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Paper Quilling - Wheatear Coil Techniques, Shapes and Designs

Updated on April 20, 2018
lady rain profile image

Lady Rain works as a daytime stock trader and writes about crafts and travels. She spends her weekends doing papercraft models and painting.

Quilling paper art
Quilling paper art | Source

Many paper quilling shapes are made with the Wheatear Coil technique. Wheatears are loose closed coils. Unlike other small closed coils used in paper quilling, each loop in a Wheatear coil is fixed in place with glue to prevent the centres of the coil from falling out. The coils are usually much bigger and longer than other closed coils. Wheatears are popularly used for making flower stalks, leaves and long strips of grass in paper quilling crafts.

There are several ways to make coils using the Wheatear technique.

Making Wheatears with Fingers

Click thumbnail to view full-size
Make a small loop with quilling paperWrap another loop around the small loopContinue loopingA Wheatear coilA flower stalk using Wheatear Technique
Make a small loop with quilling paper
Make a small loop with quilling paper | Source
Wrap another loop around the small loop
Wrap another loop around the small loop | Source
Continue looping
Continue looping | Source
A Wheatear coil
A Wheatear coil | Source
A flower stalk using Wheatear Technique
A flower stalk using Wheatear Technique | Source

Using Your Fingers

If you are deft with your fingers, it is very easy to make the coils. If not, the worst you can end up are badly shaped coils plus a sticky mess with the glue! To make a Wheatear coil, take a strip of quilling paper. Make a small loop at one end of the strip. Apply a little glue at the end and fold the long end over the small loop to make a slightly larger loop. Slightly pinch the glued end with your fingers. Apply glue again and bring the quilling paper strip over the smaller loops. Continue to make more loops until you are satisfy with the size of the coil. You might have to add more paper strips to make a bigger coil.

How to Make Wheatears with a Quilling Board and Pins

Click thumbnail to view full-size
Insert pins on a quilling boardQuilling paper for loopingMake first loop around first two pinsWrap quilling paper around third pinApply a little glue on the paper around the first pinContinue looping...Keep looping...Glue and trim off excess paperA Wheatear coil
Insert pins on a quilling board
Insert pins on a quilling board | Source
Quilling paper for looping
Quilling paper for looping | Source
Make first loop around first two pins
Make first loop around first two pins | Source
Wrap quilling paper around third pin
Wrap quilling paper around third pin | Source
Apply a little glue on the paper around the first pin
Apply a little glue on the paper around the first pin | Source
Continue looping...
Continue looping... | Source
Keep looping...
Keep looping... | Source
Glue and trim off excess paper
Glue and trim off excess paper | Source
A Wheatear coil
A Wheatear coil | Source

Making Coils with A Quilling Board and Pins

Insert five pins into a quilling board and align the pins in a straight line. Wrap a strip of quilling paper around the first and second pins, and glue the paper to secure the loop. Next, wrap the quilling paper around the third pin and apply a small amount of glue on the paper that is wrapped around the first pin. Repeat and continue looping with the fourth and fifth pins. Bring the paper to the first pin and apply glue. Trim off the excess bit of paper. Remove the pins. Pinch the Wheatear coil with your fingers to form the shape you require. This method is the same as making a straight husking.

Instructions on making huskings are available in the following tutorial:


Making Wheatears with a Normal Comb

Click thumbnail to view full-size
Comb and quilling paperWrap quilling paper around two prongs of combLoop around next two prongsContinue looping...And looping...Glue and trim off excess paperA Wheatear coil
Comb and quilling paper
Comb and quilling paper | Source
Wrap quilling paper around two prongs of comb
Wrap quilling paper around two prongs of comb | Source
Loop around next two prongs
Loop around next two prongs | Source
Continue looping...
Continue looping... | Source
And looping...
And looping... | Source
Glue and trim off excess paper
Glue and trim off excess paper | Source
A Wheatear coil
A Wheatear coil | Source

Use of A Quilling Comb

A quilling comb (an afro comb or normal comb can be used) works in the same way as the quilling board and pins method mentioned above. Wrap a strip of quilling paper around the prongs of the comb in the same way as with the pins on the quilling board.

The comb method is very useful in making many beautiful paper quilling coils. If you want to know more about how to make other coils using a quilling comb, a full tutorial with detailed instructions is found here:

How to Use a Pencil to Make Round Wheatears

Click thumbnail to view full-size
Pencil and quilling paperWrap quilling paper around pencil and glueMake a bigger loop over the first loopMake more loopsA rounded Wheatear loop
Pencil and quilling paper
Pencil and quilling paper | Source
Wrap quilling paper around pencil and glue
Wrap quilling paper around pencil and glue | Source
Make a bigger loop over the first loop
Make a bigger loop over the first loop | Source
Make more loops
Make more loops | Source
A rounded Wheatear loop
A rounded Wheatear loop | Source

Using a Pencil or Dowel

The pencil method is used in making Wheatear coils that are round in shape rather than teardrop shaped. Wrap a strip of quilling paper around a pencil and glue the end to secure the first loop. Make a slightly bigger loop over the first loop and glue where the loop touches the paper again. Continue wrapping and looping until you get the coil size you want. Glue to secure the loops and trim off the excess end of the paper. If desired, this Wheatear coil can be shaped by pinching the coil with the fingers.

Click thumbnail to view full-size
A rainbow Wheatear coilTake strips of coloured quilling paperApply a small amount of glue at the endsStick the papers togetherMake the first small loop with the pink colourLoop the orange paper around the pink loopNext is yellow...Then green...And blue...Purple loop. Add an extra strip of purple colour paper for the last loop
A rainbow Wheatear coil
A rainbow Wheatear coil | Source
Take strips of coloured quilling paper
Take strips of coloured quilling paper | Source
Apply a small amount of glue at the ends
Apply a small amount of glue at the ends | Source
Stick the papers together
Stick the papers together | Source
Make the first small loop with the pink colour
Make the first small loop with the pink colour | Source
Loop the orange paper around the pink loop
Loop the orange paper around the pink loop | Source
Next is yellow...
Next is yellow... | Source
Then green...
Then green... | Source
And blue...
And blue... | Source
Purple loop.
Purple loop. | Source
Add an extra strip of purple colour paper for the last loop
Add an extra strip of purple colour paper for the last loop | Source

Fun with Wheatear Coil Technique

Let's have a bit of fun and make a rainbow coil. You can use any of the methods mentioned above to make this coil. In this example, I used my fingers to make the loops!

Take six or seven strips of quilling paper of different colours. Align the ends of the papers together, apply a little bit of glue and stick them all together. Begin with one strip of paper to make a small loop. Then make another bigger loop around the first loop with the next strip of paper that is closest to the small loop. Keep making a loop with a different coloured strip of paper and you will get a rainbow coloured Wheatear coil! You will need an extra strip of paper to do the last loop if the coil is big.

© 2013 lady rain

Comments

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  • lady rain profile imageAUTHOR

    lady rain 

    5 years ago from Australia

    Glimmer Twin Fan, I find paper quilling an easy craft to learn compared to other crafts, so you should give it a try! Thank you for stopping by :)

  • Glimmer Twin Fan profile image

    Claudia Mitchell 

    5 years ago

    This is beautiful. I really need to try quilling. Pinned. If you get this message two times, it's because there seemed to be problems commenting.

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