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Introduction to Woodworking: Art and history of woodworking.

Updated on December 18, 2011

Introduction to Woodworking :Woodworking history can be traced back to the primitive era

Introduction to Woodworking :History of woodworking

Woodworking history can be traced back to the primitive era, where ancient tribes created woodworks primarily for utilitarian uses. Most of the early woodworking crafts were utilized for survival, such as tools used for hunting and building homes.

In early civilizations, the craft of woodworking was primarily employed and utilized by the Chinese civilization and the Egyptian civilization.

Most of the early forms of woodworking were preserved in Egyptian furniture and drawings, which were preserved in Egyptian burial places.

In woodworking history, Ancient Egyptians invented the art of veneering and used varnishes whose composition is not known as finishes.

In the early Chinese civilization, "Lu Ban" and his wife "Lady Yun" were known as the originators of the craft of woodworking. They were both from the "Spring and Autumn period," an age in the Chinese history between 722 BC and 481 BC. Lu Ban's teachings in woodworking were said to be the foundation of the Chinese woodworking craft. In his book, "Manuscripts of Lu Ban," he described the correct measurements to be used when making tables, flower pots, furniture, etc.

In fact, in the history of woodworking, the Chinese' craft of woodworking was one of the famous woodwork arts because they created furniture without using the typical joining tools such as nails and glue.

As civilization developed throughout the years, human skills developed. People continued to learn more advanced techniques, strategies, and designs in woodworking, and woodworking became works of art.

As the concept of woodworking developed and expanded, many skills and practices had been developed and improved. Some of the well known skills are carpentry, parquetry, marquetry, wood carving, and cabinetry. All of these pertain to the wonderful and artistic concept of woodworking craft.

Indeed, the craft of woodworking had undergone many changes throughout history. One can surmise that the craft of woodworking isn't just a "skilled art" but can also be considered as history itself.

Woodwork Appraisal Prerequisites

The art of appraisal means being able to determine something's overall value after careful scrutiny and analysis. It is often associated with jewelry and antique dealers, who study rare and valuable items in an effort to determine what buying price those items may garner from collectors.

While there are also antique woodwork collectors, learning the necessary skills for antique woodwork appraisals isn't something you can learn overnight or even in a simple short course. It is something you need to become familiar with and gain only through practical application and experience.

However, it IS possible, with a keen eye and a few prerequisite skills, to at least be able to appraise regular woodwork. This form of appraisal doesn't really involve determining an item's price with collectors, but rather a more practical type of analysis which will allow you to determine an item's structural integrity and durability. Here are a few prerequisite skills and background knowledge you'll want to study if you intend to try your hand at woodwork appraisal.

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Knowledge of Woodworking Craft Types - aside from knowing how to work with wood and the different types of woods you can work with, you should do background studies on all of the different ways wood can be rendered into items. Don't focus on the most obvious and common applications of using wood like making furniture. Try researching the more artistic and esoteric types of woodworking, from making statues and murals, to toys, to musical instruments, to exotic weapons. Each of these different fields of woodworking will actually have their own unique needs in terms of woodworking skills and types of woods they'll use for their rendered pieces. Knowing these little nuances can help you in appraising the quality of a piece of woodwork.

Carpentry - at least a basic level of competence in carpentry as well as general woodworking is a must for woodwork appraisal. While some would argue that it is not a "hard", or necessary prerequisite, skills in working with wood are essential if you're going to be analyzing items made from it. This involves knowledge not only in working with modern power tools to render pieces of furniture, but in working with more old fashioned manual tools like straight edged and curved saws, hammers, pegs, planes, wood rasps and files, and chisels.

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Illustrated on a YouTube video

Introduction to woodworking - Learning this craft can be fun

Do you want to learn everything about wood working. Watch this funny video that will help you discover in a very entertaining way the beauty of the art of woodworking.Marc delivers solid woodworking advice with a sense of humor.

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    • bofirebear profile image

      bofirebear 

      5 years ago

      I love working with the different types of wood. It is one of my favorite things to do.

    • profile image

      ScrollSawChuck 

      6 years ago

      You have a lot of information here, and I appreciate it very much. It is amazing how many different applications there are to working in wood.

    • tabletalk profile image

      tabletalk 

      7 years ago

      Hello Hector. Glad you have a site like this. Well done. Looks like you have a wealth of information here! I just published my first book recently about making a wood coffee table, and I just created my first lens yesterday. Now I'm just squidding my way around here. Hope you have a chance to see my new lens. I'm looking for comments or suggestions about it. Thank you. BigK

    • profile image

      MonikasPiecko 

      7 years ago

      I like your blog on the history of woodworking , Very informative.

      It's always nice to learn something new

    • profile image

      dmaynard71 

      7 years ago

      Thanks for the video on turning between centers, it was a real help. I was wondering if you know if there are any better

    • profile image

      zoniescall 

      7 years ago

      Hey there,

      I'm thinking of going into woodworking and I am trying to find a guide that has detailed woodworking projects plans.any suggestions.

      Thanks,

    • rewards4life info profile image

      rewards4life info 

      7 years ago

      Very nice lens, I had a go at woodworking many years ago and was thinking about taking it up as a hobby. What a great resource you have provided. Thank you for some inspiration.

    • dedolex profile image

      dedolex 

      7 years ago

      Nice lens. I love everything woodworking!

    • profile image

      anonymous 

      7 years ago

      I have taught myself a little woodworking. I only make outdoor furniture so people can't tell that the item leans to one side. I do adore playing with wood though.

    • profile image

      fReEdOmLiFe 

      7 years ago

      This is a great. Thanks for making it. Very informative. I gave you a thumbs up.

      I like your.Thanks for the recommendations.

      Request permission Recommended my site.

      Thai wood carving

    • turner-bob profile image

      turner-bob 

      7 years ago

      Very nice!

    • profile image

      wwiii12364 

      8 years ago

      get great

    • profile image

      wwiii12364 

      8 years ago

      great article. i am a cabinet maker by trade and i think you nailed it with this write up.nice job. oh hey if you need any

    • AppalachianCoun profile image

      AppalachianCoun 

      8 years ago

      Wow, thank-you for this great detail. We enjoy the beauty of wood. It is neat to see a bowl being made. Nice lens.

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