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My Quilt Album and Quilting Basics

Updated on August 9, 2015
Marie Flint profile image

Marie is a self-taught quilter. She has been making quilts as a hobby since 1970. You can find her projects on Pinterest and Facebook.

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Pastel Petals

Size: 70" x 90" (twin). Pattern: Traditional nine patch combined with original machine-appliqued flower. Setting: On point. Quilting: Machine with hand quilting around each appliqued flower. Flying geese border. Place made: East Tawas, MI Time to make: Four (4) months. Dated: 2003

Story behind the quilt: This was made during my quilting spree, working from 7 a.m. to 10:00 p.m., taking time off only for meals and personal hygiene. I experimented with finishing raw edges for machine applique, and I accomplished this by using fusible interfacing strips.

The quilt has endured well over the years and is now owned by my niece in North Carolina.

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Rhapsody in Blue-Lavender


Size: 70" x 90" (twin). Pattern and setting: Traditional 16-24 pieced star blocks with solid white setting blocks. Halved Rail Fence blocks for outer border. Quilting: Hand and machine. Place made: East Tawas, MI Time to complete: Five (5) months. Dated: 2004


Story behind the quilt: I was intrigued by geometric patterns. The block pattern and idea came from American Patchwork & Quilting, published by Meridith Corporation (Iowa) in 1985 (ISBN 0-696-01015-1). In fact, I recommend this book as a good beginner's guide. Its 320 pages are well organized with both black-and-white and colored illustrations. Terms and index are included at the back.


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A Summer Wade

Size: 70" x 90" (twin). Pattern: Originally sketched blue heron with plants. Setting: Two-inch pastel squares aligning diagonally. Piecing: Hand appliqued and embroidered. All rest is machine pieced. Quilting: Hand echo quilting in center; light machine quilting on remaining. Place made: East Tawas, MI Time to make: Three and a half (3 1/2) months. Dated: 2006

Story behind the quilt: Having finished two other quilts, I decided to make one for a childhood friend in payment of a debt. After finishing it, I sent her pictures, but she decided not to accept the quilt. I accomplished the centerpiece applique by sketching on newspaper-industry end roll (often available at no cost because the news industry can't use it) with pencil and then highlighting with a wide black marker. The black ink proved visible through my quilting fabric with the use of a small light box, purchased at Ben Franklin's, East Tawas, MI, for about $14. The use of small squares alternating in color is common in shadow quilts. As time passed, I realized the importance of quality fabric because some of the areas had "bearded," a term meaning some of the batting shows through the fabric. This quilt is still on the family farm in Michigan. Interestingly enough, its exact whereabouts are unknown!

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Eight-Pointed Star Sampler

Size: 52" x 72" (throw). Pattern: Saw-tooth stars. Setting: Side-by-side with white setting blocks. Quilting: Hand. Place made: Bay City, MI Time to make: Three (3) months. Dated: 2010

Story behind the quilt: This was the first quilt made for Premier Care, a transitional home in Bay City, Michigan, for persons experiencing hospital discharge but needing care. The block was inspired by Quilt magazine in a quilt called "Back in Time Stars." The color harmony of individual blocks was time consuming, but I was driven by my enthusiam for quilts. A lot of hand quilting went into this work and the other quilts I made for the house.

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Exercise in Setting Blocks

Size: 52" x 72". Pattern: Eight-pointed star, square-in-the-corner, and variation four-patch. Setting: Constructed to frame and border the featured stars. Quilting: Hand. Place made: East Tawas, MI Time to make: Three (3) months. Dated: 2010

Story behind the quilt: This was made during my ongoing quilting "fever" stage. I had resided briefly at a group home in Bay City, Michigan, and had already made one quilt for the house. I had the idea I wanted to make a quilt for each bed in the house for a total of eight quilts. I saw the basic layout in a small book containing quilting poems. I found the layout challenging, so I carefully studied the picture and broke down the block elements. My color scheme was different and I didn't use as many outside borders. I was pleased with the result, and Premier Care in Bay City, MI, now owns it along with the two other quilts that I made after this one (four quilts total).

