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Leslie Sinclair Oil Paintings - Stroked Bamboo Series 2006

Updated on January 5, 2014

Seventh Painting in the Series - a Detail on a Board

I produced the series of paintings show here after being diagnosed with a small stroke which sapped my endurance and challenged memory, speech and thought process. Although the effects of the event mimicked those of stroke the diagnosis was later revised to complex migraine.

For a couple of years prior to the event I had concentrated on working with clay doing handbuilding, and on mixed media drawings. After the event, sitting at my drawing table for long periods of time while using the pens in tight concentration was a struggle that was beyond me.

© 2006 Leslie Sinclair - NO USE PERMITTED - All Rights Reserved

I decided to switch back to painting in oils as a means of incorporating all my therapies during that period. It had previously been easy for me to get lost in the act of painting and to spend hours at a stretch on my feet, doing what's termed active standing.

That's where a painter, for example, stands at the easel applying paint, and then walks back maybe twenty feet or more to evaluate the progress of the painting, returning back to the easel space. Even while standing I am never still for more than a few moments, moving from one foot to another, occasionally sitting on a stool.

Working on a 2'w X 4'h surface, as on many of the pieces in this series, I might plant both feet to do a few strokes, then step one foot closer to the palette lying on my workbench to mix some paint, and then return to the two-foot stance - only to move both feet to pick up a rag off the floor, and then move to wipe off some paint.

As time passed I created my own bamboo forest, enjoying the healing effects. For two years bamboo stalks and leaves were the prime focus of my oil paintings, gradually to be replaced by images from our contemporary manmade environment.

ALL Paintings é Leslie Sinclair - NO USE PERMITTED - All Rights Reserved

My artwork reflects my life, as I connect with local, relational and global issues. As a child I overheard some adults gossiping about someone who wasn't present, and I shuddered. How, I wondered, would they feel if that person they were critiquing was in some other social setting bad-mouthing them?

That event, more than anything, fostered my sensitivity towards those who live on the outside of the favored class, whether family-wise, community-wise, intellect, appearance, or power-wise, and their rights to respect. The same attitude informs my work that focuses on injustices that are ingrained in the attitudes of many - towards the disenfranchised.

SQUIDOO WRITERS - earn points with QUIZZES at bottom.

Leslie Sinclair's Early Foray Into Nature Scenes

© 1985 Leslie Sinclair - NO USE PERMITTED

All Rights Reserved

In the 1980s I began drawing by taking a class at our local Parks Department. From the moment I first put pencil to paper, in an exercise in mark making, I was hooked. It felt like I was born to draw. I concentrated on drawing in our rural landscape, showed and sold my work, prior to a return to college, and obtaining a M.F.A. in Painting and Drawing.

My areas of focus are oil and acrylic painting, mixed-media drawing, collage, handbuilt clay panels, and media that capture my interest.

Full Shape of Painting Above

Full Shape of Painting Above
Full Shape of Painting Above

Why Bamboo?

For me to select content from nature was an anomaly

with purpose

I sought to regain some of the resilience

I felt I'd lost

and bamboo

seemed like the perfect metaphor

Until gradually my content again

became more complicated

Second Painting in the Series

© 2005 Leslie Sinclair - NO USE PERMITTED

All Rights Reserved

I Used These Brushes With My Oil Thinned Oil Paints

Winsor & Newton University Series 235 Round Long Handle Brush, Size 10
Winsor & Newton University Series 235 Round Long Handle Brush, Size 10

I typically break the rules: I usually thin my oils with stand oil until they are liquid, and then store them in tiny bottles or plastic tubs.

I use large rounds and sling the paint onto the surface.

Since the brushes are not pricey I don't worry that they're made for acrylics or watercolors, not oils. I use them anyway.

 

#3 Was Stolen

If you see this painting, please leave information in comment section below.

