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10 Ways to Improve Artistic Productivity

Updated on March 6, 2017
Robie Benve profile image

Robie is an artist who believes in the power of positive thinking. She loves sharing art tips and bringing people joy through her paintings.

How to Become Artistically Productive

Even the most imaginative people occasionally struggle to express their inner creativity.

Artists usually like to create as much as possible, but everyone seems to complain about how life gets in the way, and how hard it is to make time for be creative.

The following 10 strategies can help you boost your creativity.

Productivity is as important as creativity for an artist

10 Ways to overcome mental block and boost both creativity and productivity.
10 Ways to overcome mental block and boost both creativity and productivity. | Source

10 Tips to Increase Artistic Productivity

In Short:

1. Keep Your Supplies Organized and Readily Available

2. Minimize Computer Time, Spend As Much Time As You Can Working on Your Projects

3. Plan Your Activities in Advance

4. Analyze Your Habits and Determine Priorities, then Cut Off the Biggest Time Wasters

5. Do Things When It Works for You

6. Consider Everything an Experiment

7. Work, Work, Work

8. Take a Break When You Feel Burned Out

9. Keep All Rules Flexible

10. Love What You Do, Do What You Love


Each tip is explained in detail below.


1. Keep Your Supplies Organized and Readily Available

The time you get to be in your studio and create is precious. You need to treat it as such.

Finding all the supplies organized and available saves a lot of time and distraction, and allows you to get straight to work on your project, without losing the inspiration.

Save some time at the end of every session to put things back where they belong, clean up brushes and tools, store hazardous material. It will speed up your process next time you are in the studio.

2. Minimize Computer Time, Spend As Much Time As You Can Working on Your Projects

Create a schedule and a time limit for how long you spend on the computer. It’s unbelievable how much time social networks, emails, and computer activities in general can eat up.

If I'm not careful, I spend more time in front of a screen than in front of a canvas every day.

Set a timer. Before you start doing anything on the computer, decide how much time you want to allow yourself, set a timer, then stop when the timer goes off.

Another way to make sure I only do that one thing I need to do (i.e. checking my email) and don’t get sucked into the web tentacles is to be in an unconfortable position. Like standing at a low table, or laying on the couch with my legs up. Yeah, sometimes I say “I can only be on my phone as long as I am burning some abs calories keeping my legs up. Then I have to quit,”

Nothing is less productive than to make more efficient what should not be done at all.

— Peter Drucker

Follow Your Inspiration, Be Creative, Take Chances, Make Mistakes!

Don't be afraid of making mistakes. Each mistake teaches you something.
Don't be afraid of making mistakes. Each mistake teaches you something. | Source

What is Your Roadblock?

What's keeping you from a high artistic productivity?

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3. Plan Your Activities in Advance

Another big waste of energy in the studio is when you have a slot of time to be creative, and you find yourself scrambling to get things started.

For example, if I know I have time to paint in the morning, it helps a lot if the night before I have already decided what subject I am going to paint, on what size canvas, and I have my supplies ready to go.

If I wait until I wake up to plan my activity, I find myself wasting a lot of time deciding which reference photo to use, or setting up a still life (that alone can take hours!), finding a canvas of the right dimensions, getting my paint out - oops, my palette is a mess, I need to clean it before I start - let’s set my easel up, etc.

If I do all of that before going to bed, I wake up with a stronger motivation because I know all I need to do is go to the studio and start painting.

Until we can manage time, we can manage nothing else.

— Peter Drucker

4. Analyze Your Habits and Determine Priorities - Cut Off the Biggest Wastes of Time

Take a good look at how you use your time every day. How much do you spend on each activity? This may require some note taking.
Reading the news, social networking, exercising, eating, watching TV, taking care of family, everything.

Look at every single thing you do, and determine if it is a good habit or a bad habit.

What’s more important, what is a waste of your time and should be kept at a minimum?

Knowing your low priority and highly distracting activities, will help you recognize them and limit them, hence using your time more efficiently.

Amateurs sit and wait for inspiration, the rest of us just get up and go to work.

— Stephen King

5. Do Things at a Time that Works for You

Match the right activities with the physical and mental energy that you have in different times of the day.

I am not a morning person. I have the social skills of a grizzly bear for about an hour after I wake up, no matter what time that is. In the afternoon I perk up and could do all kinds of things.
I learned to keep my high energy activities for later in the day. I am most productive creatively after 10am, up to late night.

A friend of mine wakes up at 4 o’clock am to train for the marathon before her kids get up and her work day starts. Waking up before sunrise and go running? Not on my book. But it works for her. The trick is to find what works for you.

The key is not to prioritize what’s on your schedule, but to schedule your priorities.

— Stephen Covey

Follow Your Inspiration, Be Creative, Take Chances, Make Mistakes!

6. Consider Everything an Experiment

Nothing is a mistake, there is no right or wrong idea, only creativity.

Don’t worry about what the final results will be, if someone will like it or if you’ll even hate it, follow your inspiration, be creative, take chances, make mistakes; it will get you going.