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Rainbow Pyramids

Size: 51 1/2" x 71". Pattern: Equilateral triangle. Setting: Smaller triangles fitting into larger triangles with constructed large half triangles to complete the frame. Quilting: Hand. One-inch parallel lines. Place made: East Tawas, MI Time to make: Three and a half (3 1/2) months. Dated: 2010

Story behind the quilt: This was the last quilt made for Premier Care. The quilt is made from a single template. I took great care in blending colors and layout the pyramids in relationship to one another. Much of the work was done while participating in a non-fee quilter's group at The Cotton Patch in East Tawas, Michigan. The parallel hand quilting really enhanced the block patterns. Of all the quilts I made for the house, I was especially proud of this one.

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Hybrid Jacob's Ladder

Size: 49" x 69" Pattern: Jacob's Ladder block. Setting: Side-by-side. Quilting: Hand. Place made: East Tawas, MI Time to make: Two and three-fourths (2 3/4) months. Dated: 2010

Story behind the quilt: This was the third quilt I made for Premier Care. The flower print went so well with a solid blue-green fabric I had. When working with scraps, it is preferable to have at least three colors matching or blending with other prints used in the quilt. Alas, I didn't have enough of my original fabrics, so I ended up purchasing fabrics that blended for the finishing the quilt. This would have worked better if I had figured my square footage and purchased the fabrics first. Then I could have balanced all the fabrics together. As is, I have about 3/4 of the quilt featuring the original fabrics and the remainder in the purchsed ones; hence, a "hybrid."

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Tussie-Mussie

Size: 40" x 49". Pattern: Star block combined with Greek Cross block (FONS AND PORTER July/August 2008). Setting: Side-by-side. Quilting: Hand. Outlined 1/4" inside seams. Place made: West Branch, MI Time to make: Three (3) months. Dated: 2011

Story behind the quilt: I made this for my hospital roommate, an elderly lady. I asked her what her favorite color was, and she answered "purple." After my discharge, I finished it and took it to her in the nursing home where she resided. She was thrilled; the quilt really made her day. She passed away about a year later and the quilt remains in her estate.

(partial view)
(partial view) | Source

Sun Bonnet Sue

Size: 40" x 48" Pattern: Sun Bonnet Sue combined with designer block. Setting: Side-by-side. Piecing: Hand appliqued (Sun Bonnet Sue block) and machine pieced (designer block). Quilting: Hand. Place made: West Branch, MI Time to make: Three (3) months. Dated: 2011

Story behind the quilt: I was intrigued by a designer block in a quilt magazine, probably FONS & PORTER'S Love of Quilting. I thought it would work well with an appliqued block, and I chose "Sun Bonnet Sue," which is a very popular traditional block. When working, I like to design my own templates for a block, and this was no exception. Seasoned quilters always recommend making one block before cutting out the rest. This is a good rule to follow because, that way, you know what adjustments are necessary, if any. As soon as I started making this quilt, I knew I wanted it to go to my step granddaughter, who was nine years old at the time. She did get her quilt and loved it. Unfortunately, she left it at her father's (my son-in-law's) house and her whereabouts are unknown to him. At least I know the quilt is being used and appreciated. It decorates the back of a couch in my daughter's home. I hope the girl is able to reconnect with her father and have the quilt to take it wherever she goes.


Table of Warm, Cool, and Neutral Colors

Warm Colors
Cool Colors
Neutrals
yellow
blue
white
orange
green
brown or tan
red
purple
gray or black

The Basics of Using Colors in Fabrics

The nicest quilts have a balance of warm, cool, and neutral colors. The fabrics should have a common value (also known as tone or tint). In other words, you don't want really bold, bright colors mixed with dull, dusty-looking ones and vice versa. The use of white always brightens the overall appearance. Black can make colors really "pop," a technique used in many Amish quilts. Generally, a mixture of at least three prints and two solids make for a very pleasing quilt. The prints should share at least three matching colors among them, a sort of "common denominator" in math. The solids can bring out a common color from the prints or simply be one of the neutral colors, or both. Fabrics that you thought wouldn't go together at first often turn out to be stunning together in a quilt. One hundred percent (100%) cotton works best for beginners. Enjoy your fabrics!

A Simply Designed Charity Quilt

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© 2013 Marie Flint

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    • RTalloni profile image

      RTalloni 4 years ago from the short journey

      Your quilts are beautiful! I am always amazed at quilter's work. Though my friends tell me I should try it again, I am content to enjoy seeing other's projects. Thanks for giving us a look at yours.

