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Personalized Stepping Stones For Gardens

Updated on February 26, 2013

Making Your Own Garden Walking Stones To Create Lasting Memories

Learn how to make your own stepping stones, an easy craft for kids and adults. This is the first of three tutorials on crafting garden stepping stones with easy to follow instructions, material lists and lots of photos. Each tutorial will teach a different method for making your own personalized stained glass stepping stones.

The first tutorial, "Stone Topper" is the easiest method. If you have never made a mosaic stepping stone or are looking for a fast and inexpensive way of crafting a number of stones quickly, then this is it!

No molds, no expensive kits, little mess and (the best part) you probably have most of the needed materials!

The second tutorial Garden Mosaic Stepping Stones follows the "glue 'n grout" method, teaching you a tiling application. Fun and a bit messy!

The third tutorial How To Make Inlaid Stepping Stones, gives you the steps for creating the most intricate stained glass mosaic designs. Easy yet beautiful finished garden stones.

Read on!

Personalized Stepping Stones for Gardens
Personalized Stepping Stones for Gardens

Handprint Stepping Stones

Using the Stone Topper Method

This is a wonderful beginning mosaic project. It's simplicity makes it easy to craft the stones quickly and it's a craft the whole family can join in on!

You begin with a commercial precast stepping stone, your choice of size, shape (square, round, or octangular), and color. Using "the handyman's secret weapon" commonly known as duct tape, a bag of ready-to-use cement mortar mix, a little water and some decorative stained glass cobbles you can make a beautiful stepping stone in a matter of an hour or two (depending on how long it takes you to create the perfect design).

Simple and lots of fun to make.

For our "how to" demonstration, I rounded up three teens with little or no crafting background. They each chose stained glass cobbles as their tesserae (the decorative items used to create the mosaic design) and they decided to embed their handprint for posterity. (Never know, one day they may become famous and that stone may be worth a small fortune!)

They had a blast! And their parents received a wonderful present.

Following are photos detailing the ease of making these stepping stones along with written instructions and a materials list! Have fun!

Making Mosaics is not only fun but it is a great family project!

Material List for the Stepping Stone Topper Project

1--12" Precast stepping stone, your choice of shape. (12" stepping stones can be purchased at home improvement stores for as low as $1.58 each)

Design Template--use either a 2nd precast stepping stone for setting up your mosaic design or you can set-up your design on paper cut or marked to the size and shape of your stone.

Marking pen or pencil

Stained Glass Cobbs (the big ones) or Cobbles (mid sized), the amount needed will depend on the design

5 lbs. of Quikrete Mortar Mix. This can be bought at most home improvement stores in 10#, 40#, 60# or 80# bags.

Duct tape, enough to wrap around the edge of the stone. The sturdier the better.

Up to 1 1/2 cup of Water for mixing with the mortar plus water for soaking the precast stone

1--plastic bucket or large plastic bowl

1--measuring cup for liquids

1-measuring cup for cement or a scale can be used

1-- garden trowel

Dust mask and Safety Glasses

Latex gloves

Safety Glasses (cement is very dusty and can cause eye irritation)

Petroleum Jelly-- If you plan on imprinting your hand into the mortar it is advised to use petroleum jelly to protect your skin from the caustic effect of cement. It dries your skin and can cause "sunburn like" irritations, this is especially important for small children.

