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Make a Crochet Edged Fleece Blanket

Updated on June 15, 2013

Love crochet? Love fleece? Make a blanket that's a perfect mix!

Over the past year, I've noticed more crochet edged crafts becoming popular. And why not? Sometimes you don't want to do an entire project in crochet, but a lacy edge is fun. Here's your chance to craft one especially useful item with little effort.

Crocheting around the edge of fleece is a versatile way to make a gift that's quick, inexpensive, and personal. With so many wonderful fleece fabrics and yarns to choose from, the hardest part may be making a choice and moving forward!

Learn all the steps you need to design your own crocheted fleece blanket, pillow, or other fun accessory.

You can make this beautiful blanket!

You can make this beautiful blanket!
You can make this beautiful blanket!

First, you'll need fleece

Start with a piece of fleece the size and shape you want to make your blanket. You can do a large or small blanket. Smaller pieces are great for baby blankets, and you can even make it round or heart shaped. With so many fun fleece patterns, you can craft an afghan for anyone. Amazon carries this and much more! Just click through to search for more fun fleece.

Find yarn to match

Find a yarn with a weight and style you like, that coordinates with your fleece.

Lily Sugar 'N Cream Yarn, 2 Ounce, Jewels, Single Ball
Lily Sugar 'N Cream Yarn, 2 Ounce, Jewels, Single Ball

Jewel tone yarns look great as trim on neutral blankets. You can even get started with a fleece blanket you buy at Walmart!

 
Deborah Norville Serenity Chunky DN500-01 Almond (3 Ounce; 109 Yards) by Premier Yarns
Deborah Norville Serenity Chunky DN500-01 Almond (3 Ounce; 109 Yards) by Premier Yarns

Tone down a wild print with a chunky border in a speckled neutral pattern.

 
Ultra Fine 12" Wool Roving 8-Pack: Autumn 2 Oz.
Ultra Fine 12" Wool Roving 8-Pack: Autumn 2 Oz.

Make each row a different coordinating color for a festive border.

 
Lily Sugar'n Cream Yarn: Solids, Soft Teal
Lily Sugar'n Cream Yarn: Solids, Soft Teal

A simple solid will finish off a baby blanket with a soft touch.

 

More supplies you'll need

The supply list for this project really is short and simple, and you probably have most of the supplies at home.

Susan Bates Silvalume Crochet Hook Set in Pouch Sizes F, G, H, I, J, K
Susan Bates Silvalume Crochet Hook Set in Pouch Sizes F, G, H, I, J, K

Of course, you'll need a crochet hook to fit your yarn. If you want a large lacy design, use a larger hook and thinner yarn. For a thick, fluffy border, use thick yarn and a hook to fit.

 
Fiskars 3-Inch-by-18-inch Clear Acrylic Quilting Ruler
Fiskars 3-Inch-by-18-inch Clear Acrylic Quilting Ruler

An acrylic ruler will help you mark holes for your punches or stitches, depending on which method you choose.

 
Singer Dual Point Disappearing Ink Marking Pen, Purple Ink
Singer Dual Point Disappearing Ink Marking Pen, Purple Ink

A disappearing ink marking pen will help you draw dots that won't cause permanent spots on your work.

 
Fiskars 12-94227097 5-Inch Blunt Softgrip Scissors
Fiskars 12-94227097 5-Inch Blunt Softgrip Scissors

I keep a pair of short, sharp scissors in my bag for snipping fleece and yarn.

 

Select and prepare your fleece and yarn

Click thumbnail to view full-size
For my first blankets I picked up a half-price remnant. Even though it's a remnant, it's plenty big enough for two baby blankets. Yay!I found these two skeins of yarn to coordinate with my fleece. I couldn't decide, so......I got both! I found out one skein was JUST enough for my basic rows and shell pattern so I lucked out.To square up my fleece I folded it, smoothed it out, and then used an acrylic ruler and rotary cutter to cut the edges.Here I have perfectly squared fleece! All ready to start.
For my first blankets I picked up a half-price remnant. Even though it's a remnant, it's plenty big enough for two baby blankets. Yay!
For my first blankets I picked up a half-price remnant. Even though it's a remnant, it's plenty big enough for two baby blankets. Yay!
I found these two skeins of yarn to coordinate with my fleece. I couldn't decide, so...
I found these two skeins of yarn to coordinate with my fleece. I couldn't decide, so...
...I got both! I found out one skein was JUST enough for my basic rows and shell pattern so I lucked out.
...I got both! I found out one skein was JUST enough for my basic rows and shell pattern so I lucked out.
To square up my fleece I folded it, smoothed it out, and then used an acrylic ruler and rotary cutter to cut the edges.
To square up my fleece I folded it, smoothed it out, and then used an acrylic ruler and rotary cutter to cut the edges.
Here I have perfectly squared fleece! All ready to start.
Here I have perfectly squared fleece! All ready to start.

