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How to Make a Flapper Wedding Cap

Updated on August 30, 2016
sallybea profile image

Sally Gulbrandsen Feltmaker. Her tutorials & techniques are as individual as she is, unique, experimental and always interesting

Thinking Ahead!

Keep a vision of what you want to achieve in your head.
Keep a vision of what you want to achieve in your head. | Source

Sourcing Items for this Project

Sourcing Crochet Doilies, Ribbon and Lace.
Sourcing Crochet Doilies, Ribbon and Lace. | Source

Recycle with purpose in your mind.

Beautiful need not always be expensive! This unique 1920’s flapper style hat was created using only recycled fabrics. Vintage Lace was sourced from local thrift stores or car boot sales. The little '‘skull cap’ is made from a piece of recycled curtain netting which was soaked in PVA craft glue and molded around a wooden hat block. The little cap became the base for this stunning 1920's flapper wedding hat.

Vintage crochet and lace can also be sourced from Amazon so too can vintage wooden hat lasts be found. Finding a bargain is getting a lot more difficult but e-Bay is still one of my favorite places to find items like these.


Keep the end result fixed in your mind

A 1920's flapper wedding hat
A 1920's flapper wedding hat | Source

Crochet and Lace with Sallybea

A note on hat blocks

Vintage hat blocks can be simple or complex. Wooden blocks are tactile and beautiful. One can't help being drawn to stroke and smooth the wood beneath your fingers. Behind the layers of varnish lay many hours of work by a skilled craftsman. They have become very collectible and expensive. Choose your hat blocks with care and treat them kindly and they should last for many years. Cover them in cling wrap or tin foil when using with wet wool. This will help protect the wood.

Things you will need for this Tutorial

A hat block/either wooden or polystyrene.

Cling Wrap

A piece of heavy duty curtain netting

PVA Craft or hobby glue

A small piece of fabric lining in a complimentary color

Vintage cotton lace doilies (tatted or crochet) in neutral shades

Bits and pieces of vintage lace ribbons and lace

A pair of sharp scissors

Pins and a long sewing needle

Rubber bands

Cling wrap

A glue gun with glue sticks

Wooden hat block

Wooden Hat Block
Wooden Hat Block | Source

Method

Begin by covering a wooden hat block with cling wrap as shown below. This will prevent any glue from sticking to or from damaging the hat block below.

Hat block covered in cling wrap

Hat block covered in cling wrap
Hat block covered in cling wrap | Source

PVA craft or hobby glue, wooden hat block, curtain netting and rubber bands

PVA craft or hobby glue and the draped hat block with tightened rubber bands.
PVA craft or hobby glue and the draped hat block with tightened rubber bands. | Source

Preparing the wooden hat block

Drape a thickly woven piece of curtain net over the cling wrapped hat block as shown below.

Draping the curtain netting over the hat block

The draped hat block
The draped hat block | Source

Adjust the folds

Use elastic bands as shown here to gather in the fabric. The folds in the curtain netting should be adjusted to give a pleasing effect.

Use rubber bands to help gather in the folds neatly

Gather in the loose fabric using the rubber band to good effect.
Gather in the loose fabric using the rubber band to good effect. | Source

Spread PVA craft hobby glue on the head area.

Curtain netting impregnated with PVA craft glue
Curtain netting impregnated with PVA craft glue | Source

Spread the glue.

Spread a nice thick layer of PVA Hobby glue on the curtain netting. . Work it well into the fabric above the eyes and the forehead. Spread it around the sides and back of the head until you reach the elastic band area on the neck. Make sure the pleats in the fabric are well glued so that they do not move when the glue is dry.

You may wish to use your hands or a paintbrush to do this. Remember that the glue is water solvent so you won't have a problem rinsing your hands or the paintbrush in water.


Leave the glue to dry properly, preferably overnight.

Trim the net cap carefully with a pair of sharp scissors

Once dry, trim the net cap as shown with a pair of sharp scissors. The cap should maintain its shape perfectly once removed from the block.

This small surprisingly flexible ‘skull cap’ is about to become the base for your 1920’s lace wedding flapper hat.

Front view (Excess fabric trimmed)

The front view of the curtain net cap
The front view of the curtain net cap | Source

Back view

Trim the long edges and shape the back
Trim the long edges and shape the back | Source

Side View

Side view of the trimmed curtain netting cap
Side view of the trimmed curtain netting cap | Source

Lining the Hat

Remove the cap carefully from the hat block.

Turn the cap inside out and place it back onto a hat block. You may use either a wooden block or a polystyrene hat block as shown here. The latter makes it easy to envisage what the finished hat might look like on a human head.

