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How to Make Your Own Postcards

Updated on January 15, 2015

Use Discarded Boxes to Make Your Own Postcards

Create your own postcards with discarded boxes to make personalized postcards like none other. Recycling is a great way to enjoy things again and again!

I've been doing a little rearranging and Spring cleaning. I am in the pitching mood, which rarely strikes, so I take advantage of it when it does. I had saved a couple of Lego boxes that my grandkids didn't want. They wanted the Legos!

So, I decided I didn't need the Lego boxes either. I was just about to take a Lego farm set box to the recycling dumpster when I glanced at the colorful graphics of the Lego mini-figure farmers, pigs, and cool farm equipment one last time.

Some of the little pictures on the back of the box looked like a perfect postcard size. The light bulb went on! I had to make postcards with these images! Yes, I had to!

Photo Credit: Peggy Hazelwood

Find a Great Box - Boxes with Great Graphics Make Great Postcards

The Lego box I used to make my own postcards.
The Lego box I used to make my own postcards.

This Lego box was destined for the dumpster, but luckily I rescued it.

First, find a box with some images you think would make fun postcards. Then find the seam that is glued and loosen it with your fingers or a table knife.

Flatten the box completely so it looks similar to the one shown above.

Use a Postcard as a Template

Use a postcard as a template.
Use a postcard as a template.

Look around and find a postcard you have on hand to use as a template. (Check the fridge or a junk drawer or wherever you put your mail.)

Find an image or words on the box that you want to use as your postcard. Deciding on the image is the fun part!

Lightly trace around the border of the postcard with an ink pen then lift the postcard. If needed use a ruler and pen again to darken the line.

Cut Out the Postcard

Cut out the postcard.
Cut out the postcard.

Carefully cut out the postcard by cutting along the line. Stay outside the line if needed then clean up the edges later.

As you can see in this photo, I started cutting part of the box to make a postcard. Since this box is heavy, it was sort of hard. I had to clean up the edges after I cut it out completely.

More Supplies to Make Postcards

Adults may want to use an X-acto knife and mat to cut the postcards. X-acto knives are not recommended for use by children.

A fun way to dress up your postcards is to fold decorative Washi tape around the edge of the postcard similar to how bias tape is used on fabric. This decorative element will eliminate any flaws like jagged edges or uneven cuts. And it looks great!

Postcard Sizes

Smallest Size a Postcard Can Be:

3-1/2 inches (88.9 mm) tall X 5 inches (127 mm) long

X 0.007 inches (0.178 mm) thick

Largest Size a Postcard Can Be:

4-1/4 inches (108 mm) tall X 6 inches (152.4 mm) long X 0.016 inches (0.406 mm) thick

Make One of a Kind Postcards

Make One of a Kind Postcards
Make One of a Kind Postcards

Make Quilted Postcards - A Great Way to Make Memorable, Lasting Quilt That You Can Mail

Send Postcards to Family and Friends

Make someone's day. How? Mail them a postcard!

If you know of an elderly person who seldom gets visitors, sending them a postcard every few weeks or once a month will surely brighten their day.

Kids love to get mail addressed to them.

Mail postcards you've made from food boxes!

Watercolor Postcards - Paint Your Own Postcards

If you are on vacation or home from a trip and want to replicate an amazing sunset, give it a try by painting on these watercolor postcards.

What would be better than making postcards of your memories from vacation?

Then send the postards out! Wait for the oohs and aahs.

Postcard Facts

Deltiology is what the study and collecting

of postcards is called.

Postcards made from a Fiddle Faddle box and a whipped topping box.
Postcards made from a Fiddle Faddle box and a whipped topping box.

Use Your Grocery Boxes to Make Postcards

Use What's on Hand

To keep this easy craft free as well, use the boxes you have on hand. After you empty a cereal box or a box from macaroni and cheese, consider cutting out a postcard then recycling the rest of the box.

I mail these postcards to family and friends who will get a hoot out of them!

Affiliate Disclosure

This author, Peggy Hazelwood, participates in Amazon, eBay, All Posters, and other affiliate advertising programs. When you click an advertising link on this page and make a purchase, I receive a small percent of the sale. Thank you for reading this far!

Will You Make Your Own Postcards? - What Box Do You Have in Mind?

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    • Gypzeerose profile image

      Rose Jones 

      5 years ago

      I just love this lens. (I had run out of likes - that is why I couldn't push the button.) Pinned to my letter writing board. You might be interested in Ruthi's Facebook group - postcard fans from the Squid only.

    • Virginia Allain profile image

      Virginia Allain 

      5 years ago from Central Florida

      I hadn't thought to do this with a box. Clever.

      I do cut postcards from greeting cards. Usually just cut off the back part and let the front serve as a card. I even found a rubber stamp that says POSTCARD in old style lettering and I stamp that on the blank side.

    • profile image

      bossypants 

      5 years ago

      As a recipient of one of these swell cards, I can confirm they are a hoot to receive! Such a clever, one-of-a-kind treasure to find in my mailbox! Thanks, Scarlett! :)

    • profile image

      Ruthi 

      5 years ago

      What a terrific idea of turning trash into treasure! I would love to receive a handmade postcard made from what would have been a discarded box.

    • profile image

      tomoxby 

      5 years ago

      Such a simple idea, so easy to create your own postcard, who knew? I will give it a try.

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