    • ChitrangadaSharan profile image

      Chitrangada Sharan 4 years ago from New Delhi, India

      Your quit album is beautiful and the color combination is elegant. Very creative and neat work.I love making them.

      Thanks for sharing!

    • Marie Flint profile image
      Author

      Marie Flint 4 years ago from Jacksonville, Florida USA

      I've tried to provide two links, but there seems to be a technical issue. My favorite quilt site for inspiration is http://www.amishcountrylanes.com. The Fons and Porter LOVE OF QUILTS magazine, which I referenced on the Tussie-Mussie quilt, has a website at http://www.fonsandporter.com.

      May your love of quilting fill you with unending joy and beauty!

    • peachpurple profile image

      peachy 4 years ago from Home Sweet Home

      beautiful quilt you have. You sure are great and your hand sewing skill is excellent ! Voted beautiful

    • Marie Flint profile image
      Author

      Marie Flint 3 years ago from Jacksonville, Florida USA

      The Kaye Wood video uses a serger and a quilt-as-you-go strip sandwich method for making a small quilt. This is a good basic quilt for beginners. My method is very different because I design the top and sew it together first. Then I "sandwich" (place the front and back together with the batting in between) the quilt. The little quilt in the video is already quilted and reversible because of the technique used. Kaye Wood is a well known name among quilters. Enjoy!

    • FlourishAnyway profile image

      FlourishAnyway 3 years ago from USA

      Your quilts are lovely and will surely be treasured for years to come. I have a quilt made by my paternal grandmother. She died when my father was a young teen. It is no longer usable on a bed but nevertheless a connection to a woman I wished I had known.

    • Marie Flint profile image
      Author

      Marie Flint 2 years ago from Jacksonville, Florida USA

      For the record, my hand stitching (for which the pictures do not do justice) has 9-11 stitches per inch. This type of work takes a lot of patience, and I find the work relaxing as well as rewarding.

      Thank all of you for your generous comments.

    • Marie Flint profile image
      Author

      Marie Flint 2 years ago from Jacksonville, Florida USA

      My step granddaughter Olivia now lives with her father and has full access to her quilt. ~~~

    • profile image

      Eduard 2 years ago

      I love hearing the soitres behind the pretty pictures!! And as a novice quilter, I read every tutorial I can get my hands on. I may not always make them, but I do save all the ones that even remotely look like something I'd like to do in the future. I love the idea of skill building by the block if it's a real chore, then you can simply elect not to repeat that block & if it's something you love the look of, you can return & do a whole quilt with it. Smart cookie! Thanks for sharing!!!!

    • Marie Flint profile image
      Author

      Marie Flint 2 years ago from Jacksonville, Florida USA

      You're welcome, Eduard.

      I'm trying to focus more on curves and art quilts as I progress with my techniques. I have a few pictures of quilts I'd like to make on Pinterest.

      Wishing you every success with your quilting!

    • profile image

      Marcela 2 years ago

      My QA arrived today and I was so, so pcyehsd to see your name, your quilts, and read your article... a lot of it I knew from reading your blog, of course, but it was wonderful to see it there contained and of a piece -- so official, so glossy, and so well-written. Kudos...(and the quilts, well, you know how much I love the quilts!)

    • Marie Flint profile image
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      Marie Flint 2 years ago from Jacksonville, Florida USA

      Dear Macela, I'm not sure you actually intended this comment for me, as I do not have a blog, but since it's related to quilts, and you're so enthusiastic about them, I am allowing your comment here.

      From one quilt lover to another, blessings!

    • Marie Flint profile image
      Author

      Marie Flint 20 months ago from Jacksonville, Florida USA

      As a side note to this hub, my step granddaughter has reunited with her father and resides with him. She and I have become the best of friends. I'm now working on a quilt for my new grandson! Pictures of my grandson's quilt can be viewed on Facebook by friends.

    • Marie Flint profile image
      Author

      Marie Flint 20 months ago from Jacksonville, Florida USA

      As a side note to this hub, my step granddaughter has reunited with her father and resides with him. She and I have become the best of friends. I'm now working on a quilt for my new grandson! Pictures of my grandson's quilt can be viewed on Facebook by friends.

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