Newspaper or a plastic tarp to protect your work surface

Paper towels and trash bag for clean-up

Photo How-to for Making Your Stone Topper Stepping Stone

Click thumbnail to view full-size
Step 3.  Soak the pre-made stepping stone in a water bath making sure both sides are thoroughly wet.  This will help prevent the stone from soaking the moisture out of the mortar too quickly, which could cause cracking.Step 4.  Once thoroughly soaked, wrap the stone with a good sturdy duct tape making a 1 1/2" to 2" bed to hold the wet mortar while forming a strong wall to keep the shape consistent with the shape of the stone.Step 1. Using a 2nd stone or a paper template pre-design your project using a marker to outline your hand imprint and any lettering you might want to include such as a date, artist initials, etc. Place your stained glass cobbles, seashells and/or anyStep 2.  Set up your work-space to include plenty of room to place your pre-laid design next to the precast stepping stone. After pouring your mortar slurry you will need to transfer your design pieces quickly before the mortar dries.Step 5. Using a trowel, thoroughly mix the dry mortar with the water until it is like peanut butter. If the mix is too dry add a small amount of water until it is of the desired consistency.  If is too runny add  dry mortar.Step 6. Scoop the mortar onto your stone using your trowel. Using the back of your trowel spread the wet mortar evenly across the base stone and as level as possible. With the edge of your trowel smooth the surface. The total time you spend on mixingStep 8. Using a pencil or thin stick, carve any letters/numbers into the mortar. Transfer your glass and other decorative items to the wet mortar gently pressing each piece into the wet cement.  Allow the mortar to dry (set-up) for about 15 to 20 minStep 7. Once your topper is smooth and even you can begin to decorate. Press your hand evenly into the wet mortar; you may have to use your other hand to help press down each finger to get a good imprint. Wash your hand of any residue before adding yStep 9.  Once the mortar has set, carefully remove the duct tape.  With a wet sponge wipe the edges to smooth out any rough areas.Step 10. Let dry 24 hours before moving it to a protected place where it can cure for a couple of weeks.
Step 3.  Soak the pre-made stepping stone in a water bath making sure both sides are thoroughly wet.  This will help prevent the stone from soaking the moisture out of the mortar too quickly, which could cause cracking.
Step 3. Soak the pre-made stepping stone in a water bath making sure both sides are thoroughly wet. This will help prevent the stone from soaking the moisture out of the mortar too quickly, which could cause cracking.
Step 4.  Once thoroughly soaked, wrap the stone with a good sturdy duct tape making a 1 1/2" to 2" bed to hold the wet mortar while forming a strong wall to keep the shape consistent with the shape of the stone.
Step 4. Once thoroughly soaked, wrap the stone with a good sturdy duct tape making a 1 1/2" to 2" bed to hold the wet mortar while forming a strong wall to keep the shape consistent with the shape of the stone.
Step 1. Using a 2nd stone or a paper template pre-design your project using a marker to outline your hand imprint and any lettering you might want to include such as a date, artist initials, etc. Place your stained glass cobbles, seashells and/or any
Step 1. Using a 2nd stone or a paper template pre-design your project using a marker to outline your hand imprint and any lettering you might want to include such as a date, artist initials, etc. Place your stained glass cobbles, seashells and/or any
Step 2.  Set up your work-space to include plenty of room to place your pre-laid design next to the precast stepping stone. After pouring your mortar slurry you will need to transfer your design pieces quickly before the mortar dries.
Step 2. Set up your work-space to include plenty of room to place your pre-laid design next to the precast stepping stone. After pouring your mortar slurry you will need to transfer your design pieces quickly before the mortar dries.
Step 5. Using a trowel, thoroughly mix the dry mortar with the water until it is like peanut butter. If the mix is too dry add a small amount of water until it is of the desired consistency.  If is too runny add  dry mortar.
Step 5. Using a trowel, thoroughly mix the dry mortar with the water until it is like peanut butter. If the mix is too dry add a small amount of water until it is of the desired consistency. If is too runny add dry mortar.
Step 6. Scoop the mortar onto your stone using your trowel. Using the back of your trowel spread the wet mortar evenly across the base stone and as level as possible. With the edge of your trowel smooth the surface. The total time you spend on mixing
Step 6. Scoop the mortar onto your stone using your trowel. Using the back of your trowel spread the wet mortar evenly across the base stone and as level as possible. With the edge of your trowel smooth the surface. The total time you spend on mixing
Step 8. Using a pencil or thin stick, carve any letters/numbers into the mortar. Transfer your glass and other decorative items to the wet mortar gently pressing each piece into the wet cement.  Allow the mortar to dry (set-up) for about 15 to 20 min
Step 8. Using a pencil or thin stick, carve any letters/numbers into the mortar. Transfer your glass and other decorative items to the wet mortar gently pressing each piece into the wet cement. Allow the mortar to dry (set-up) for about 15 to 20 min
Step 7. Once your topper is smooth and even you can begin to decorate. Press your hand evenly into the wet mortar; you may have to use your other hand to help press down each finger to get a good imprint. Wash your hand of any residue before adding y
Step 7. Once your topper is smooth and even you can begin to decorate. Press your hand evenly into the wet mortar; you may have to use your other hand to help press down each finger to get a good imprint. Wash your hand of any residue before adding y
Step 9.  Once the mortar has set, carefully remove the duct tape.  With a wet sponge wipe the edges to smooth out any rough areas.
Step 9. Once the mortar has set, carefully remove the duct tape. With a wet sponge wipe the edges to smooth out any rough areas.
Step 10. Let dry 24 hours before moving it to a protected place where it can cure for a couple of weeks.
Step 10. Let dry 24 hours before moving it to a protected place where it can cure for a couple of weeks.