Fourth & Third Paintings in the Series - 4th on left, 3rd on right

© 2005 Leslie Sinclair - NO USE PERMITTED

All Rights Reserved

Fifth and Sixth Paintings in the Series - 5th on left, 6th on right

© 2006 Leslie Sinclair - NO USE PERMITTED

All Rights Reserved

Eighth and Ninth Paintings in the Series - 8th on left, 9th on right

© 2006 Leslie Sinclair - NO USE PERMITTED

All Rights Reserved

Eleventh Painting in the Series

© 2006 Leslie Sinclair - NO USE PERMITTED

All Rights Reserved

Twelfth Painting in the Series

© 2006 Leslie Sinclair - NO USE PERMITTED

All Rights Reserved

Thirteenth & Seventeenth Paintings in the Series - 13th on left, 17th on right

© 2006 Leslie Sinclair - NO USE PERMITTED

All Rights Reserved

Fourteenth Painting in the Series

© 2006 Leslie Sinclair - NO USE PERMITTED

All Rights Reserved

Nineteenth and Twentieth Paintings - The Last - 19th on left, 20th on right

© 2006 Leslie Sinclair - NO USE PERMITTED

All Rights Reserved

The 20th, a mixed-media painting, is painted on a wide stalk of bamboo placed in a weighted wooden box.

In a local thrift store I found a discarded and soiled Native American celebration dance shirt. It had been white satin, the heavy old style, but it was mostly dingy dark grey, stained by the hanging metal pieces. I bought it.

I discovered that the metal things were chewing tobacco tin lids, rolled into cones, and attached by satin strips, so they dangled all over the shirt. To me they were a find! After much work I attached them to the bamboo before and after painting.

I Prefer Sharper Colors

...but still, this is my current fall-back color

a deep cadmium yellow

by

Senelier

Paint With My Favorite Oil Paints

Sennelier Artists' Oil Color - Cadmium Yellow Deep - 40ml Tube
Sennelier Artists' Oil Color - Cadmium Yellow Deep - 40ml Tube

Since I first opened a tube of this fine paint I was hooked. It remains my favorite color, and sometimes I just put it away in a drawer for a while so I don't just use it as a crut

ch.

 
Daniel Smith Original Oil Color 37ml Paint Tube, Titanium White
Daniel Smith Original Oil Color 37ml Paint Tube, Titanium White

I depend almost exclusively on titanium white.

 
Daniel Smith Original Oil Color 37ml Paint Tube, Chromium Green Oxide
Daniel Smith Original Oil Color 37ml Paint Tube, Chromium Green Oxide

Although I sometimes use viridian, or soft warm greens, I usually opt for an acid tone.

 
Daniel Smith Original Oil Color 37ml Paint Tube, Permanent Orange
Daniel Smith Original Oil Color 37ml Paint Tube, Permanent Orange

My favorite orange is permanent, and I often lighten it and tone it down.

 
Daniel Smith Original Oil Color 37ml Paint Tube, Cobalt Violet Deep
Daniel Smith Original Oil Color 37ml Paint Tube, Cobalt Violet Deep

I like the richness of cobalt violet. Even when lightened it packs a whallop.

 

I Work in Series

My largest series in clay is called Pickflowers

Images from my Chemo Journal Drawings

are interpreted in abstraction

on small clay hand carved and glazed panels

First Stroked Bamboo Painting

© 2005 Leslie Sinclair - NO USE PERMITTED

All Rights Reserved

I started small for my entry into the stroked painting series. It was a matter of testing out my energy level, and I did so by constructing several very small surfaces in the same manner.

This initial painting is done on paper glued onto canvas with rabbit skin glue. I gessoed the top and bottom strips of canvas that extend beyond the heavy paper. Then I wrapped the canvas ends around wood dowels, and stitched down through the paper laminated with the canvas with silver wires.

Paper has long been my favorite painting surface. Most of these pieces are painted on gessoed wood veneer, my second favorite foundation. The mixed-media pieces are created on paper, with found objects, objects I made, and paint.

It is now 2013 and I'm working primarily in acrylics on hard surfaces and on canvas, and mixed-media drawings.

All Paintings © Leslie Sinclair - NO USE PERMITTED

All Rights Reserved

See Leslie Sinclair Artwork at Serenity Gallery

Serenity Gallery 13343 N.E. 20th St., Suite E & D, Bellevue, WA 98805. 425.727.7785

You'll Find Some References to Me Online

I'm the Leslie Sinclair, artist, who makes art in Seattle, and write on Squidoo.

