ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel

Mona Lisa - Da Vinci's Magnum Opus

Updated on January 22, 2014

Few are not familiar with Leonardo da Vinci's magnum opus, the Mona Lisa, also known by some as the La Gioconda. Debatably the most famous painting in the world, the 16th century work of art depicts a woman clad in the Florentine fashion of her day and seated in a creative, mountainous landscape. Most seem to agree that what is most striking about the portrait is Mona Lisa's mysterious expression, which seems both captivating and, at the same time, aloof.

With the passage of time, Mona has overcome much including theft, x-rays, acid spills, rocks, travel, cleanings, countless criticism, and still, she is unspoiled and adored by generations!

This lens was initially conceived when my husband purchased a hand-painted copy of the Mona Lisa for our home. Originally the idea was to do a small lens on the painting's history but, it has grown, as has my interest in the painting's beauty, saga and the secrets that it holds!

So without further ado, here is my homage to the Mona Lisa painting. Hopefully you will find it as interesting as I did while I was putting this lens together.

Sections Found on this Lens

  1. Mona Lisa - History & Examination - Factsheet, timeline, Mona examined in video and an enlarged detailed photo of the masterpiece.
  2. Mona Lisa - Who was she? - Most probable theory of who Mona Lisa was, additional theories and videos.
  3. Mona Lisa Missing - What happened when Mona Lisa was stolen in 1911?
  4. Mona's Creator - Leonardo Da Vinci - Short biography, pictures including his first known drawing and videos displaying his creations.
  5. The Louvre - Mona Lisa's Home - The Louvre's history with pictures and numerous videos. Visit Mona Lisa at the Louvre.
  6. Mona Lisa Quiz - Exactly how much do you know about the Mona Lisa. Find out here.
  7. Mona Lisa Studies - From Scientific to Bizarre - Various Mona Lisa studies that have been done by the scientific community and otherwise.
  8. Mona Lisa - Artist Adaptations - Take a look at various adaptations that artists have done with Mona as their inspiration. Includes works by Andy Warhol, Marcel Duchamp and a host of others. Numerous pictures and videos for you to enjoy.
  9. Mona Lisa Related Quotes - See what others have said about Mona.
  10. Mona Lisa Fun and Games - Free Mona Lisa related game downloads, online games, a Mona related mystery for you to solve and other Mona related activities.
  11. Mona Lisa Oddities - Bizarre Mona creations, videos and sightings!
  12. Mona Lisa Songs - Songs inspired by Mona. Includes lyrics and numerous videos.
  13. Mona Lisa Cartoons - Cartoons on the Web
  14. Mona Lisa in the News - Various news articles about Mona Lisa and related subjects
  15. Mona Lisa Merchandise - See what Mona related merchandise and books are available on eBay and Amazon.
  16. Guest Book - Share your thoughts about Mona Lisa, this lens and other related topics. Would love to hear from you!

Mona Lisa - Fact Sheet

Painting Title: Mona Lisa aka La Gioconda

Artist: Leonardo da Vinci

Date: circa 1503-1507

Materials:Oil on poplar

Measurements: 77 Ã 53 cm, 30 Ã 21 in

Location: Musée du Louvre, Paris



Mona Lisa Examined - A detailed look at the Mona Lisa

Mona Lisa Timeline

1503 Leonardo began painting the Mona Lisa. According to Leonardo da Vinci's biographer, Giorgio Vasari, Leonardo worked at the painting for a little over four years, even transporting it with him during his travels and parting with it only at his death in 1519.

1530s Francois I has the Mona Lisa displayed in a semi-public art gallery at Fontainebleau

1800 Napoleon Bonaparte has the Mona Lisa hung in his bedroom in the Tuileries Palace.

1804 The Mona Lisa is placed in the Grand Gallery of the Louvre.

1910 Théophile Homolle, who at the time was the Museum's director, is asked about security at the Louvre and the Mona Lisa in particular. Homolle is reported to have laughed at the possibility of theft from the Louvre and was quoted as saying: "You might as well pretend that one could steal the towers of Notre Dame!"

1911 In August of this year the Mona Lisa is stolen from the Louvre. One-month later French detectives make their only arrest in the case, a man named Guillaume Apollinaire. During interrogation, Apollinaire implicates Pablo Picasso who in turn is brought in for questioning but quickly released. Apollinaire is released five days later. Because of the missing painting, Homolle is forced to resign as museum director.