Be creative. Keep fun on, and boredom off.


If it's not perfect, do it again. That's why having time available is so important. You don't need to feel like that's your only chance to get something done, so it better be perfect. We all make mistakes, and they are our best teachers.

Productivity Must Haves: Motivation and Discipline

The most important things to bring into the studio are Motivation and Discipline. When you have a strong motivation to create, everything else becomes less important. But you need to discipline yourself and avoid the time wasters. Create a schedule, and stick to it.

7. Work, Work, Work

Show up in the studio and get busy, even on days you don’t feel like it.

It’s not about making the best artwork of the century, it’s about creating as much as possible, learning from mistakes, trying new things.

Do a lot, create a lot, work a lot, and you’ll become better and faster at it, whatever your discipline is.

There is no substitute for hard work.

— Thomas Edison
Creativity Quote
Creativity Quote | Source

8. Take a Break When You Feel Burned Out

Ultimately you are the only one that really knows how your creativity works.

If you feel like you need a break, take one.

Do something relaxing, possibly an outdoor activity like a walk in the neighborhood, some gardening, or a jog at the park.

Walking away from your artwork will also serve you to see it with fresh eyes when you come back, and see exactly what the next steps need to be.

9. Keep All Rules Flexible

These tips come from my personal experience, and I can tell you they sound like simple things to do, but I get caught in the trap of disregarding them time and time again, and my creativity drops. I have to be constantly checking if the bad habits a re sneaking in.

The most important things to bring into the studio are motivation and discipline. When you have strong motivation to create, everything else becomes less important. But you need to discipline yourself and avoid the temptations. Create a schedule, and stick to it.

Of course the schedule needs to be flexible, and adapt to your changing needs or special events in your agenda.

Productivity is being able to do things that you were never able to do before.

— Franz Kafka
There are no fixed rules in art.
There are no fixed rules in art. | Source

10. Love What You Do, Do What You Love

When you do something you have true passion for, it's easier to find motivation and discipline.

Do what makes you happy, follow your true passions, taking full advantage of the time you have for creating, making every minute count.

Your passion for what you do is ultimately the fuel that lets you work hard at it and be successful.

© 2014 Robie Benve

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    • Robie Benve profile image
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      Robie Benve 18 months ago from Ohio

      Oh Litany, perfectionism can be quite a stopper for artists! The important thing is that you continue creating, even if you don't let other people see you work (yet).

      I am not a perfectionist, but as all artists I am my worse critic. I found that many times I don't like the final result, so I set that work aside. When I go back to the "hidden" portfolio after months or years, I surprisingly discover that some pieces were not bad at all! : )

      It takes some detachment to truly critique your own work.

      The same way things that I thought were brilliant may look meh after a while. It's a risk worth taking. :)

    • Litany Notch profile image

      Litany Notch 18 months ago from South UK

      My main problem with productivity is perfectionism! Although I mainly create digital art and crafts rather than paintings, I never think that my work is good enough to allow other people to see it.

    • Glenn Stok profile image

      Glenn Stok 2 years ago from Long Island, NY

      I used to create doodles when I was young. For some reason I stopped doing that. Maybe because I turned towards writing instead.

      Nevertheless, I became interested in your hub's title because of my prior artistic activities. As I read your hub, I realize that your list of strategies can apply to any creative endeavor... Drawing, writing, designing, even working out the solution to one's problems.

      No matter what it is, I find myself most productive when I plan my activities in advance, which was one of your strategies.

    • Robie Benve profile image
      Author

      Robie Benve 2 years ago from Ohio

      Hi CherylsArt, yes I found that getting my supplies (and the idea of what to paint) ready the night before makes me much more productive in the studio. Thanks and have a great and creative day!

    • CherylsArt profile image

      Cheryl Paton 2 years ago from West Virginia

      You've mentioned some useful and helpful tips here. I like the idea of getting some of the supplies together the night before, to encourage motivation. : )

    • Robie Benve profile image
      Author

      Robie Benve 2 years ago from Ohio

      I hear you Dbro: let me check facebook just one more time" got me in trouble many times! lol

      Thanks a lot for you kind and interesting feedback. Cheers to many wonderful days of creative productivity to come! :)

    • Dbro profile image

      Dbro 2 years ago from Texas, USA

      Robie! I LOVE this hub! This is all such good advice. As an artist, I recognize myself in so many of these time wasting habits. I truly love what I do, so I can overcome them most of the time, but your tips on motivation and self-discipline are so helpful and spot-on. My biggest time waster these days is too much "screen time." I think it's a temptation for most people to "check Face Book one more time..."

      Thanks for this inspiring hub. I'm sure it will help me be more prolific as an artist and just plain have more fun!

    • Robie Benve profile image
      Author

      Robie Benve 2 years ago from Ohio

      Very true, billybuc it applies to writers too. In fact writers are artists of words. Happy writing! :)

    • billybuc profile image

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      The same rules apply for writers. Very good synopsis of what it takes, besides talent of course, to be successful in the Arts.