ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel

iPhone Photos of London Architecture used in Corporate Photography Commissions.

Updated on July 8, 2014

I have been working in London as a professional photographer for over 20 years and have always enjoyed photographing City and West End architecture for clients and as a hobby. In the late 90s I noticed an increased pressure on photographers from building security agencies that had been told not to let people photograph the buildings they were responsible for. This meant taking commercial photos of architecture always meant several lays of security clearance before you could set up your tripod and get the shots done. Even then you would quite often be asked by security agents from other offices as to what you were doing and the odd passer by would feel it was OK to enquire about your equipment etc. The situation has not changed and if anything has got much worse. Also some areas of London if you set up a tripod you need a permit from the local borough which for a quick photo of a clients building is ridiculous.

With the introduction of good digital cameras you could get rid of the tripod and just grab shots as you wandered around London. This was OK in touristy areas as you can blend in to the general masses of clicking tourists. But getting a large DLSR with a good long lens out in certain areas of The City still made me feel like I was doing something wrong and often still sent the security guards heading my way. I was not alone in feeling this way and other professional photographers started a campaign group called I'm A Photographer Not A Terrorist which produced legal guidelines and a Bust Card with advise what to do if stopped by the Police or security guards. I do recall walking past Bank Station and seeing a pro photographer having his bag emptied on the street by two policeman in a very heavy handed manner.

Being naturally put off taking architecture shots and my corporate photography business moving more towards commercial headshots and event photos I kept my camera in my bag as I travelled through London. I did notice that I could still take the odd iPhone photo of an interesting building without raising any interest from the building security, but this was only for my reference to go back and take a proper photo at a later date. As the iPhone camera increased in quality and storage I become very keen on snapping City and West End architecture as I walked to and from commissions and the introduction off the wonderful Instagram allowed me to share my pics with friends and clients.

My iPhone collection of photos were still just a hobby and I found that as these were only for pleasure the normal restrictions I would have in place for client commissions i.e. be careful of reflections and avoid cars and telegraph poles etc were not applicable I was free to enjoy taking any aspect of London architecture. The other thing with using an iPhone is the fixed lens which tends to have a slightly wider view than a standard lens and therefore harder to frame conventionally. This meant I would have to try harder when shooting to include this feature in the lens and make sure the added elements in the photo benefit the shots.

Using new apps I was able to compensate exposure and contrast levels on my growing portfolio and began publishing them on my corporate photography blog. Also whilst sharing on social media I found that the more unusual and less commercial photos drew more interest. I put this down partly due to the ability to add captions when sharing as this allows viewers to locate the photo and then realise that they had been to the same area. Clients soon began to like these images and as the feel and look of Instagram images moved into commercial trends I received commissions to shoot business areas of The City in the style of Instagram. Initially I would shoot on my DSLR and then run the images through photoshop or an iPhone app to get the feel the client wanted. But I found that the images had a less than natural feel to them and they did not have the same spontaneous look to them.


One of my early iPhone photos which at that stage you could not really crop into them as the quality was not that good. So full frame and one of the basic instagram filters.
One of my early iPhone photos which at that stage you could not really crop into them as the quality was not that good. So full frame and one of the basic instagram filters. | Source
Another early iPhone photo which used the slightly wide lens to illustrate the size and scale of Hyde Park Corner.
Another early iPhone photo which used the slightly wide lens to illustrate the size and scale of Hyde Park Corner. | Source
One of my first iPhone photos and you can see the poor quality but the look that the filters give the images really works well on London buildings. Maddox Street in Mayfair.
One of my first iPhone photos and you can see the poor quality but the look that the filters give the images really works well on London buildings. Maddox Street in Mayfair. | Source
Savile Row W1. Processed in Super Retro App and then put in Instagram and this gives the London stone a grey hint and increases the colour saturation.
Savile Row W1. Processed in Super Retro App and then put in Instagram and this gives the London stone a grey hint and increases the colour saturation. | Source
Focusing on details and using the Thames as a backdrop. Southwark Bridge. The was a later shot on the iPhone5 and the quality is improving.
Focusing on details and using the Thames as a backdrop. Southwark Bridge. The was a later shot on the iPhone5 and the quality is improving. | Source
View from fenchurch street up towards The Gherkin. This was shot for one of my City clients and used on their new website.
View from fenchurch street up towards The Gherkin. This was shot for one of my City clients and used on their new website. | Source
View of Knightsbridge looking down the A4. Again a commission and I used the shadow and highlight tool in Super Retro and this levelled the images which was shot on a bright day.
View of Knightsbridge looking down the A4. Again a commission and I used the shadow and highlight tool in Super Retro and this levelled the images which was shot on a bright day. | Source
Lloyds Building on Fenchurch Street. Commissioned shot and the colours that instagram filters add brings out the colour in the building and levels out the shadow under the archway.
Lloyds Building on Fenchurch Street. Commissioned shot and the colours that instagram filters add brings out the colour in the building and levels out the shadow under the archway. | Source
Borough Market for a client in Borough High Street.
Borough Market for a client in Borough High Street. | Source
I would have never been able to take this shot with a pro camera or if I used a tripod. This street scene is near The Bank of England.
I would have never been able to take this shot with a pro camera or if I used a tripod. This street scene is near The Bank of England. | Source

Comments

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    No comments yet.

    working

    This website uses cookies

    As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, hubpages.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

    For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: https://hubpages.com/privacy-policy#gdpr

    Show Details
    Necessary
    HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
    LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
    Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
    AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
    Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
    CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
    Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
    Features
    Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
    Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
    Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
    Marketing
    Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
    Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
    Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
    Statistics
    Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
    ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)