1912 Although the whereabouts of the painting are still unknown, it is honoured in a spring parade in Paris with a float showing Mona Lisa taking off in an airplane.

1913 Alfredo Geri, an antique dealer in Florentine, receives a letter from a man in Paris named Perugia who claims to have the Mona Lisa. When they meet, Perugia presents the painting, which was hidden within a false bottom in a trunk. He is arrested. During December of the same year, the Mona Lisa is displayed at the Uffizi before taking a short tour of the museums of Italy.

1914 The Mona Lisa is returned to France and placed in the Louvre's Salon Carre. Perugia while on trial gains popularity for returning the Mona Lisa to Italy. He is sentenced to time served.

1956 The bottom part of Mona Lisa was seriously damaged when somebody doused it with acid.

1963 The Mona Lisa travels to the United States where she stays for seven weeks. Over one million six-hundred thousand visitors come to see her during her visit.

1974 The Mona Lisa takes a trip to Tokyo and to Moscow during this year. Over two million viewers take the time to visit with her.

BACK

Mona Lisa's identity - Which theory do you support?

Most portrait paintings of the time that Mona Lisa was painted had something to indicate who the sitter was such as a family name or some emblem. Unfortunately, that's not the case with Leonardo's famous painting. No information could be found among Leonardo's papers when he died and the painting itself is unsigned and undated.

According to Giorgio Vasari who wrote the first biography of Leonardo thirty-one years after his death, the painting depicts Lisa Gherardini Giocondo, the wife of a wealthy silk vendor named Francesco del Giocondo. However, some historians argue that Vasari's claims are nothing but fantasy and that he had no first hand knowledge about the sitter or painting. One thing is known for sure, Vasari was the first to name the painting "Mona Lisa" which is also known as La Gioconda in Italian or La Joconde in French. (Prior to Vasari naming the painting Mona Lisa, it was most often referred to as "A Certain Florentine Lady" and while at Fontainebleau, as "A Courtesan in a Gauze Veil.")

Of course with no precise absolute evidence available, many theories as to exactly who, or in some cases, what Mona Lisa is have surfaced. Some of the better known speculations are as follows:

- Mona Lisa is Leonardo's glorification of all women. Not a depiction of one woman but a clever fusion of many.

- The image is not of a woman at all but rather one of Da Vinci's young male models in drag.

- Dr. Lillian Schwartz of Bell Labs, who has gained much support, offers the theory that the portrait is a female version of Da Vinci himself. With the help of digital technology she discovered that Da Vinci's facial features and those of the Mona Lisa are perfectly aligned with one another. (See video below)

- The painting is not a portrait at all, rather it is simply a fictional creation of Leonardo's remarkable imagination.

- Mona Lisa was a friend of Leonardo's named Isabella d'Este who he also sketched. According to those that support this theory, the hands in the painting and the sketch are indistinguishable.

- The canvas portrays a young version of his mother which is the reason why the portrait resembles his facial features and with the foundness he had for his mother, the reason he toted it around until his death.


BACK

Mona Lisa - Self Portrait Theory - Is the Mona Lisa a Self Portrait?

A quick look at how Leonardo's portrait aligns with the portrait of Mona Lisa.

Mona Lisa Stolen From the Louvre!

"Mona Lisa Missing"...These are the words that made headlines on August 21st 1911. One of France's most notable art treasures had simply vanished. What was once thought improbable and definitely unthinkable had happened. The Mona Lisa was no-where to be found.

What Actually Happened?

The Mona Lisa went missing somewhere between 7:00 and 8:30 on Monday the 21st of August but due to unfortunate circumstances, the theft was not reported until the following day. The cleaning staff who were the first to notice the painting missing thought that it had been taken by a photographer for publication purposes. Since the Louvre was closed on Mondays for cleaning, it was not until the following day that police were contacted.

As part of the investigation, the museum was closed and searched from top to bottom. After spending an entire week searching the 49 acre museum, all the police found was the frame to the masterpiece discarded in a stairwell. There was one thumbprint found on the frame but the police were unable to match it to anyone.

On some inside information, the police eventually arrested a noted French poet named Guillaume Apollinare. He was later released but not before implicating the famous painter Pablo Picasso who in turn was also cleared of any wrongdoing. This left police where they had originally started, with no leads. Meanwhile thousands of Parisians filed into the Louvre to see the blank spot where the Mona Lisa once hung so proud.

