not flirting ...just stating a fact.

      I am ready! But,how should I do this? Should I just send you a CD of my best stuff with my revised bio/statement(always a work in progress) and updated resume. I can handle that if that is alright with you. Did you find that photo of your handsome self...then and forever...I think you are one of those guys that becomes more distinguished as they get older...but, still eating Pistachios and Mac and Cheese(not together of course).

      Luv Ya.

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      James A Watkins 7 years ago from Chicago

      dara--- You are? You do? I love your first paragraph. And your whole comment speaks with the soul of an artist. I think I'm ready to feature your work in a Hub next week if you're ready.

      I do love that landscape by Pissarro. I have long wondered what that figure is on Mdme. Monet's dress. James Brown said "It's a man's world." :D

      "The Luncheon" is one of my favorite all time paintings. Thank you for visiting me and leaving your words here for me to savor.

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      dara 7 years ago

      I am still trying to free myself from constraints of tradition. In addition, I want to capture a moment of time. A time of awareness when my consciousness pays attention to the oneness of being with nature.

      More specific comments on:

      Poor Camille Pissarro...I feel his pain and the “Jalais Hill, Pontoise”, is fascinating and so worthy of recognition.

      Claude Monet's Japanese Costume Lady has a HuthiGooGuy ...or something like that... upon her attire.

      But, I find the most beautiful of all these paintings at the moment to be his Dancer

      I am happy to see the lovely and so worthy impressionist painters Mary Cassatt and Bethe Marisot.

      I myself have found, regardless of my interest, endeavors and/or occupation, it is a man's world out there.

      Paul Cezanne is in my heart.

      Renoir's “The Luncheon” makes me want to be an aristocrat...not really.

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      James A Watkins 7 years ago from Chicago

      marieryan--- Welcome to HubPages! Thank you for reading my work and for your nice compliments.

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      Marie Ryan 7 years ago from Andalusia, Spain

      This was a really informative article, and so well-presented.Congratulations!

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      James A Watkins 7 years ago from Chicago

      stars439--- Thank you, brother. I appreciate you. I'll be over to read your Hubs soon. God Bless You!

    • stars439 profile image

      stars439 7 years ago from Louisiana, The Magnolia and Pelican State.

      Magnificent art and your knowledge of art is superb. God Bless You.

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      James A Watkins 7 years ago from Chicago

      mdlawyer--- I am glad you find it so. Thank you for letting me know. I appreciate this visit by you.

    • mdlawyer profile image

      mdlawyer 7 years ago

      Your hub is very fascinating indeed!

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      James A Watkins 7 years ago from Chicago

      50 Caliber--- I love old photography. Pissarro does kind of remind me of you, now that you mention it. That picture does speak volumes. He looks like a cool cat. An artist look. I'm glad you found that shot so interesting. So did I.

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      James A Watkins 7 years ago from Chicago

      dohn121--- You are right on time, my friend. I had not heard that Hemingway quote before. Thanks for sharing that interesting tidbit. Thank you for your compliments and you are most welcome.

    • 50 Caliber profile image

      50 Caliber 7 years ago from Arizona

      James,

      I really like old photography and the photo of Pissaro and His wife from 1877 I saved so I could use the picture viewer on XP to increase the size and look at the detail of the clothing and especially the boot style. He dresses with my kind of style! :D I noticed that he really liked those riding boots as the right boot has worn through the sole stitching and has a flap hanging down which may be a statement as to the wealth at the time or he's like me he wears every thing out before either getting it mended or replacing the Item. Any way I really liked that choice for a picture it speaks volumes as to the era and style.

    • dohn121 profile image

      dohn121 7 years ago from Hudson Valley, New York

      I really regret not coming to enjoy this hub sooner, James. What a wonderful presentation (a real work of art?) I can't pick my favorite painter here as it would not at all be fair (or possible for that matter). Once Hemingway stated that he wanted to "Write the way Cezanne painted." I can now see why. Thank you so much for sharing this, James!

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      James A Watkins 7 years ago from Chicago

      peacenhim--- I am surely glad you did. Thanks for visiting and letting me know you enjoyed this one. And you are welcome, too.

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      peacenhim 7 years ago

      Thoroughly enjoyed the Art tour and history! Thanks!

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      James A Watkins 7 years ago from Chicago

      reddog1027--- Thank you very much. I am glad you enjoyed it. Thanks for letting me know that you did.

    • reddog1027 profile image

      reddog1027 7 years ago from Atlanta, GA

      Another great hub about some of my favorite artists.

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      James A Watkins 7 years ago from Chicago

      Tammy Lochmann--- You are surely welcome. I'm glad you enjoyed the gallery. I very much appreciate your visit and your comments.