Mosaic Stepping Stones... Make Wonderful Presents!

Complete Stone Topper Written Directions

An Easy Step-By-Step Guide

Step 1. Create Your Design.

Make a paper template of your stepping stone or use a 2nd stone for your design layout. Outline your hand placement using a marker and any lettering you might want to include such as a date, artist initials, etc. Place your stained glass cobbles, seashells and/or any other items you might want to include to finish your design.

Step 2. Set Up Your Work-Space.

Pick a place where there is good ventilation and is suitable for working with cement. Outside on a nice day or in your garage should be ideal. Set up a work table covered with newspapers or a plastic tarp. Place both your stepping stone and your pre-laid design near each other. When ready you will need to transfer your pieces quickly before the mortar dries.

Step 3. Soak Your Stone.

Soak the pre-made stepping stone in a water bath making sure both sides are thoroughly wet. This will help prevent the stone from soaking the moisture out of the mortar too quickly, which could cause cracking.

Step 4. Wrap With Duct Tape.

Once thoroughly soaked, wrap the stone with a good sturdy duct tape forming a 1 1/2" tall bed which will hold the wet mortar. Make sure the duct tape sticks securely. You may want to wrap your stone twice for added strength.

Step 5. Mixing Your Mortar.

Put on your" dusk mask and safety glasses. Measure out 5 cups or 5 pounds of dry" mortar into a large bucket. Add 3/4 cup of water, saving the rest for adding as needed. Using a trowel, thoroughly mix the dry mortar with the water until it is like thick peanut butter. If the mix is too dry add a small amount of water until it is of the desired consistency. If is too runny add dry mortar. Make sure the slurry is thoroughly mixed before pouring. See mixing tips for additional instructions.

Step 6. Make it Smooth.

Scoop the mortar onto your stone using your trowel. Using the back of your trowel spread the wet mortar evenly across the base stone and as level as possible. With the edge of your trowel smooth the surface. The total time you spend on mixing, pouring and smoothing should be no more than 5 minutes.

Step 7. Decorate!

Once your topper is smooth you can begin to decorate. Paying attention to your design, press your hand evenly into the wet mortar; you may have to use your other hand to help press down each finger to get a good imprint. Using a pencil or thin stick engrave your stone with your initials, date, etc. Wash your hand of any residue before adding your stained glass cobbles. Let set.

Step 8. Final Steps.

When the mortar slurry firms (in approximately 15 to 30 minutes) gently remove the duct tape. With a wet sponge gently round out the edges and smooth any rough spots. The newly poured stone now needs to cure for a couple of weeks before it can be put outside. Your stone is weakest on the day it is poured so let it sit at least 24 hours before moving it to a place where it can finish curing.

Step 9. Clean Up.

Be sure to clean off the trowel and plastic tubs as soon as you're finished with them. Any excess mortar discard in a trash bag. Tools can be easily cleaned outdoors using a garden hose or wash them in a bucket of water. Once the cement hardens it will be difficult to remove. Don't clean them in your house sinks....cement can clog up your drain lines!

More Stepping Stone Tutorials

Tutorial #2 Garden Mosaic Stepping Stones teaches the crafting of a stepping stone using the "Glue and Grout" method. A fun and a bit messy way of applying your mosaic design.

Tutorial #3 How To Make Stepping Stones gives complete instruction for the "Inlaid Method". The best and easiest method to achieve that "professional" look.

How About.....

...making Stepping Stones as a great fund raising project for schools & groups!

Design Ideas For Your Stepping Stone

Designing stepping stones is fun and very personal. It doesn't have to be a work of art, it has to be about you, your favorite colors, your favorite shapes, your favorite theme.

Do you want to make it for a gift? If it's for a parent a hand or foot imprint always will be cherished. Add color with stained glass cobbles, marbles, old legos, and maybe a penny with your birth year. Find small items that would be memorable of your growing up. Even photos can be embedded.