In the interim, the real thief, Vincent Perugia who was an employee of the Louvre had left the country and was making his way back to his native Italy. How he acquired the Mona Lisa was simple. While on duty he carefully removed the Mona Lisa from the frame in which she was housed and then hid her under his smock.


The location where the Mona Lisa was once housed now empty!

In November of 1913, Perugia attempted to sell the painting to an art dealer named Alfredo Geri who was located in Italy. Mr. Geri was somewhat sceptical when he heard that Mr. Perugia was offering to sell the Mona Lisa for the sum of 50,000 lire. He and a friend went to the room of Mr. Perguia, who was using the alias of Leonardo Vincenzo, to verify the claim. Mr. Perugia carefully removed the painting from the false bottom of a trunk and allowed them to take it with them to be authenticated. They were able to confirm that yes indeed it was the Mona Lisa, and Mr. Perugia was promptly arrested and charged.

The end to this historical robbery... the museum director of the Louvre was forced to resign, one head director was fired, one suspended and numerous fines were issued to various maintenance employees. As for Perugia, he was jailed for one year and two weeks.

On Dec. 30, 1913 , after a short tour of Italy the Mona Lisa was returned to her home, the Louvre.

BACK

Leonardo di Vinci (April 15, 1452 - May 2, 1519)

Arguably one of the most prodigious and phenomenally gifted human beings in history, Leonardo da Vinci reached the pinnacle of both the scientific and artistic arena not only in his own era, but also left the kind of legacy and enigma very few in recorded history have been able to emulate or surpass. There were few pursuits that he did not excel at, and among many of his accomplishments, he was a scientist, mathematician, engineer, inventor, anatomist, painter, sculptor, architect, musician, and writer.

Even if one is not familiar with his name, there would be few that do not recognize da Vinci's most famous artworks, including the Mona Lisa featured on this lens and The Last Supper. Unfortunately, due to his inclination to experiment with new techniques that often ended in disaster, in addition to his notoriety for procrastination, very few of his paintings survive today. However, despite this, Leonardo was able to incorporate and mix his passion for art with science. His notebooks which contain drawings, scientific diagrams, and his thoughts on the nature of painting have provided the generations that have followed with much inspiration, not to mention, a wealth of information for aspiring artists. One of the drawings found within his notebooks is the now famous and somewhat iconic drawing of the Vitruvian Man (pictured to the left).

It is Leonardo's contribution as an engineer and scientist, that have established him as a visionary whose ideas, although sometimes over-exuberant, were nonetheless vastly ahead of his own time. He provided the first concepts for a helicopter, a tank, concentrated solar power, the double hull, and the theory of plate tectonics. Unfortunately, only a small fraction of his designs were constructed or even feasible during his lifetime. As a scientist, Leonardo helped advance contemporary understanding and knowledge in the fields of anatomy, optics, and hydrodynamics.

Leonardo's earliest known drawing, the Arno Valley, 1473

(Click on picture to enlarge)

The mystery and legend surrounding Leonardo da Vinci probably comes from a combination of factors. To begin with, there has been much speculation about his early life, of which few details remain today. Then there are the relationships that he struck up with the significant contemporaries of his time, including the mathematician Luca Pacioli and Niccolò Machiavelli among others, not to mention his students and pupils. As for his personal life, Leonardo kept everything other than his friendships a close secret. Furthermore, there has been much conjecture about many of his artworks, some of which the authenticity has been debated, while others appear to reveal hidden codes and messages. For all the technological wizardry modern scientists have thrown at his paintings and artworks, the original intentions of the artist still appear to elude us.

To this day, the fascination and awe people hold for Leonardo has never diminished. As much as people have come to understand and appreciate his genius in the arts and sciences, not many have come close to understanding or appreciating the man behind the myriad of wonderful creations that we still marvel at today.

BACK

Leonardo da Vinci - His Works

A collection Da Vinci's art and notes on video.

Musée du Louvre

Once a French palace and now the national art museum of France, the Louvre is one of the largest and most visited museums in the world. Located in Paris, it is not only home to the Mona Lisa but many other famous works are housed there as well. These include Leonardo da Vinci's The Virgin and Child with St. Anne, Madonna of the Rocks, Jacques Louis David's Oath of the Horatii, Delacroix's Liberty Leading the People and Alexandros of Antioch's Venus de Milo.

