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How to Prevent Yarn Burn with a Crocheter's Thimble (Free Pattern)

Updated on September 28, 2014
I just used my scrap threads for this, that's why the tip is blue, while the body is gold.
I just used my scrap threads for this, that's why the tip is blue, while the body is gold. | Source

Ever get yarn burn from crocheting? Yarn burn is caused by the friction from the yarn rubbing on your finger while doing crochet. I personally get this whenever I crochet with either thread or yarn. The inspiration for this project came from the need to get rid of the yarn burn my pointing finger was always getting from crochet.

This is a simple project to protect your fingers from severe yarn burn. It is also a good way of using up your scrap thread.

Materials

  • Size 10 crochet cotton thread
  • No. 8 steel hook or size needed to obtain gauge

Gauge

10 sc = 1", 13 sc rows = 1"

Note 1: In order to find the right gauge you need for your finger, measure its circumference below your nail. Adjust the hook size accordingly if the gauge above is not right for your finger.

Example: I measured my finger at 1.75" in circumference. The no. of stitches in the pattern around that part of the finger is 18. So, since my gauge is 10 sc = 1", then 18 sc = 1.8". This is approximately the right size for my finger, with a 0.05" allowance.

Note 2: Remember that you don't want the thimble to be too tight, as it will cut off the circulation of blood to your finger. Also, you don't want it to be too loose as it will just go around your finger while you pull the yarn, and you don't want that, because you will lose the tension you create by holding the yarn in the first place.

Projects for first-time crocheters using basic stitches. Uses minimal shaping.
Projects for first-time crocheters using basic stitches. Uses minimal shaping.

Pattern

Rnd 1: Ch 2, 6 sc in 2nd ch from hook (6 sc)

Rnd 2: 2 sc in each sc around (12 sc)

Rnd 3: (Sc in next sc, 2 sc in next sc) around (18 sc)

Rnd 4: Sc in each st around (18 sc)

Keep repeating Rnd 4 until desired length is reached.

(I stopped when it reached the middle joint of my finger, which is around Rnd 22).

Fasten off and weave in ends when satisfied with the length.

Variations of Crocheter's Thimble

You can also make this for your other fingers. Because I made mine to fit the index finger, my little finger still gets yarn burn. Just use a different sized steel hook to make the size smaller or larger (depending on where you want to wear yours).

How Long Does the Thimble Last?

As with most crochet projects that go through wear and tear, this thimble does not last forever. With constant use, this thimble should last you for about 3 months. Because the yarn or thread passes by the thimble every time you crochet, it gets wear and tear from each use. Here is a photo of my first thimble with a hole in the middle:

There is now a hole in the middle of the thimble. The cotton is also showing signs of felting and sometimes goes into my new projects.
There is now a hole in the middle of the thimble. The cotton is also showing signs of felting and sometimes goes into my new projects. | Source

Since I am a frugal person, I have since learned that I should not weave in the ends for this project so I can easily frog the old thimble and reuse the still fine threads. I just throw away the felted ones or the ones that got cut from the wear and tear. Here is my second thimble as an example:

"New" thimble using 2/3 of the old thread and adding 1/3 new thread to finish.
"New" thimble using 2/3 of the old thread and adding 1/3 new thread to finish. | Source

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    • profile image

      Katherine 4 years ago

      This is just what I needed. Such a good idea!

    • JulieStrier profile image

      JulieStrier 4 years ago from Apopka, FL

      This is awesome. Not only do I get yarn burn when I crochet, but I also get thread burn from tatting, and this would work perfectly for both! Thanks again!

    • dezalyx profile image
      Author

      dezalyx 4 years ago from Philippines

      You're welcome! I just had to search what tatting is, what kinds of projects do you do with tatting? :)

    • JulieStrier profile image

      JulieStrier 4 years ago from Apopka, FL

      I'm still fairly new to tatting, so I mainly make small motifs and turn them into jewelry, like earrings or bracelets. :)

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