Drape a piece of silk lining over the skull cap and secure the fabric to it with tightly stretched elastic bands. Arrange the folds in a pleasing way and then either glue the fabric onto the cap with a glue gun or sew it securely with a long needle as shown below.

Trimming the lining

Trimming the lining
Trimming the lining | Source

Put the cap back onto the hat last

Put the hat back onto the hat last. The lining will now be on the inside.

Cover the cap with a piece of lace. In this case, I used a piece of a crochet table cloth.

Glue the edges of the lace to the surface of the net cap so that the lace fits snugly against the curtain netting cap. This lace layer will now become the first layer for the flapper hat.

If you miss out this stage it is possible that the curtain netting layer will show through the layers of lace.

The crochet table cloth glued to the edges of the net cap.

Glue only the edges of the crochet work to the edges of the net cap.
Glue only the edges of the crochet work to the edges of the net cap. | Source

Tuck in any excess lace where required.

Tuck in any excess lace. Retain any which you may wish to drape at the back of the hat. Finish off the inside of the hat with either bias tape or glue on some trim or ribbon to the inside of the hat.

You want the inside of the hat to look as nice at the completed flapper hat.

Tuck in excess fabric at the front

Tuck in excess fabric and neaten off the edges inside the cap.
Tuck in excess fabric and neaten off the edges inside the cap. | Source

Back view of the lace covered cap

I decided to retain some of the length but I could have equally tucked in all the excess lace.
I decided to retain some of the length but I could have equally tucked in all the excess lace. | Source

Experiment with the lace before you pick up the glue gun

Experiment with the placement of the lace.
Experiment with the placement of the lace. | Source

Working out your design

Experiment with different pieces of crochet and lace before you pick up the glue gun. Get it right at this stage and avoid costly mistakes later.

The rear view of the flapper wedding cap

The completed flapper wedding hat.
The completed flapper wedding hat. | Source

A 1920's flapper wedding cap.

The completed 1920's flapper wedding cap.
The completed 1920's flapper wedding cap. | Source

Recycling

Are you interested in recycling vintage lace for creative projects such as this one?

See results

© 2015 Sally Gulbrandsen

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    • sallybea profile image
      Author

      Sally Gulbrandsen 8 months ago from Norfolk

      You are much too kind Audrey. I always have in my mind the thought that it took someone else many hours to create what I already think is a piece of art. I always feel I have to justify my desire to make it into something different. Sometimes I just cannot bring myself to do it:)

      I appreciate your taking the time to comment Audrey. Enjoy your knitting, that is something I wish I could do better.

    • vocalcoach profile image

      Audrey Hunt 8 months ago from Nashville Tn.

      This is both elegant and unique! You are beyond talented. I like to collect vintage pieces of lace and swatches of crochet. I'm teaching myself to knit and hoping I can add a touch of these pieces to my project. I'm not too good at this sort of thing but I keep trying. :)

    • sallybea profile image
      Author

      Sally Gulbrandsen 19 months ago from Norfolk

      AudreyHowitt

      So glad you loved it. I had a lot of fun creating it though I felt a certain responsibility to those who had created the beautiful lace and tatting to enhance their work, with the end, result. I think it turned out pretty good so I hope they will look at it that way. I appreciate your stopping by to comment, thank you so much.

      Sally

    • AudreyHowitt profile image

      Audrey Howitt 19 months ago from California

      Loved, loved this! I am a big lace fan and crochet a fair amount of it--this was right up my alley and your instructions were so clear and easy to follow!

    • sallybea profile image
      Author

      Sally Gulbrandsen 19 months ago from Norfolk

      Helga Silva

      I appreciate the visit and the feedback. I do have several felting hubs which are suitable for both adults and children. I hope you and the children will return sometime to discover the art of making felt.

    • Helga Silva profile image

      Helga Silva 19 months ago from USA

      This cap is so gorgeous! I am glad I found your hubs because I love crafts and you are giving such detailed instructions with so many pictures. Thank you! These tutorial are great to get the kids involved as well.

    • sallybea profile image
      Author

      Sally Gulbrandsen 20 months ago from Norfolk

      Hi Dave,

      Your continued support is valued and appreciated Dave even though I am sure you will never make a 1920's wedding hat out of crochet doilies. Thank you for the visit and the very kind comment.

      Sally

    • D.A.L. profile image

      Dave 20 months ago from Lancashire north west England

      Hi Sally, what a wonderful tutor you are an your imaginative designs are always a pleasure to see. The way you lay out your tutorials make it easy for people to follow inspiring them to have a go. I can imagine many young girls trying this beautiful idea out. Best of luck with all your future tutorials.