Which "punching" method will you choose?

While I was testing my anchor border (the first row attached to the fleece blanket) I found out a few things about working with fleece and making holes in it. I came up with three generally acceptable ways to create your anchor row without having it rip out of the side of the fleece.

  1. Use a dashed/perforated rotary cutter made for fabric.

    This is the fastest method and used by many crafters. Simple score around each edge, no closer than 1/4" from the edge, then start crocheting through each slit.

  2. Use a 1/16" hole punch spaced no closer together than 1/4".

    The first two blankets I made were done with a hole punch. Then you simply crochet through each hole to start your anchor row.

  3. Use a blanket stitch.

    This will take a little longer but leaves a pretty finished edge and can be done without a lot of extra tools. My next blanket will use a blanket stitch.

Pick your "punch"

Besides fleece and yarn, you'll need either a rotary cutter, hole punch, or large yarn needle to start the point where your yarn will connect to your fleece.

Simplicity Deluxe Rotary Blade, Slit Edge
Simplicity Deluxe Rotary Blade, Slit Edge

The fastest way to create your border is to use a perforating rotary blade (skip stitch) to score the edges.

 
Fiskars 1/16 Inch Hand Punch, Circle
Fiskars 1/16 Inch Hand Punch, Circle

To create holes any distance or depth, use a 1/16th inch hole punch.

 
Susan Bates Steel Yarn Knitting Needle, 2-Inch, 5 Per Package
Susan Bates Steel Yarn Knitting Needle, 2-Inch, 5 Per Package

If you prefer to blanket stitch around your fleece, use a sturdy metal yarn needle.

 

Technique 1: Cut your holes with a skip stitch rotary tool

Click thumbnail to view full-size
The perforated rotary blade will help you cut a dashed line near the edge of the fleece so you can crochet through it.As you can see my rotary cutter has more cutting surface than blank space. The skip stitch blade sold above will do a better job of leaving more fleece attached so your crocheted edge doesn't break through.Use the blade like any other rotary cutter. Line up your ruler no less than 1/4" from the edge and score.Here you can see the scored line. You're ready to start!
The perforated rotary blade will help you cut a dashed line near the edge of the fleece so you can crochet through it.
The perforated rotary blade will help you cut a dashed line near the edge of the fleece so you can crochet through it.
As you can see my rotary cutter has more cutting surface than blank space. The skip stitch blade sold above will do a better job of leaving more fleece attached so your crocheted edge doesn't break through.
As you can see my rotary cutter has more cutting surface than blank space. The skip stitch blade sold above will do a better job of leaving more fleece attached so your crocheted edge doesn't break through.
Use the blade like any other rotary cutter. Line up your ruler no less than 1/4" from the edge and score.
Use the blade like any other rotary cutter. Line up your ruler no less than 1/4" from the edge and score.
Here you can see the scored line. You're ready to start!
Here you can see the scored line. You're ready to start!

