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How to Make Your Own Wax Crayons

Updated on June 20, 2014

Crayons From Left Over Candle Wax

If you hate waste and like recycling, this should be of interest, especially if you have young children.

I've created some lenses demonstrating the use of left over candle wax, and came across this by accident, when I was making my own encaustic - wax mixed with powder pigments.

I also tried adding oil paint to hot wax, this too was successful, but it wasn't until the wax had set hard, that I found you could use it for crayons.

After making them and not knowing the outcome, I have done some simple drawings and then coloured them in to prove that they do work and kids can have fun (supervised).

Because the theme is recycling, I have used things that I had around the home, but even if you don't have everything, the tools and materials are of little expense.

Image source - shearart

Image Shearart
Image Shearart

What You Will Need

Some old bits of candles or a cheap candle that you can crumble.

Artist oil paint small amount for each crayon. You will need the amount that would cover your thumb nail.

Muffin tins.

Thin plastic tubes - I used Smarties sweat tubes, they can be square, well any shape as long as it is sealed at one end .

Hob or electric hot plate/griddle.

You can also use the double boil method as shown in the picture - bowl of boiling water, place your tin of crumpled wax inside and melt.

Image Shearart
Image Shearart

Sequencing

Protect the surface you are working on with paper towels or newspaper.

First crumble wax into a muffin tin to the top, this will melt down to about two thirds of the tin.

Heat the wax using your chosen method.

When the wax is melted squeeze out a thumb nail size amount of paint onto the back of a teaspoon and stir in slowly so as not to splash the wax. More paint can be added but not too much.

Stand your plastic containers upright and support then.

Using a pair of grips or pliers grasp the tin and pour into the plastic container.

Wait 15 minutes, reheat what is left in the muffin tin and pour again into the plastic container/crayon mould as the wax would of shrunk.

Leave to harden.

Finally resist the urge to try them on paper yourself they are for the children - remember?

I have included pictures below.

Haven't got them around the house? You can buy here.

Finished Crayons

Image Shearart
Image Shearart

Sequencing Images

Click thumbnail to view full-size

Simple drawing demonstration using home made crayons

Click thumbnail to view full-size
This is more advanced but if you heat a pallet knife on the griddle the wax can be melted and smoothed out the beginnings of Encaustic paint.
This is more advanced but if you heat a pallet knife on the griddle the wax can be melted and smoothed out the beginnings of Encaustic paint.
This is more advanced but if you heat a pallet knife on the griddle the wax can be melted and smoothed out the beginnings of Encaustic paint.

You can pour one colour into the mould and another to make a duel coloured crayon

Comments Welcome

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    • kabbalah lm profile image

      kabbalah lm 4 years ago

      I really do admire your artistic cababilities

    • GregoryMoore profile image

      Gregory Moore 5 years ago from Louisville, KY

      My kids do this with all of their old left over crayon pieces. They make new swirled crayons and love coloring with them more than the new ones.

    • profile image

      aquarian_insight 5 years ago

      This is a great lens with brilliant instructions on how to make your own crayons. Featured on my 'Inexpensive Christmas Gift Ideas For the Cash-Strapped' lens.