If it is for a friend think of what they would like. What are their favorite colors? Would they prefer an abstract design? Or maybe a design with a garden theme like flowers or bugs!

For a first stone I always suggest to pull out all the stuff that you might have that could be used to decorate a stepping stone. Old keys, coins, seashells, marbles, beach glass, stained glass cobbles, broken decorative china pieces, polished rocks, buttons, small toys, jewelry pendants, charms, mementos of any sort that can withstand being outdoors and possibly walked on.

Next, lay it out on a table and begin to arrange it into pleasing designs. You may want to line it all up and then push and pull that straight line into a curvey line or maybe a circle or heart. Once you start to visualize the design possibilities with the items you have, transfer them to a paper template cut to the size and shape of the stepping stone you want to make and continue to create. Imagine how it will look in your yard with the sunlight hitting it.

The Best Glass for Stepping Stones

I love Stained Glass Cobbles! They are made right here in the United States. They are made from 98% post-consumer recycled glass bottles and plate glass. And best of all....they are beautiful and safe to handle. No breaking, cutting or bleeding! Easy and wonderful! And available at Amazon. Check them out!

Which Cement To Use In Stepping Stones

There are several manufacturers of cement products. One of the largest and well known is Qwikrete. Their products can be found at most home improvement stores such as Lowes and Home Depot. For the "Stone Topper" method I use and highly recommend "Qwikrete Mortar Mix". Their mortar mix is a blend of masonry cement and graded sand. It is a long lasting, strong bonding mortar that can withstand outdoor weather conditions. When it dries it has a pale grey color or you can add colorants to make the dried stone more colorful. (see "Color Options")

I like the option of purchasing the Qwikrete Mortar Mix in 10# bags. It is easily transportable and it only costs $1.98. That's a buck per topping!

Mixing Cement and Other Tips

For Best Results Read This Before Starting Your Project

1. Prepare.

Have your working area set-up, all of your materials ready to use, and make sure your dusk mask, gloves and safety glasses are available when needed. Cement sets-up quickly and you have to be ready.

2. Measure.

Water and Cement (Mortar) VERY IMPORTANT TO READ!!!!

The right amount of water added to any cement mix is very important. Using too much water will weaken or cause cracking in your stone. Too little water will cause the stone to dry too fast which will also weaken the stone. The trick is to start out with approximately 2/3 of the total water

that you think you will need. Then slowly add more water, a few drops at a time, until the mix is the consistency of peanut butter or a thick milk shake. It is best is you use water at room temperature. Warmer water will cause the cement to set up faster giving you less time to apply your decorations.

The amount of water needed will vary with each stone made due to humidity, the color of cement used and the way in which you mix your cement. Less water is required in humid weather, when using lighter colors of cement, or when you use a power tool to mix your slurry.

3. Rule of Thumb

The rule of thumb on calculating a water to cement ratio is 2 oz. of water to every cup of cement mix. Make sure you read #2.

4. Mixing Cement

MIX VIGOROUSLY! No wimpy mixing allowed! And wear your safety equipment!

The strength of the final piece relies on vigorous mixing. You want to make sure that all of the cement is thorougly mixed with the water, no dry spots. Hand mixing is fine for small batches but larger batches should be mixed with a power mixer such as a drill with a mixing blade attachment.

Note that as you mix "vigorously" the cement slurry will thin so use caution when adding additional water.

5. Air Bubbles

Air bubbles in the slurry will rise while the stone is drying to cause little air holes in the surface of the finished piece. To eleviate many of these you need to "burp" your stone. Once poured and smoothed, gently tap the lower precast base stone with a rubber mallet , slowly moving the mallet around the base. Thirty seconds will probably do the trick.

After the stone is set you can fill any holes left by making up a small batch of slurry paste using a teaspoon or so of mortar mix and a few drops of water. Using a gloved finger rub the slurry into the hole wiping any excess off with a damp sponge.

6. Drying Tips

For the first 24 hours after making your stone let it sit undisturbed. This is when it is the weakest. The precast stone is going to be drawing moisture from the newly poured top so cover it with plastic, a household trash bag or grocery bag will due. The following day you can move it indoors where it will need to fully cure for a couple more weeks before it can go outside.

Material Safety Data Sheet for Qwikcrete Products (MSDS)

Qwikcrete has posted on their website their Material Safety Data Sheet for you to view. Go to http://www.quikrete.com/PDFs/MSDS-E1-MasonryMortar...