I'm Interested to Read Your Comments on My Lens

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    • lesliesinclair profile image
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      lesliesinclair 4 years ago

      @Dusty2 LM: I appreciate that you are able to discern more than is blatantly obvious in the painting series. Thanks for sharing your take on the work.

    • Dusty2 LM profile image

      Dusty2 LM 4 years ago

      Very nice lens that is beautifully done. Really enjoyed seeing all the paintings in this series. It's amazing how you took one subject, the bamboo, and by changing a few colors see it entirely different. The beauty is spectacular but if you look closely there is just that one core element in each of them. That is definitely talent and you have it Papier. Thank You for visiting my Best Host and Hostess Thank You Gifts lens and giving it a "thumbs up" as I really appreciate it and you sharing this lens. Have an A1Day!

    • lesliesinclair profile image
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      lesliesinclair 4 years ago

      @shewins: Such a lovely thought. Maybe I'll consider it. Thanks.

    • shewins profile image

      shewins 4 years ago

      So beautiful. I couldn't help thinking what lovely fabrics they'd make.

    • lesliesinclair profile image
      Author

      lesliesinclair 4 years ago

      @Diana Wenzel: I've also wondered how it would feel to try my hand at painting bamboo in an Oriental style. I may try it.

    • Diana Wenzel profile image

      Renaissance Woman 4 years ago from Colorado

      Exquisite series. Love, love, love bamboo. Perfect metaphor. I painted bamboo extensively when I was studying Sumi-e painting. Bamboo has such essence. A person could spend a lifetime painting bamboo. So much nuance to unleash. I feel I have yet to do justice to that essence. Wishing you all the very best that bamboo represents: strength, resilience, renewability, flexibility, and much more.

    • lesliesinclair profile image
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      lesliesinclair 4 years ago

      @anonymous: It's my pleasure. I had delayed doing so for years.

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      This is such beautiful art. Thank you for sharing this on Squidoo.

    • lesliesinclair profile image
      Author

      lesliesinclair 4 years ago

      @Carol Houle: Thanks, CarolHoule, I'm still drawn to bamboo - would love to have a stand of bamboo at the approach to the front door, once I get a front door!

    • Carol Houle profile image

      Carol Houle 4 years ago from Montreal

      Very intriguing, paintings and motif.

    • lesliesinclair profile image
      Author

      lesliesinclair 4 years ago

      @bluelily lm: Yes, don't you find bamboo to be a carrier of much of the message of life?

    • profile image

      myspace9 4 years ago

      Amazing all paintings are wonderful.

    • lesliesinclair profile image
      Author

      lesliesinclair 4 years ago

      @myspace9: Sometimes what we see is a reflection of ourselves.

    • lesliesinclair profile image
      Author

      lesliesinclair 4 years ago

      @RinchenChodron: One of my delights in teaching university students was to reach those with zero experience in visual expression. My life did not become art-driven until my fourth decade. Give yourself permission by picking up a tablet and a soft drawing pencil or a little kit of paints. You may surprise yourself.

    • bluelily lm profile image

      bluelily lm 4 years ago

      These oil painting theme which has been weaved on the bamboo as base. It captivates a person attention and thoughts starts exploring the inner meaning of the color splashes seen in the painting.

      Nice paintings!

    • profile image

      RinchenChodron 4 years ago

      I wish I was talented like you! Have always appreciated art, but am very insecure to try it.

    • lesliesinclair profile image
      Author

      lesliesinclair 4 years ago

      @HughSmulders LM: They are definitely not painted in the traditional Asian manner.

    • katiecolette profile image

      katiecolette 4 years ago

      @lesliesinclair: Well said.

    • HughSmulders LM profile image

      HughSmulders LM 4 years ago

      I like her works. I guess that they can be suitable for various interior designs.

    • lesliesinclair profile image
      Author

      lesliesinclair 4 years ago

      @Rosetta Slone: Me too, although at the time I painted these I had never lived among bamboo, but still identified with it.

