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Making the Evil Queen (Once Upon A Time) Costume Part 2

Updated on May 27, 2015

In case you didn't know:

This is the second part to my making this costume, so if you haven't read/seen the first, then please head there to get some context!

My "skirt" pieces laid out so I could easily distinguish which piece was what.
My "skirt" pieces laid out so I could easily distinguish which piece was what.

The "skirt"

The bottom half of the jacket in this costume is called the "skirt", which makes some sense if you have to name it something.

The pattern is pretty straightforwards when it comes to how to stitch the four pieces outer pieces together, which is the exact same way you do the lining. The hardest part about making this skirt piece is dealing with the large amount of fabric you have to maneuver on your machine when you go to sew the outer fabric to the lining.

When it came to dealing with the skirt, I found my two fabrics not wanting to maintain the basic shape and they instead bagged into blobs. My remedy: top-stitching. If you'll remember, I did this with the sleeve cuffs as well, so at least it doesn't look too out of place on the garment.

Barely noticeable on the fabric's pattern, but this is the line of top-stitching.
Barely noticeable on the fabric's pattern, but this is the line of top-stitching.
The lining's showing how rough the inside of that top-stitching looks, but obviously you can't see it when worn.
The lining's showing how rough the inside of that top-stitching looks, but obviously you can't see it when worn.

Attaching the "skirt" to the bodice

Sadly I don't have any photos of this progress, but I can tell you it took quite a bit of adjusting to make sure the pieces all fit how they were supposed to.

Since I had done top-stitching on the skirt, the sleeves,and around much of the bodice, it didn't seem out of place to use the top-stitch line to reinforced the skirt to the bodice. You can see that the line on the inside isn't perfect from the picture, but the other picture shows that the outside stitch looks just fine.

Pointing out the hooks and eyes, and you can also see the two rows of Velcro. You can also see what I was talking about with the scratchy and soft being next to each other on each side (alternated obviously for matching on the other panel).
Pointing out the hooks and eyes, and you can also see the two rows of Velcro. You can also see what I was talking about with the scratchy and soft being next to each other on each side (alternated obviously for matching on the other panel).

The Front Closure

I'm not going to lie, I struggled with the front closure's four hooks with handmade eyes, so I ended up not doing that exactly. I went out and bought some Velcro to measure out two side-by-side strips for the front. I decided the Velcro should have opposites on each of the overlapping panels so that if I needed the front to be open, I could fold over the panel on itself to keep the scratchy side from picking or catching on the fabric.

I hand stitched it on the very front side so it wouldn't be seen, but machine stitched it on the inner panel because it would be covered.

When trying on the garment, I felt the Velcro worked, but needed some insurance. So I still put in a set of hook and eyes, one at top and one at bottom of the front close.

View of the back with the grommet laced pieces.
View of the back with the grommet laced pieces.

The Back

The back requires two strips of interfacing-reinforced fabric which you then must grommet and sew onto the back for the lacing.

Now...I don't have a grommet setter, nor was I patient enough to go buy one. For each grommet placing I cut a hole, put in the pieces, and then used a soft rubber hammer to essentially bash the two pieces together. I don't advise doing as I did, go get the grommet setter or just don't do this at all. The laces really are cosmetic on my piece because the coat fits pretty well, so I wasn't too worried about the function of this back, just that it looked roughly as it should.

Looking back on this part of the garment, I would have just stitched the two pieces into the seams you sew them against, but I followed the instructions on this bit because of my guilt for fudging the grommets themselves.

Showing the embellishment.
Showing the embellishment.
Showing the embellishment on the whole of the blouse.
Showing the embellishment on the whole of the blouse.

Embellishments!

Considering how elaborate Regina's outfits are, I knew I wanted to add something to the coat to make it a little special beyond the fabric choice.

I luckily already had the small channel beads from my jewelry making supplies and found the colors to match almost perfectly. It took awhile because I was hand stitching the row of beads, but by doing it in 3 to 5 bead lines, it made the process a little faster. In the end I only did the front of the bodice in one line, but I didn't want to overdo it even though Regina is usually stacked with embellishments.

A tips when thinking about putting beads on: use a thin needle that is made for this job, it makes it much easier and you'll curse less than when a bead doesn't fit on your regular size needle.

The finished product with some other Once Upon A Time cosplayers at Megacon 2015.
The finished product with some other Once Upon A Time cosplayers at Megacon 2015.

The Finished Piece!

For the final look I needed a pair of leggings, a corset (personal choice), jewelry, and some boots.

When I wore this cosplay/costume to Megacon (2015) I had intended to use the hat I made, but in the end I decided against it as it didn't work with my hairstyle choice. I chose not to wear a wig for this cosplay, so to darken my hair temporarily I used a colored mouse bought at Sally Beauty Supply.

My sewing notes, some were added after this picture, but you get the idea.
My sewing notes, some were added after this picture, but you get the idea.

Last Thoughts

After wearing this all day to a convention there are a few things I'm going to fix and some thoughts on the garment I'm going to share to you.

  • The outer fabric is itchy and unfortunately the place where the sleeves and the bodice met had raw edges exposed to my skin. I'm definitely adding some binding to cover this before the next time I wear this garment.
  • This coat can be HOT. I was only wearing and my bra under the top (I've seen other women in less at cons), but it was still uncomfortable after awhile, even in air conditioning.
  • The length of this was perfect on me, so the "skirt" barely hit the ground. To note: I'm 5'8" and I cut a size 16.
  • Keep sewing notes as you work and put them in with the pattern when you're done. These help you if you have to make the garment again so that you know what you did to adjust the garment the first time.

I hope this helped you in some way, got you excited to do one yourself, or maybe just entertained you.

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