Every great company stands behind their customers and their products. It seems to me that American made products such as Qwikcrete do more for the safety of their customers then those products made overseas.

Support Americans.....Buy American!

Color Options for Stepping Stones

The wonderful thing about technology is that you don't have to stick to plain grey cement. There are a range of beautiful color additives available in liquid and powder forms. Add colors with concrete powders sprinkled or rubbed into the surface of the concrete when wet or mix the color directly into the cement slurry. You can also achieve wonderful effects using acid stain and different colored paints on dry or even old cement. Get an idea of what is available by following the Amazon connection below.

What Concrete Colorants are Available?

Share Your Ideas, Projects, and Comments

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    • GardenIdeasHub LM profile image

      GardenIdeasHub LM 4 years ago

      I really enjoyed your lens about personalized stepping stones for garden. Thanks for the step by step guide.

    • profile image

      john9229 4 years ago

      Great idea! Nice stones for garden.

    • profile image

      NoseHairTrimmer 4 years ago

      I enjoy reading your lens! Squidlike

    • CrossCreations profile image

      Carolan Ross 4 years ago from St. Louis, MO

      Oh what fun to create mosaid stepping stones! Once a friend and I did this and we bought some funky old china plates at a thrift shop, then smashed them to pieces and used the pieces as tesserae. Fun!

    • dawnsnewbeginning profile image

      dawnsnewbeginning 4 years ago

      I like these!

    • profile image

      dream1983 5 years ago

      Fantastic lens, thank you for sharing!

    • eccles1 profile image

      eccles1 5 years ago

      another cute mosaic lens this time even kids can do

    • blue22d profile image

      blue22d 5 years ago

      Some great ideas to personalize your own stepping stone. There is a spot in our front lawn that needs this help...Thanks!

    • profile image

      julieannbrady 5 years ago

      This is such a fabulous idea for personalizing a garden or walkway. Love your creativity.

    • bbsoulful2 profile image

      bbsoulful2 5 years ago

      Just what I'm looking for! My mom makes stepping stones for her garden in Florida, and your article is just the encouragement that I need. Thanks for the detailed explanations!

    • rentinlondon lm profile image

      rentinlondon lm 5 years ago

      This is going to be my summer project - one made by each of the kids!

    • profile image

      gravityx9 5 years ago

      awesome lens! Shared @ Pinterest!

    • profile image

      imagineallart 5 years ago

      Great ideas! I will try it myself.

    • bikerministry profile image

      bikerministry 5 years ago

      What a great lens and super garden idea. Blessings.

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      Returning with some fresh angel dust to add to the mix for your personalized stepping stones!

    • evitaa profile image

      evitaa 6 years ago

      Excellent lens. Thumbs up!

    • JackieBlock profile image

      Jackie Block 6 years ago from SE Michigan

      Thanks for sharing these detailed instructions. My daughter and I are going to make some stepping stones to give to her grandparents. Your instructions are wonderful. Thank you.

    • profile image

      dellgirl 6 years ago

      Love love love this lens, these stones are beautiful! I'm lensrolling this to my MS word doc. for future reference. These (or some like them) will certainly be pretty in my brand new garden.

    • Wedding Mom profile image

      Wedding Mom 6 years ago

      This is indeed a beautiful way of improving your garden. I would love to get my hands on making mosaic and this lens will be a great help for me to achieve this goal. This is a very remarkable lens, I really appreciate that you took the time to share it. Lovely work!

    • profile image

      anonymous 6 years ago

      sooo cool! this lens is awesome.

      _____________________________________

      get the perfect DIY conservatory to improve the look and feel of your home!

    • hsschulte profile image

      hsschulte 6 years ago

      Beautiful lens. Blessed.

    • MargoPArrowsmith profile image

      MargoPArrowsmith 6 years ago

      I have done things like this. Lots of fun

    • ikeephouse profile image

      ikeephouse 6 years ago

      Your pictures are great.

    • LouisaDembul profile image

      LouisaDembul 6 years ago

      What a nice idea!

    • Lee Hansen profile image

      Lee Hansen 6 years ago from Vermont

      Love your ideas and tutorials. Lensrolling to my Garden Crafts lenses.