Technique 2: Punch your way around the edges

Click thumbnail to view full-size
Use an acrylic ruler to measure in no less than 1/4". On future blankets I'll try at least 3/8", to make the border sturdier.Here I've used a Sharpie to mark each hole but to avoid permanent marks, next time I'll use a gel pen or disappearing ink quilting pen. When punching holes, keep them at least 1/4" apart width-wise. This will help prevent your fabric from becoming weFinally, use a 1/16" hole punch to punch your holes. I tried it with a 1/8th" punch and found it too big. The fleece became weak and tore. Once you've punched all the way around, you can start stitching!
Use an acrylic ruler to measure in no less than 1/4". On future blankets I'll try at least 3/8", to make the border sturdier.
Use an acrylic ruler to measure in no less than 1/4". On future blankets I'll try at least 3/8", to make the border sturdier.
Here I've used a Sharpie to mark each hole but to avoid permanent marks, next time I'll use a gel pen or disappearing ink quilting pen. When punching holes, keep them at least 1/4" apart width-wise. This will help prevent your fabric from becoming we
Here I've used a Sharpie to mark each hole but to avoid permanent marks, next time I'll use a gel pen or disappearing ink quilting pen. When punching holes, keep them at least 1/4" apart width-wise. This will help prevent your fabric from becoming we
Finally, use a 1/16" hole punch to punch your holes. I tried it with a 1/8th" punch and found it too big. The fleece became weak and tore. Once you've punched all the way around, you can start stitching!
Finally, use a 1/16" hole punch to punch your holes. I tried it with a 1/8th" punch and found it too big. The fleece became weak and tore. Once you've punched all the way around, you can start stitching!

Technique 3: Learn how to blanket stitch

The blanket stitch looks tricky but is simple to learn and master. It will help you stitch around the edge of your fleece and create a framework for your crocheted border.

Start stitching!

Click thumbnail to view full-size
On this sample I started near the edge, but on your real piece, start several inches away from a corner, or near the middle. Corners are awkward places to hide transitions to a new level, and can become bulky.Simply pull your yarn through a hole to start. I prefer not to knot it, and to work the tail end through the finished work later.Start with a single crochet just as if the fleece were a row of its own.Continue on around the edge of the fleece, making two extra stitches in each corner hole to round the bend.Almost there...A perfect foundation row!
On this sample I started near the edge, but on your real piece, start several inches away from a corner, or near the middle. Corners are awkward places to hide transitions to a new level, and can become bulky.
On this sample I started near the edge, but on your real piece, start several inches away from a corner, or near the middle. Corners are awkward places to hide transitions to a new level, and can become bulky.
Simply pull your yarn through a hole to start. I prefer not to knot it, and to work the tail end through the finished work later.
Simply pull your yarn through a hole to start. I prefer not to knot it, and to work the tail end through the finished work later.
Start with a single crochet just as if the fleece were a row of its own.
Start with a single crochet just as if the fleece were a row of its own.
Continue on around the edge of the fleece, making two extra stitches in each corner hole to round the bend.
Continue on around the edge of the fleece, making two extra stitches in each corner hole to round the bend.
Almost there...
Almost there...
A perfect foundation row!
A perfect foundation row!

Make the sample! It has four rows.

For the two blankets I made, I did a single crochet all around the blanket in the holes I punched.

Then I made a row of double crochet and spaces. I double crocheted (dc) in one hole, dc in the next, then chained one and skipped a hole. Then I started over, so the row consists of dc, dc, chain 1 skip 1, dc, dc, chain 1 skip 1, etc.

Then I did a row of single crochet to widen the distance between the dc row and the shell edging.

Finally I did a shell edging with three double crochets. To do a shell, skip a stitch, double crochet three times in the same hole, then skip a stitch and single crochet. Then repeat.

When you get to corners, do two extra stitches to get around the corner, so you're doing one stitch for the right side, one for the corner, and one for the left side. When you do decorative stitches, add a few extra stitches or chains to get around the corner. Don't worry that the pattern isn't right, just make it work for wherever you end up. When you get around the corner, start it up again.

Crocheted Border Patterns

If you're not familiar with borders, get some tips from other crafters and combine borders to create your own masterpiece.

Crochet Fabulous Edges on Anything

Around the Corner Crochet Borders: 150 Colorful, Creative Edging Designs with Charts and Instructions for Turning the Corner Perfectly Every Time
Around the Corner Crochet Borders: 150 Colorful, Creative Edging Designs with Charts and Instructions for Turning the Corner Perfectly Every Time

If crocheting on fleece is addicting for you as it has become for me, you'll love this book with 150 crocheted borders you can combine to make any width of border in thousands of color combinations and styles.

 

Crochet on Fleece Instructions

For a video encompassing directions from cut to finish, start here.

You can make this too!

You can make this too!
You can make this too!

I'm on Pinterest!

Repin this and find other goodies.

Fleece can be expensive and hard to find, and if you don't live near a fabric store it's hard to hit up sales. Fabric.com has the fleece you're looking for, all the time, in dozens of patterns and styles.

Here are a few of my favs:

All sorts of super heroes for the boys. Boys want to be snuggly warm too.