The Louvre was originally built as a fortress sometime at the beginning of the 13th century by Philip II Augustus. It's fundamental purpose was to defend the Seine River below Paris against the Normans and English.

When first constructed, it consisted of a thick cylindrical dungeon enclosed by towered walls. The structure was further enlarged and enhanced by Charles V in the mid 14th century only to be destroyed and rebuilt in the 16th century near the end of the reign of Francis I.

In 1564, Catherine de Médicis built a little château in a neighbouring field to the west called the Tuileries. Later on, it was decided to create an extravagant royal residence by joining the Louvre and the Tuileries with a series of buildings. The most significant of these is the Grand Galerie built during the reign of Henry IV.

During the 17th century, Louis XIII further added to the palace by adding the royal vaulted clock pavilion and recreating the Lescot's building beyond it. When Louis XIV came to power, he constructed a great square court called the Court Carree. It was shortly after this time that he decided to move the royal court to Versailles and the Louvre was abandoned as a royal residence.

After the Revolution of 1789, Napoleon I, later kings, and Napoleon III lived in the Tuileries. The Louvre itself was used for offices and a museum.

During the Revolution in 1793, the first French state museum was opened in the Louvre. It housed the former royal collections of paintings and sculptures. Since that time, many additional items have been acquired and added to the museum.

The present day Louvre includes Oriental antiquities; Egyptian antiquities; Greek and Roman antiquities; sculpture from the middle Ages to modern times; furniture and objects of art; and paintings representing all the European schools.

BACK

Visit Mona Lisa and the Louvre

Japanese Speech Expert Recreates Voice of Mona Lisa

Dr Suzuki , a Japanese forensics expert claims that by analyzing Mona Lisa's skeletal structure, he can accurately re-create her voice. After a month study that involved determining her skeletal size and construction, he investigated his findings with voice analyse software. He concluded that her voice was very low for a woman.

"Knowing her bone frame I can make her voice. We believe we were able to create voices that are very close to the real voices," he was quoted as saying when asked about his claims.

Samples of what Dr Suzuki says Mona's voice sounded like were online but unfortunately it seems that they have been removed. If anybody comes across them - please send me a link.


Related News Stories

BACK

Mona's Mysterious Smile Finally Solved!

A Dutch company has developed what they call "Computer vision software". Purported to be able to chart a person's face and analyse facial expressions based on facial points, it's purpose is to detect happiness, disgust, fear, anger, surprise and sadness with an assumed 85 percent accuracy.

When they submitted the Mona Lisa into the system, the results were that she is 83% happy. She is also 9% disgusted, 6% fearful and 2% angry.


Related News Stories

BACK

Study: Mona Lisa neither man nor da Vinci

A University of Illinois scientist named Thomas Huang has analyzed the Mona Lisa, using facial-recognition software, to determine Mona's likely gender. The scientist says that the software that he and his students developed indicates a 60-40 probability that the painting is of a female. Additionally, Huang says even if it is a man, it doesn't match well with Leonardo's sketch of himself.


Related News Stories

BACK

Noisy Secret of Mona Lisa's Smile

Christopher Tyler and Leonid Kontsevich at the Smith-Kettlewell Eye Research Institute in San Francisco contacted a study that involved manipulating a digital image of the painting by introducing random visual noise. Using 12 participants for the study, they determined that natural noise found on the painting (equivalent to the snow seen on a badly tuned TV set ) makes people observing the picture believe its expression is subtly changing.


Related News Stories

BACK

Mona Lisa - A Scientific Examination

In 2004, using highly contemporary and leading-edge techniques, a NRC research team was able to scan the painting and collect a surfeit of data that has since been analyzed in the most all-embracing study ever performed. Thanks to the detailed scan we are now able to see the layers in the painting, the shape of the wood panel, the damage and cracks and the artist's style and technique, as never before.

Bruno Mottin, one of the researchers, says that the scan revels that Da Vinci made many changes to the final painting. For example, Da Vinci originally painted Mona Lisa gripping her chair as if she were about to get up. The detailed scan also showed that Da Vinci had originally planned to paint his Mona Lisa with her hair in a cap and a few escaping curls.


Related News Stories

BACK

Row 1, Left to Right

1, 2: Iconoclastic Postcards. / 3: Postcard published when ML was stolen in 1911. "Je vais retrouver mon Vinci." / 4: Russian Iconoclastic Postcard. / 5: Keep Smiling. Postcard. 6 x 4". / 6: Postcard celebrating ML homecoming. / 7: Propoganda Postcard with the Kaiser as ML. / 8: Marinus. Stalin as Mona Lisa. 1965. Photomontage. Wilhelm-Lehmbruck Museum, Duisburg.