    • James A Watkins profile image
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      James A Watkins 7 years ago from Chicago

      50 Caliber--- Thank you, my friend. I think you are right about the "Scream" being used for Night Gallery instead of Twilight Zone. I also am more into individual works than artist themselves per-se. Some artists only create one or two great works but that is enough to achieve immortality. You are welcome.

    • Tammy Lochmann profile image

      Tammy Lochmann 7 years ago

      Impressionist art has always been my favorite. Monet and Degas on the top of my list. I got to visit the Met when I was in high school, I only appreciate the fact that I got to visit these places now that I am grown up. Thanks for sharing. The pictures are beautiful!

    • 50 Caliber profile image

      50 Caliber 7 years ago from Arizona

      James,

      another fine hub. I believe "the Scream" was used in the series "Night Gallery" and Rod Serling was the host. I like Monet followed by Van Gogh, probably the best if I had to choose in generality. Mostly I really go by the individual work. This hub takes me back to college years where I had to take the arts for required courses. I dreaded it, I remember well, as I was surprised by actually ending up liking it, along with music appreciation and being introduced to these things. The professor linked some of the works to exposure of things like TV shows and cartoons, making point that we were already possessing knowledge on the subject but we just didn't know it. He was right. Thanks for stirring the old noggin into memory!

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      James A Watkins 7 years ago from Chicago

      dusanotes--- Wonderful! I am well pleased that you liked it, brother. Thanks and you are welcome, Don.

      James

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      James A Watkins 7 years ago from Chicago

      Rose West--- I am so glad you did! Degas surely had style and flair and loved ballerinas. Thank you very much for the visit and the comments.

    • dusanotes profile image

      dusanotes 7 years ago from Windermere, FL

      An absolutely captivating Hub. Thanks, James

      Don White

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      Rose West 7 years ago from Michigan

      I loved all the paintings and your explanations! Degas's ballerinas are some of my favorite works of art. There is something magical about them. You make me want to go ramble through a museum with marble floors!

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      James A Watkins 7 years ago from Chicago

      Tom Whitworth--- The painting by Monet you mentioned is my favorite of these as well. I was waiting to see if anyone else mentioned it. And you have! Thank you!

      I believe you are right about "The Scream."

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      James A Watkins 7 years ago from Chicago

      Pamela99--- Thank you for your fine compliments. I'll bet that exhibit was something. I appreciate this visit from you. :)

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      James A Watkins 7 years ago from Chicago

      IslandVoice--- I saw that documentary also and I loved it! 5 stars. "Luncheon of the Boating Party" is a great print to have and behold. I'll keep it going as long as I'm able. I appreciate your support.

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      James A Watkins 7 years ago from Chicago

      Wealthmadehealthy--- You are quite welcome. If the pics made you happy after your art studies then I must have done something right. Thanks for letting me know. I appreciate the visit.

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      James A Watkins 7 years ago from Chicago

      advisor4qb--- I'm glad you do! I enjoyed producing it. Philosophy was my favorite class in high school. I don't remember us having a class called Humanities way back then. :D

      Thanks for coming!

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      Tom Whitworth 7 years ago from Moundsville, WV

      James,

      I think I like Branch of the Seine by Monet best of those you displayed here.

      Wasn't The Scream by Munch used in the intro of a Rod Serling show?

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      Pamela Oglesby 7 years ago from United States

      James, Beautiful art and good information. impressionist have always been by favorite. I saw a fantastic Monet exhibit at the Atlanta High Museum of Art a few years ago and was just awed. There were several other artists represeted as well. Great hub.

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      Sylvia Van Velzer 7 years ago from Hawaii

      James, you know I watched "The Impressionists" 3 part BBC movie, and was totally smittened by these men/women's work, and very interesting lives. You are one art writer and you know how to showcase and highlight your subjects. I have to say i haven't seen Claude Monet's "Madame Monet In A Japanese Costume". Duh, where have i been? Fyi, we have a large print of Renoir's "Luncheon of the Boating Party". Keep it going!

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      Wealthmadehealthy 7 years ago from Somewhere in the Lone Star State

      Ah the greats. Van Gogh, Cezanne, Monet....Picasso (of a different style, but one of my favorites) Having taken many many years of art, I know them all....Painting styles are so different, as different as each of us....and this was a really interesting hub....Thanks for all the pics in here!!!

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      advisor4qb 7 years ago from On New Footing

      I love this stuff. Everytime I read a hub like this I have Humanities flashbacks. THAT was my favorite class. I took Humanities I and II AND Philosophy!

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      James A Watkins 7 years ago from Chicago

      Lily Rose--- I simply guessed and I am glad I guessed right! :D

      I am happy you enjoyed it. Thanks for coming and you are welcome, too.