Test your crochet skills on a dog blanket. Just pick your pooch's favorite accent color for the border. Or, try a pillowcase style bed.

Football games can be chilly! Search for your favorite pro and college sports teams, along with general sports patterns.

Stitch a blanket fit for a princess or any other type of girly girl with a variety of licensed and designer styles.

Thanks for stopping by to share your thoughts!

What do you think?

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    • profile image

      Liz A 15 months ago

      I haave purchased the skip-cut Rotary Cutter Blade and have tried to use it on fleece that I purchased and the fleece actually pulls apart. What am I doing wrong? Anybody else have any problem like this and how do I correct it?

    • profile image

      Dechen 2 years ago

      I am new at trying this and need a bit of advice. I am using the skip stitch rotary tool and just to be on the safe side I perforated one inch from the edge. When I started crocheting (in the middle of a side not a corner) the entire side ripped off. So I re prepped my edges and tried it again. I did it the same leaving one inch from perf to edge. Same result. Am I doing something wrong?

    • RTalloni profile image

      RTalloni 2 years ago from the short journey

      These chunky edgings on fleece would be fun and fast to get creative with, and they could be such warm, pretty gifts.

    • Cynthia Haltom profile image

      Cynthia Haltom 4 years ago from Diamondhead

      Love fleece blanket with crocheted edging,

    • ItayaLightbourne profile image

      Itaya Lightbourne 4 years ago from Topeka, KS

      I crocheted around a pale green and white plaid piece of fleece some years ago and saved it for my first grandchild. It was the perfect size and weight and they loved it. I believe I used an ice pick to punch my holes. Not the easiest way to do it but it worked just fine. I like your idea of doing a foundation blanket stitch. Think I will do that next time. GREAT article! :)

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      @anonymous: Happened to me too. I ended up getting the original Skip Stitch blade also.

    • profile image

      DebMartin 4 years ago

      Great idea. I always have leftover yarn and crochet cotton. Now I'll just use it to make a blanket. Thanks. d

    • Joan Haines profile image

      Joan Haines 4 years ago

      What I like most is that I can make this fairly quickly. I know how to crochet, but I have little patience. Perfect!

    • Genjud profile image

      Genjud 4 years ago

      I forgot about doing this. A number of years ago I taught knitting and crocheting at Michael's. I had a lady that wanted to learn to crochet edges on flannel for receiving blankets. We used a winged sewing machine needle to stitch the holes and crochet cotton for the crocheting. They turned out beautiful. Great Baby Gift! Thanks for the great site.

    • profile image

      miaponzo 4 years ago

      OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO I absolutely LOVE that blanket!!!!!! Blessed!

    • Brandi Bush profile image

      Brandi 4 years ago from Maryland

      Wow, I can't believe how much that edgework adds to the simple fleece baby blanket! Very pretty! :)

    • heartycindypen profile image

      Hearty Cindy Penaranda 4 years ago from Ormoc City

      NIce, I've tried this idea and made a bag with it..

    • profile image

      gradientcat 4 years ago

      I haven't tried crocheting on fleece before, looks fun.

    • profile image

      getmoreinfo 4 years ago

      This Crochet Edged Fleece Blanket is nice.

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      I tried using the Olfa skip stitch blade shown on your site, and the edges of the fabric ripped off - the punches were too close together. I got a larger blade from the original Skip Stitch web site, and that worked well. There needs to be enough fabric between the holes so the fabric doesn't tear out. Beautiful designs! My next blanket will be based on your two-tone pink design. Thanks for sharing.

    • amandascloset0 profile image

      amandascloset0 4 years ago

      Thanks for posting this.. I'll be trying this out 'Very' soon. I do a lot of crochet and lot of sewing. Never thought of combining the two like this! Great idea!

    • SusanDeppner profile image

      Susan Deppner 5 years ago from Arkansas USA

      Beautiful blanket! I could do that, too. We've had a cooler day today (windows open!) and I'm getting in the mood for some warm fall crafts!

    • scrapquilter profile image

      Myreda Johnson 5 years ago from Ohio USA

      I really want to try this. You have given very complete and clear instructions. These blankets would make great gifts.

    • WildFacesGallery profile image

      Mona 5 years ago from Iowa

      What a wonderful way to add a personal touch to a fleece blanket. Blessed.