Row 2, Left to Right

1: Marcel Duchamp, LHOOQ. / 2: Dali as ML. / 3: J. Harold. / 4: Fernand Léger, Gioconda With Keys, 1930 35 7/8 x 28 3/4". Museé Fernand Léger, Biot. / 5: Gruel & Suyeux [?] (from a short film). / 6: M. Henry. / 7: Souzouki

Row 3, Left to Right

1: Gruel & Suyeux [?] (from a short film). / 2: Cover for Bizarre (1959), by Siné. / 3, 4, 7: From an exhibit at M.Fels (Paris, 1965). / 5: by J. Margat (from Bizarre, 1959). / 6: Photographic Negative by J. Margat (from Bizarre, 1959)

Row 4, Left to Right

1: Optical deformed ML by J. Margat (from Bizarre, 1959). / 2: Typographic ML by J. Margat (from Bizarre, 1959). / 3, 4, 5: by J. Margat (from Bizarre, 1959). / 7: Photograph by A. Felling. / 8: L.Vala. Photographic recreation of MS's profile

Row 5, Left to Right

1: German Stamps. / 2: Celebrating actress Belle Otéro. / 3: Actor Fernandel as ML. / 4: ML as a young transvestite. / 5, 6, 7: by J. Margat (from Bizarre, 1959)

BACK

Artist: Andy Warhol

Title: Mona

Date: 1963

Material: Serigraph Print

BACK

Artist: Marcel Duchamp

Title: L. H. O. O. Q.

Date: 1919

Material: Pencil on reproduction

Original Size: 7 3/4 x 4 1/8 in.

CLICK HERE TO VIEW AN ENLARGED PICTURE DUCHAMP'S MONA

BACK

Artist: Mad Magazine

Title: Mona Lisa

Date: August 1954

Material: Magazine

Value: $90 U.S. (for original magazine)

CLICK HERE TO VIEW AN ENLARGED PICTURE

BACK

The 100 Smiles of Mona Lisa

A Mona Lisa exposition called "Les 100 Sourires de Monna Lisa (The 100 Smiles of Mona Lisa)" toured Japan in 2000. The showcase featured works of artists who have parodied da Vinci's Mona Lisa. The presentation included many famous spoofs of the tour de force such as Duchamp's mockery "L.H.O.O.Q" (above) and Botero's "Mona Lisa at the Age of Thirteen." My personal favorite from the exhibit, "Back in Five Minutes" is shown below:


Artist: Sophie Matisse

Title: Back in Five Minutes

Date: 1997

Material: Oil on Canvas


Related News Stories

BACK

Mona Lisa Spoof Sites on the Net

It's amazing how many artists have produced their own versions of Mona Lisa. Here is some of the sites that I found while putting together this lens.


Cyberium.net

Author: Guido Poggi

Size: 574 x 802

Collection of Mona Lisa adaptations including the Ape Mona Lisa pictured here. (Click on picture to visit)


tralfaz-archives.com

Author: Unknown

Size: 300 x 461

Just the single picture can be found at this link. (Click on picture to visit)



Mail Art

Author: Unknown

Size: 300 x 461

Large collection of Mona Lisa adaptations including the Cube Mona Lisa pictured here. (Click on picture to visit)




BACK

Mona Lisa Adaptations Video

What others have said about Mona.

"Mona Lisa is the only beauty who went through history and retained her reputation." Will Rogers

"How could we possibly appreciate the Mona Lisa if Leonardo had written at the bottom of the canvas: 'The lady is smiling because she is hiding a secret from her lover.' This would shackle the viewer to reality, and I don't want this to happen." Annoymous

"She is older than the rocks among which she sits; like the vampire, she has been dead many times and learned the secrets of the grave. Walter Pater

"What voluptuousness - so like the seduction by the violins in the overture to Tannhauser." Maurice Denis

BACK

Da Vinci Quotes

God sells us all things for the price of labor.

He who wishes to be rich in a day will be hanged in a year.

Iron rusts from disuse, stagnant water loses its purity, and in cold weather becomes frozen, even so does inaction sap the vigor of the mind.

Make your work to be in keeping with your purpose.