    • VarietyWriter2 profile image

      VarietyWriter2 6 years ago

      Blessed by a SquidAngel :)

    • jackieb99 profile image

      jackieb99 6 years ago

      Very interesting idea!

    • profile image

      anonymous 6 years ago

      Well written lens...You make working with cement seem easy

    • deyanis profile image

      deyanis 6 years ago from Oz

      A very thorough & comprehensive tutorials about mosaic stepping stones. It's a labor of love and will definitely makes a great gift. --- Blessed ---

    • noobeegin profile image

      noobeegin 6 years ago

      Nice lens. My mother has handprint stones for every one of her grandchildren all around her yard. She just loves them. They are all unique as each grandchild decorated their own.

    • CrossCreations profile image

      Carolan Ross 6 years ago from St. Louis, MO

      LOVE this project and plan to make some of these in the springtime. This tutorial is SO well-done, very comprehensive. FAVED!

    • MargoPArrowsmith profile image

      MargoPArrowsmith 7 years ago

      I did this years ago, with sea glass and some other found things. It was fun.

    • Diana888 profile image

      Diana J. Limjoco 7 years ago from Puerto Princesa, Palawan

      You have the best ideas and suggestiong..thanks so much for sharing!

    • profile image

      sue423 7 years ago

      Wow - another great tutorial! Thanks so much for making these lenses.

    • profile image

      TWOnline2 7 years ago

      cool

    • sorana lm profile image

      sorana lm 7 years ago

      Love the idea with the keys. Another great lens. I'll definitely come back to your lenses.

    • profile image

      GabrielaFargasch 7 years ago

      They are so gorgeous! I love colorful stuff!!!

    • profile image

      anonymous 7 years ago

      I'd say you have another great tutorial on your hands! I love your step by step instructions and tips on how to personalize stepping stones for that special someone. Better yet, you problem solve by sharing the "burping" process. Sweet!

    • WildFacesGallery profile image

      Mona 7 years ago from Iowa

      Another beautifully done artsy fartsy how-to. Really nice. I've joined your fan club. :)

    • Franksterk profile image

      Frankie Kangas 7 years ago from California

      Beautifully done with easy step-by-step instructions that make it look so easy. I'll have to try it! I've lensrolled the lens to my How to Make a Topiary and How to Make a Terrarium. Bear hugs, Frankster

    • Mickie Gee profile image

      Mickie Goad 7 years ago

      I made a mosaic pot at a workshop a few months ago. Loved it.

      I must make these with my grandchildren. It will make a wonderful holiday gift!

    • HorseAndPony LM profile image

      HorseAndPony LM 7 years ago

      Great ideas. I think we will make a few stepping stones. Thanks for all the tips!

    • Sylvestermouse profile image

      Cynthia Sylvestermouse 7 years ago from United States

      This is a fabulous tutorial and a most excellent idea!

    • spunkyduckling profile image

      spunkyduckling 7 years ago

      Beautiful! Thanks for sharing the easy to make mosaic stepping stone. Somehow I just like mosaics only outdoor. Suits it there. Wink. Wink.

    • KimGiancaterino profile image

      KimGiancaterino 7 years ago

      I'm so excited to try this! I need to get to work on my mosaic pieces.

    • norma-holt profile image

      norma-holt 7 years ago

      Very nice lens. *-*Blessed*-* and featured on Sprinkled with Stardust and also on Lenosgraphy on How-To Lenses

    • ButterflyBeauty2 profile image

      ButterflyBeauty2 7 years ago

      Great Lens. i tried making a stepping stone a long time ago, and it crumbled. This seems like a great way to get it right. I'm going to try Quickrete

    • khael profile image

      khael 7 years ago

      Neat! More visual inspiration for virtually unrelated art stuff. Nice Lens.

    • indigoj profile image

      Indigo Janson 7 years ago from UK

      What a nice idea for one-of-a-kind stepping stones for your garden!

    • profile image

      resabi 7 years ago

      I like this lens. The instructions are clear. The pictures are excellent and really bring the steps alive. I'm not at all handy but I feel tempted to try this project! Great job. Blessed (featured on my Winging It lens)..

    • BuckHawkcenter profile image

      BuckHawkcenter 7 years ago

      Very nice job on your first lens! And welcome to Squidoo!

    • delia-delia profile image

      Delia 7 years ago

      Thanks for sharing! love it!