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Keeping Alive Black and White Film Photography

Updated on April 14, 2013

Keeping Alive Black and White Film Photography: The Beauty of Heavy Metal Cameras

This article focuses on those of us who love black and white film photography. It shows how the subject has been kept 'alive' by enthusiasts who love the whole aspect of working with a fully-mechanical 35mm camera. Indeed, there are many of us who are sick of the tidal wave of digitized photos that have become a plethora and a staple diet of those who know nothing about the history of photography - or how it all began.

And so, for those people who would have been thinking about using a mechanically-driven camera for their photographic needs, then never has there been a better time. Because of the new technology - which comprises of High-Definition and Digital technologies - quality mechanical cameras can be bought at record low prices.

This is a fantastic opportunity for those people who would love to get back to basics, to purchase a film camera, and feel that you are holding something, instead of a piece of plastic and computer chips. After all, 35mm Single Lens Reflex Cameras - and even Twin Lens Reflex film Cameras - were built to last. If you love photography, and you are a keen amateur, purchase a re-conditioned mechanical-driven film camera. You will not regret your buy.

Keeping Alive Black and White Film Photography

The Beauty of Heavy Metal Cameras

In this age of High-Definition, digital cameras, using film cameras has now become, obsolete. After all, why would anyone use a 35mm film camera? There are plenty of digital, high-tech cameras around which can more or less do the same job.

However, there are bonuses to using 35mm film cameras - not least because of the prices now. With the changeover in technology from film to digital, there are fantastic single lens reflex film cameras to be had, for bargain prices.

After all, why buy plastic when you can purchase metal for half the value of what they once where? With digital cameras, I always feel that I am holding nothing at all. They are simply too light for my liking. Digital cameras always feel 'cheap' to me - which is why I am such an enthusiast for SLR mechanical-driven film cameras. I like to know I am 'holding' something.

They are built to last,they are rugged, and they certainly do last. This is in stark contrast to digital cameras, with all of their fancy computerized technology. They simply do not do it for those of us who love our mechanical cameras.

The fact remains that there are plenty of us out there who love our film cameras. So much so that we are loath to change over to digital, and embrace the new technology. And long may that be so.

The huge-market share that digital cameras possess now, in virtually taking over everything - in reference to photography - has resulted in film cameras being sold at bargain prices. Film cameras are old technology, and so stores are eager to 'get rid' of their stock of SLR cameras at bargain prices.

Never has there been such an opportunity as this one right now, in which a quality 35mm film camera can be purchased for next to nothing. Whatever the make of camera, be Olympus, Cannon, Praktica, Nikon, Pentax, or Ricoh, if you keep your eyes open, you could grab yourself a bargain purchase.

If you are a lover of 35mm black and white film, and also a lover of film cameras, then this article is for you. You have a plethora of choices within the field of photography, as to what camera would suit you. Virtually every film camera now is ex-conditioned.

This means that, as mentioned above, they are being sold dirt-cheap. If it is your first foray into photography, then you can do no worse than buy yourself a mechanical single lens reflex camera to ease you in.

Of course, the downside that puts many people off purchasing a film camera [not just because of the new technology now] is the fact that mechanical film cameras do not work out shutter speeds and apertures.

You have to do this yourself, whereas digital cameras will do all of that for you. I feel that this makes photography 'lazy'. in allowing the camera to work out everything for you before you take the shot.

The true measure of a photographer, if you are an amateur, is working out you own shutter speeds and apertures. It is all about trial and error, and learning from your mistakes. Whether you overexpose, or underexpose, make sure that you mark down your exposure settings for future reference. The other thing that puts many people off using film cameras is the instant review. With digital cameras one can instantly see the results, without sending off for the print to be developed.

Obviously, this cannot be done with film cameras, and so you have to judge by trial and error. However, this is the best way of learning about the subject of photography, and about light conditions and what shutter speeds and apertures to use.

So to sum up, if you love film photography, then there has never been a better time in which you can purchase a fully mechanical SLR film camera. You will find many photographic stores, and those online too, that will be only too willing to do deals with you - in order to get rid of their remaining stock.