Obstacles cannot crush me. Every obstacle yields to stern resolve. He who is fixed to a star does not change his mind.

Time stays long enough for anyone who will use it.

When you are alone you are all your own.

BACK

Mona Lisa Jigsaw Puzzle

Leonardo Da Vinci Paintings Jigsaw Puzzle Game

Overview: An attractive and fun puzzle game that not only includes the Mona Lisa but other Leonardo paintings as well. Some of the other paintings found in puzzle form are John the Baptist, Madonna Litta, Raring Horse and The Musician.

The game is for Windows based systems (I don't have Vista- so I could not check it) After running checks and installing, I personally found no viruses or adware.

Click Here to Download

BACK

The Mona Lisa Ransom Caper

A two minute mystery for you to solve.

The Louvre's director in charge, Théophile Homolle was pacing back and forth within his small disorganized office. With the setting where the Mona Lisa was once proudly displayed now empty, he wondered if the mystery of her disappearance would ever be solved. The whole country screamed with retribution and if the police didn't start producing results soon, the whole of France would be screaming at him too!

Just as the director was about to pack up and leave for the day, the phone rang. He quickly slouched down in his chair, and picked up the receiver.

"Bonjour."

"Monsieur Homolle?" queried a monotone voice.

"Yes."

"I have the Mona Lisa and if you want her returned, you'll pay me a ransom of 50,000 francs!"

Homolle was momentarily speechless as he tried to digest what he just heard. With the mystery of exactly how Mona disappeared having played out in his head over and over during the past few days, he asked, "How did you acquire the painting?"

"It was simple. I stowed overnight in the Louvre knowing that the next day, a Monday, the museum would be closed for cleaning. With the Lourve being chiefly vacant, I took the portrait, carefully removed it from it's frame, rolled it up and placed it under my smock. I then headed down the stairs, where I discarded the frame and promptly left the museum." After a brief ominous laugh, he continued. "It was as easy as that! So if you would like to see ..."

Homolle interrupted. "Although I am sure that the police would love to meet with you, it won't be to recover the Mona Lisa. It's obvious to me that you do not have the painting!"

How did Monsieur Homolle know that the mystery caller did not have the Mona Lisa?


Answer: Da Vinci painted his masterpiece, the Mona Lisa, on a plank of poplar wood. Since the painting is not on canvas, as the unidentified caller probably assumed, it could not have been "rolled up" and placed under his smock as he claimed.

BACK

How to paint the Mona lisa

Painting of the Mona Lisa using Microsoft paint. Original painting time 2hrs 30mins. Plays in under 5 minutes.

Mona Lisa Anagrams

Some of these are quite bizarre!

Anagrams Using - "The Mona Lisa"

A Male? Shit No!

A Smileathon!

O, Male as Hint.

Ah! I am stolen.

Ah! Not a Smile?

Lot, he is a Man.


Anagrams Using - "The Mona Lisa Gherardini del Gioconda"

Hanging art. I smile. Leonardo hid a code.


Anagrams Using - "Mona Lisa"

A Man's Oil.

I'm so Anal.

A Ms. An Oil.

BACK



Dominoes Mona Lisa

Mona Lisa reconstructed with dominoes by Robert Bosch. Instructions on how to create this piece can be found at: Mona Lisa in Dominoes

BACK

Mona Lisa Painted with Ketchup

Almost 2 gallons of ketchup and an order of fries. Measures a little more than 4ft x 3ft.



Rubik Cube Mona Lisa

Mona Lisa reconstructed with Rubik Cubes by an artist known as Space Invader. Additional information on this piece can be found at Mona Lisa's Rubik Smile

BACK

Nighttime at the Musée du Louvre - Check out what Mona is up to when the museum is closed at night.

Songs About Mona Lisa

Mona Lisa - Nat King Cole

In 1950, Mona Lisa, recorded by Nat King Cole, was listed at number #1 on Billboard for eight weeks. It was written by Ray Evans and Jay Livingston for the movie "Captain Carey USA". It went on to win the Academy Award for the most original song.

The lyrics are as follows:

Mona Lisa, Mona Lisa, men have named you

You are so like the lady with the mystic smile

It is only because you are lonely that they blame you?

For that Mona Lisa strangeness in your smile?

Do you tempt a lover, Mona Lisa?

Or is this a way to hide a broken heart?

Many dreams have been brought to your doorstep,

But they just lay there and they die there

Are you warm, are you real, Mona Lisa?