    • sallybea profile image
      Author

      Sally Gulbrandsen 20 months ago from Norfolk

      FlourishAnyway

      Definitely doable, the hard part was figuring out how to achieve the end result. Thanks for stopping by to comment, you continued support is valued and appreciated.

      Sally

    • FlourishAnyway profile image

      FlourishAnyway 20 months ago from USA

      This is so pretty, and the instructions you provide certainly make it seem doable.

    • sallybea profile image
      Author

      Sally Gulbrandsen 20 months ago from Norfolk

      Larry Rankin

      Thank you, glad you found it so. I appreciate your stopping by to comment.

      Sally

    • Larry Rankin profile image

      Larry Rankin 20 months ago from Oklahoma

      Very interesting.

    • sallybea profile image
      Author

      Sally Gulbrandsen 20 months ago from Norfolk

      DDE

      Hi Devika

      Glad you enjoyed this tutorial. I have been dreaming about doing this for a long time but was never quite sure how to achieve the end result without messing up my beautiful doilies. I am glad I eventually took the plunge and put my thoughts into action. I feel it was definitely worth it.

      Best wishes,

      Sally.

    • DDE profile image

      Devika Primić 20 months ago from Dubrovnik, Croatia

      Amazing work here! I like the idea, you brilliantly explained and showed me something I never had in mind.

    • sallybea profile image
      Author

      Sally Gulbrandsen 20 months ago from Norfolk

      Genna East

      It makes me very happy to receive such a lovely compliment, I am delighted that you thought the end result of this project stunning, I very much appreciate your taking the time to comment, thank you so much.

      Best wishes,

      Sally.

    • Genna East profile image

      Genna East 20 months ago from Massachusetts, USA

      What beautiful ideas and construction; the flapper's wedding cap is both delicate and stunning.

    • sallybea profile image
      Author

      Sally Gulbrandsen 20 months ago from Norfolk

      Rota

      Glad you like the flapper hat and the use of doilies for it. The love and skill which went into some of the doilies deserved a project such as this one. I appreciate the visit and your feedback. Thank you.

      Sally

    • sallybea profile image
      Author

      Sally Gulbrandsen 20 months ago from Norfolk

      Hi Donna,

      Glad you liked this project and found the process interesting. I as always appreciate the visit and the feedback.

      Best wishes,

      Sally

    • Rota profile image

      Rota 20 months ago

      This is super cute. What a great and creative use for doilies!

    • purl3agony profile image

      Donna Herron 20 months ago from USA

      This flapper headdress is so pretty and would be stunning with the right dress. Your process for creating this piece is so interesting. Thanks so much for including your step-by-step photos. Love it!

    • sallybea profile image
      Author

      Sally Gulbrandsen 20 months ago from Norfolk

      Hi Billy

      Glad you liked it and hope the relatives like it too:)

      You have a great weekend Billy

      Sally

    • billybuc profile image

      Bill Holland 20 months ago from Olympia, WA

      What a really cool idea. I'm not going to do it, of course, but it is still very creative. I'll pass it along to relatives.

      Have a wonderful weekend, Sally!

      bill

    • sallybea profile image
      Author

      Sally Gulbrandsen 20 months ago from Norfolk

      Victoria Lynn

      I love lace too and it is always with some reluctance that I use it. I have debated with myself for a long about using some of these treasures of but finally I succumbed to the idea, just so long as I could enhance the beauty of it in my work. I hope I succeeded.

      Thanks for stopping by and for commenting on this hub. It is much appreciated.

      Best wishes,

      Sally

    • Victoria Lynn profile image

      Victoria Lynn 20 months ago from Arkansas, USA

      Oh, I love this. I love old lace, and I love wearing hats. I just got rid of a bunch of old doilies. I'll have to start looking for more now. And lace!

    • sallybea profile image
      Author

      Sally Gulbrandsen 20 months ago from Norfolk

      MsDora

      So glad you enjoyed this hub as much as I enjoyed creating it. Sometimes it can be a challenge as one never knows quite how a project will turn out. I am happy to say that I am delighted with the result and know that with a little more experimentation I will get it perfect.

      Thank you for the comment and the welcome Applause.

      Best wishes,

      Sally.

    • MsDora profile image

      Dora Isaac Weithers 20 months ago from The Caribbean

      I'm thinking "exquisite" and "gorgeous" as the picture of the wedding cap comes up. You're an expert and so generous in sharing your skills. Applause! Applause!

    • sallybea profile image
      Author

      Sally Gulbrandsen 20 months ago from Norfolk

      I love recycling too, especially when it gives me the freedom to do things like this. I much appreciate your stopping by to comment.

      Thank you very much.

      Sally.

    • PAINTDRIPS profile image

      Denise McGill 20 months ago from Fresno CA

      Lovely project. I love recycling. Sweet.

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