    • lesliesinclair profile image
      Author

      lesliesinclair 4 years ago

      @anonymous: Alma, don't you sometimes think that some thoughts are not of your own making, but have been deposited in your mind, or merely travel through the fingers to be typed before you really know what they are? I do. In fact, that is normally the way with my artwork.

    • lesliesinclair profile image
      Author

      lesliesinclair 4 years ago

      @burntchestnut: I guess the vibrancy of the colors was just part of the recovery process because most of my preceding work used more muted colors.

    • lesliesinclair profile image
      Author

      lesliesinclair 4 years ago

      @rebecca-mathews1: I appreciate your perspective. This was one of the more difficult writing challenges I've faced on Squidoo.

    • lesliesinclair profile image
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      lesliesinclair 4 years ago

      @DebW07: That was a surprise, DebW07, and a pleasure. Glad you like the work.

    • lesliesinclair profile image
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      lesliesinclair 4 years ago

      @SBPI Inc: Well, I wouldn't recommend having the catalyst I used for this work, but then that's hardly a choice. Since I haven't used oils now for a couple of years I'd forgotten how luscious the paint surfaces are.

    • lesliesinclair profile image
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      lesliesinclair 4 years ago

      @BLouw: Sometimes I think of doing paintings of flowers because I wonder how I would represent them.

    • lesliesinclair profile image
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      lesliesinclair 4 years ago

      @Rosanna Grace: I'm so glad, because I find bamboo to be an amazing grass and can envision walking a short spell in a stand of young bamboo.

    • lesliesinclair profile image
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      lesliesinclair 4 years ago

      @anonymous: Your comment is welcome and reciprocated.

    • lesliesinclair profile image
      Author

      lesliesinclair 4 years ago

      @sybil watson: I appreciate your sentiments. I'm not sure those who know my other artwork would ever have identified these paintings as mine, but it was a time period that called for less intellectual work.

    • lesliesinclair profile image
      Author

      lesliesinclair 4 years ago

      @Rhonda Lytle: Thank you - I'm only using what God provided.

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      The disenfranchised have a champion in you as you eloquently create beauty with words as well as a brush. You would be one of the rare among us that has no guile but only a rich depth of soul.

    • profile image

      burntchestnut 4 years ago

      Vibrant colors and interesting designs. I like how you've done a series.

    • rebecca-mathews1 profile image

      rebecca-mathews1 4 years ago

      Your paints are really interesting, thought provoking. Congrats on your imminent challenge win as well.

    • profile image

      DebW07 4 years ago

      Excellent work and beautiful paintings! Congrats on winning this week's Imminent challenge. Way to go Papier!

    • SBPI Inc profile image

      SBPI Inc 4 years ago

      Amazing work. Creativity displayed in many ways and all with your lens and art.

      Thank you for explaining haw it is done and for sharing your creations.

    • BLouw profile image

      Barbara Walton 4 years ago from France

      A very interesting collection of paintings. I like the way that you work in series and that you've used Squidoo to publicize your work. I'm an artist too and still waiting to get a chance to photograph my work to put it on line.

    • Rosanna Grace profile image

      Rosanna Grace 4 years ago

      Beautiful! I enjoyed viewing your works of art. Bamboo is a wonderful subject.

    • Rosanna Grace profile image

      Rosanna Grace 4 years ago

      Beautiful! I enjoyed viewing your works of art. Bamboo is a wonderful subject.

    • Rosanna Grace profile image

      Rosanna Grace 4 years ago

      Beautiful! I enjoyed viewing your works of art. Bamboo is a wonderful subject.

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      Leslie we love you and your paintings

    • Rosetta Slone profile image

      Rosetta Slone 4 years ago from Under a coconut tree

      I love everything that bamboo represents - you've really showcased the mix of strength and flexibility well. Those paintings are seriously incredible.

    • profile image

      sybil watson 4 years ago

      You're an incredible artist - thank you for sharing your beautiful paintings with us.

    • Rhonda Lytle profile image

      Rhonda Lytle 4 years ago from Deep in the heart of Dixie

      Serious talent displayed here!