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      Lily Rose 7 years ago from East Coast

      How'd you know that these are some of my favorite artists! I really enjoyed this - thanks, James!

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      James A Watkins 7 years ago from Chicago

      creativeone59--- You are totally welcome, my dear. Thanks for coming. I am glad you enjoyed it.

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      James A Watkins 7 years ago from Chicago

      partison patriot--- It's nice to hear from you again. I'll have to get over and read your latest works. You are welcome. I'm well pleased that you enjoyed the art.

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      James A Watkins 7 years ago from Chicago

      eovery--- You know, I am the same way. I am surely no expert on art or anything else. But I do know art I love the minute I see it.

      I'll keep on as long as I'm able! :-)

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      James A Watkins 7 years ago from Chicago

      "Quill"--- Thank you! I am grateful that you came by from the Yukon and thanks for letting me know you were here.

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      James A Watkins 7 years ago from Chicago

      tonymac04--- Yes, you are right that some of these artists are not Impressionists. I wanted to show where art went after the Impressionists a bit. I am a huge fan of Renoir. He and Manet are my favorite painters of the 19th Century, though Van Gogh's work is fascinating to be sure. You are welcome and I thank you for your insightful comments.

      James

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      James A Watkins 7 years ago from Chicago

      Green Lotus--- I know you have spent quite a time in the performing arts. I appreciate this visit and your comments. I'm glad I could bring back good memories. And you are most welcome.

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      benny Faye Douglass 7 years ago from Gold Canyon, Arizona

      Thank you James for you hub on Imperssionist art painters, I really enjoyed it. Thank you so much for sharing it. Godspeed. Creativeone59

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      James A Watkins 7 years ago from Chicago

      Hello, hello,--- I took a break for ten days but I am back and there are more Hubs coming soon. You are welcome and I am glad you enjoyed the beautiful art. Thank you for your encouragement. :-)

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      partisan patriot 7 years ago

      James

      Thanks for the education; I enjoyed your hub very much!

    • eovery profile image

      eovery 7 years ago from MIddle of the Boondocks of Iowa

      I wish I know moe about art. I was never much into it, but I do appreciate a nice picture/portrait when I see it.

      Keep on hubbing!

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      "Quill" 7 years ago

      Great Hub James and a reminder of the many great artist we have been blesed with having over the years.

      Blessings

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      Tony McGregor 7 years ago from South Africa

      I also love the Impressionists, though you have included some artists here that I would not lump with them!

      I saw some years ago a wonderful exhibition of Renoir's works. As ;part of that show the museum screened a doccy about Renoir in his later years, painting with brushes strapped to his hands as his arthritic hands couldn't hold them. I think I found that perhaps the most moving part of the whole show. That he could produce such incredible beauty while battling the physical pain and the incredible difficulty was a real marvel to me. I watched the doccy a few times over.

      Thanks for writing such a lovely Hub.

      Love and peace

      Tony

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      Hillary 7 years ago from Atlanta, GA

      Way back when I was a student of art and art history. Your hub has featured so many of my favorite artists it's like visiting with old friends. Thanks.

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      Hello, hello, 7 years ago from London, UK

      Hello, James, and I missed your hubs. I was worried you retired. Thank you for an interesting read, as always, and showing these fantastic picture. I so enjoyed it.

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      James A Watkins 7 years ago from Chicago

      lorlie6--- Thank you, dear. It was a pleasure to finish this project this morning after working on it yesterday. I appreciate you swinging in and you are most welcome.

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      Laurel Rogers 7 years ago from Bishop, Ca

      What a lovely hub to wake to! James, I remember lazily paying attention to my Art History classes in college until the Impressionists were introduced. All came to life for me!

      Thanks again!

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      James A Watkins 7 years ago from Chicago

      wolfpack5--- Thank you very much. I have a few more coming down the pike. :-)

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      James A Watkins 7 years ago from Chicago

      msorensson--- Thank you for being my first visitor! And you are welcome. I very much appreciate your compliments. Now that you mention Matisse, I am going to see an exhibit of his work soon. I think he is considered an Expressionist.

    • wolfpack5 profile image

      wolfpack5 7 years ago from Alberta Canada

      awesome hub, keep it up

    • msorensson profile image

      msorensson 7 years ago

      Wow, thanks for reminding. I have forgotten...Thank you.

      I must admit that your knowledge of the art world [and everything else] is quite impressive, James.

      I am partial to Renoir, Monet and Cezanne and a few of Van Gogh's paintings.

      Oh, but you have forgotten Matisse or is he not a rennaisance man?

      Thank you for clarification