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The Candle: Wooden Wicks

Updated on June 30, 2013

The Candle: Wooden Wicks

The Candle: Wooden Wicks

There's been quite a bit of buzz lately about wooden wicks and I'd like to explore what they really are.

Literally, this wick is made from a piece of wood, and they are fairly new to the candle making community.

Wooden wicks tend to come in two varieties: hard wood wick and soft wood wicks. While hard wood wicks are available, soft wood wicks offer a superior product. When they are burned, soft wooden wicks produce a unique crackle and popping sound, like that of a log fire in the fireplace.

The soft wooden wicks are created from 2 pieces of wood. The flame is made from the wide, soft piece of wood. The heat is produced from the narrow piece of hard wood, called the booster. The wood pieces are treated with a solution that increases the crackling when burning, and allows the wood to light easily and remain burning. When the candle is finished, the wooden wick should extend about and eighth of an inch above the wax line.

Wooden wicks are not for use in votive candles or pillar candles. They are an excellent choice for container candles and work well with soy wax. They are also recommended for gel wax, vegetable wax and most types of paraffin wax. If the candle is being made from pure soy, a large or extra large wooden wick is recommended. Since soy wax tends to hold in the heat and scent, the melt pool needs to be big enough to melt the candle.

Achieving a good crackle sound, is based on the right amount of candle scent, the type of wax being used and the amount of dye that is included. There are differing opinions about whether the candle scent helps or hinders the crackling sound, so this is something you will have to discover based on trial and error.

The wooden wicks need to be placed in the tabs that come with the wick and assembled before they are placed in the liquid wax. After the candle has been poured, it should be allowed to set overnight to cure the wick. When the candle has been cured and ready to light, light the wick from the wax line, not the top of the wick.

Wooden wicks come in many different sizes. The size you will need is based on which type of wax you are using, color & scent, and the diameter of the container. Help is available from any of the candle supply companies who supply wooden wicks.

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Sue Lichtenberg is the leading expert on candle making at The Cranberry Barn. She has been creating candles since she was a young girl.

She is the founder of The Cranberry Barn.

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    • TheCandle LM profile image
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      TheCandle LM 5 years ago

      @JJNW: When I was researching different types of wicks, I came across wooden wicks. They're lots newer than cotton wicks. Thanks for the SquidAngel blessing!

    • TheCandle LM profile image
      Author

      TheCandle LM 5 years ago

      @Virginia Allain: This type of wooden wick is fairly new. Lots newer than using a cotton wick! If you get out your candlemaking supplies, have fun with it. I love making candles. It's very relaxing to me.

    • Virginia Allain profile image

      Virginia Allain 5 years ago from Central Florida

      These were new to me. I should get my candlemaking supplies out again.

    • JJNW profile image

      JJNW 5 years ago from USA

      Nice start on this lens! I have never heard of wooden wicks. Neat. * Blessed by a SquidAngel *