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Life like sculptures of Jason deCaires Taylor, creator of world's first underwater sculpture park. Photo Gallery

Updated on March 28, 2012

Jason deCaires Taylor created underwater sculptures that will puzzle people for generations to come. He wanted to make people think and talk about delicate balance of nature and humans, about conservation and preservation of fragile environment and about beauty avaliable for everyone who is willing to see it. With his world's first underwater sculpture park located in Grenada, West Indies, he might just have succeeded.

Jason deCaires Taylor grew up exploring coral reefs of Malaysia. That's where he developed a profound love of the sea and unique view of the natural world around him. As a young adult, he was inspired by a delicate balance he saw between people and nature, especially water creatures. He spend several years traveling the world and working as a scuba instructor, gaining a better understanding of this balance and taking notes of beauty in nature. He wanted to share what he learned and produce art in public spaces, available for everyone to see. Similar to beauty of nature, also available for anyone's pleasure. However, his dream did not become reality for about a decade.

Taylor graduated in 1998 from the London Institute of Arts, with a B.A. Honours in Sculpture and Ceramics, but the world had to wait several more years before being amazed by Taylor's underwater creations. After graduation, he worked in Canterbury Cathedral and concert installations, gathering valuable skills he needed to produce his masterpiece. He learned how to carve stone, work cranes and complete projects on a grand scale.

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In 2006, the world heard Taylor's name as he completed a grand underwater project -the world's first underwater sculpture park located in Grenada, West Indies. All of his skills came into play for this project. He had to draw and design his sculptures, of course. But unlike a regular sculptor or architect, he also had to deal with natural bouncy of the water and supervise cranes while in full scuba gear. His sculptures were made for underwater - first ever underwater park in the Caribbean Sea.

Jason deCaires Taylor has gained significant interest and recognition for his unique work. More than 1000 articles in connection with the underwater park have been published. Some of the most notable publications include National Geographic, Vogue, USA Today, Daily Telegraph and The Guardian. Discovery Channel, BBC, CNN and several other television organizations have aired documentaries his sculptures.

Taylor hopes his public display would bring positive interactions between people and fragile underwater environment. The sculptures are as beautiful as they are thought-provoking. Many of the them are looking up, as if they are praying or hoping to see the sun. Some have hints of their environment near them, like a man with a dog. Some other sculptures stand in a crowd, as if for comfort. Why these particular poses; these particular faces; these few objects they were able to bring with them? Taylor wanted to bring more understanding of delicate balance between humans and nature; start the conversation about conservation and preservation.

The cement human statues stand silently, as fish swims around the sculptures and sea claims them with barnacles and seashells. Let the conversation begin.

Water sculptures of Jason deCaires Taylor

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    • agaglia profile image

      agaglia 4 years ago

      let the conversation begin! I love his work. this is very interesting. We are learning how man has changed the Earth's environment, but under water is some thing else.

      this is a fantastically interesting hub.