Look out for makes such as Cannon, Nikon, Ricoh, Pentax, Minolta, Vivitar, Cosina, Praktica and many more - as mentioned above. You will be sure to pick up a bargain or two among those cameras. Mechanical film cameras were built to last, they are rugged, [granted, they are heavy], but I like to know I am holding something of worth and substance, rather than just for 'looks'.

You can also purchase 35mm black and white film from many online photographic stores right now. If you become a regular customer and you purchase in bulk, they will be willing to do deals with you.

By also using filters in conjunction with black and white film, you will be doing your photography a great service. Use polarizing filters to cut out reflections from none-metallic surfaces, such as water.or glass.

These filters will also darken the sky, if it is blue, and will also break through haze and mist. Polarizing filters come with a high filter factor. The manufacturer of the filter will make sure they supply the correct factor with the filter. If your camera has TTLM [Through The Lens Metering] then you must use circular polarizing filters.

When shooting with black and white film one filter you must always have is a yellow filter. This is a filter which brings out the clouds and darkens the sky. Yellow filters also improves penetration of fog and mist.

Film photography is not dead, it has just been pushed to the wayside by the relentless wave of new technology, such as Digital High-Definition cameras. Those of us who continue to use 35mm black and white film, will always keep this genre alive, as long as we are alive.

Keeping Alive Black and White Film Photography - The Beauty of Heavy Metal Cameras

Mechanically-driven 35mm film cameras, many people believe, have now become obsolete. Due to the plethora of High-Definition Digital cameras on the market now, these new technologies have overtaken and superseded film photography.

But there are many lovers of the old technology, lovers of mechanical, heavy metal 35mm cameras that refuse to give up the ghost on this genre. This article concentrates on the bargains that can be had, if you wish to take up 35mm film photography - especially black and white.

Such is the control of digital cameras now, in the photographic market, that quality film cameras can be purchased for next to nothing. Never has there been a better time than now to take up your hobby using a film camera. By doing so, you will be keeping alive the wonderful craft that is film photography. And you will be joining a worldwide enthusiast group of people who still cling on to their old mechanical, heavy metal cameras with love and pride.

BetterPhoto Basics: The Absolute Beginner's Guide to Taking Photos Like a Pro
BetterPhoto Basics: The Absolute Beginner's Guide to Taking Photos Like a Pro

Although this book focuses on digital photography, it deals with a subject that - whether you use digital or a film camera - all cameras are subject too, and that is light.

This book teaches you how to use the potential of light in your photography to take better pictures time and again.

It shares tips, and tricks that the budding photographer can use in order to produce great prints time and again.

If you don't have time to read all of the book, then merely by flicking the pages you will land on a handy tip that will see you improve your photography.

The basics of photography is the same, whether you use a digital or mechanical camera.because all photography is based on light.

So, the handy tips you will gain from this book will help you no end in your photographic pursuits.

 
8 Types Of Natural Light That Will Add Drama To Your Photographs
8 Types Of Natural Light That Will Add Drama To Your Photographs

The meaning of photography is 'painting with light' All photography uses the main ingredient - and that is light.

This book shows you the eight types of light that can be used to enhance dramatically your photography.

From back-lighting, to diffused light and night time shots, the author will guide you through all of the processes you need to know in order to make your photography more creative than ever.

I am highlighting this book because, it also can be used in conjunction with those of us who use black and white film..

This is a great book in showing how light works, and just how you can use it to your own creative ends.

 

Film Photography: Prt 1

Keeping Alive B/W Film Photography

Black and White film photography is an art form. And, furthermore, it is beautiful. Do not let it die out

KEEP IT ALIVE

Keeping Alive Black and White Film Photography

This debate is about keeping alive the art of black and white photography.

Would you like to keep alive this genre of photography?

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Keeping Alive Black and White Film Photography

The manipulation of light, when shooting with black and white film, enhances any photograph beyond the 'norm'.

Painting with light is what any photographer should keep in mind, when shooting with black and white film.

The lack of color means that light, shadow and texture, become even more important within black and white photography.

Praktika Film Cameras

Praktica cameras. Rugged, strong and beautiful.

Keeping Alive Black and White Film Photography

The sheer beauty of black and white photography can be found within the simplest of photographs.

Keeping Alive Black and White Film Photography

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