Or just a cold and lonely lovely work of art?


Mona Lisa - Willie Nelson

In 1981, Willie Nelson released the song Mona Lisa as the first track to his album "Somewhere Over The Rainbow". The album rose to #1 on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart.

The lyrics are as follows:

Mona Lisa, Mona Lisa, men have named you

You're so like the lady with the mystic smile

Is it only cause you're lonely they have blamed you?

For that Mona Lisa strangeness in your smile?

Do you smile to tempt a lover, Mona Lisa?

Or is this your way to hide a broken heart?

Many dreams have been brought to your doorstep

They just lie there and they die there

Are you warm, are you real, Mona Lisa?

Or just a cold and lonely lovely work of art?

Do you smile to tempt a lover, Mona Lisa?

Or is this your way to hide a broken heart?

Many dreams have been brought to your doorstep

They just lie there and they die there

Are you warm, are you real, Mona Lisa?

Or just a cold and lonely lovely work of art?

Mona Lisa, Mona Lisa


Other Songs About (or that mention) Mona Lisa

"Mona Lisa's and Mad Hatters" - Elton John - Released on his "Honky Chateau" album.

"Mona Lisa" - Britney Spears - Released as a B-Side in 2004

"Mona Lisa" - Slick Rick - Released on his debut album "The Great Adventures of Slick Rick"

"A Mona Lisa" - Counting Crows - Recorded in 1992 but never released

"Mona Lisa" - Guster - Released on their debut album "Parachute"

"Mona Lisa" - Wycelf Jean - Released on his debut album "The Carnival"

BACK

Mona Lisa Song Videos

Please share your thoughts about the Mona Lisa

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      Leonardo will always attract seekers!

      When I was in Paris 2005, I could not visit the Louvre. But the Louvre came with sound recording equipment, which were kindly provided by the French. Found the "Mona Lisa" and began recording background sound created numerous visitors who came to see the masterpiece. The logic was simple. Allow myself to be noted that any masterpiece has the property of highly structured information field. Man - this is also, at its basis, the field structure. There is a contact of two field structures â human and masterpiece. This is probably the power of art. The sounds published the people who were in the masterpiece (talk, the shuffling of feet, etc.) were very valuable to me, they were correlated associated with him. Subjecting these records complicated transformation process, I managed to get some incredible sound. Many are led into shock - these sounds there is a clear identification with the portrait of "Mona Lisa." Similar records I've made in the famous sculpture of Venus. As a result, based on these records, I had three works - "Knowledge", "Flow" and "Communication".

      MONA LISA_VENUS(ÐпÑÑ ÑабоÑÑ Ñ ÑедевÑами) .avi (youtube)

      Structure of presented video: sound background at Mona Lisa â result of transformational processing of a background, a sound background at Venus â result of transformational processing of a background, a work âKnowledgeâ fragment (the transformed sounds are used only).

      Full details can be found on my master class

      Academia of Music, Kishinev MOLDOVA

      (sorry, translated by google)

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      Leonardo will always attract seekers!

      When I was in Paris 2005, I could not visit the Louvre. But the Louvre came with sound recording equipment, which were kindly provided by the French. Found the "Mona Lisa" and began recording background sound created numerous visitors who came to see the masterpiece. The logic was simple. Allow myself to be noted that any masterpiece has the property of highly structured information field. Man - this is also, at its basis, the field structure. There is a contact of two field structures â human and masterpiece. This is probably the power of art. The sounds published the people who were in the masterpiece (talk, the shuffling of feet, etc.) were very valuable to me, they were correlated associated with him. Subjecting these records complicated transformation process, I managed to get some incredible sound. Many are led into shock - these sounds there is a clear identification with the portrait of "Mona Lisa." Similar records I've made in the famous sculpture of Venus. As a result, based on these records, I had three works - "Knowledge", "Flow" and "Communication".

      MONA LISA_VENUS(ÐпÑÑ ÑабоÑÑ Ñ ÑедевÑами) .avi (youtube)

      Structure of presented video: sound background at Mona Lisa â result of transformational processing of a background, a sound background at Venus â result of transformational processing of a background, a work âKnowledgeâ fragment (the transformed sounds are used only).

      Full details can be found on my master class

      Academia of Music, Kishinev MOLDOVA

      (sorry, translated by google)

    • JeffGilbert profile image

      JeffGilbert 4 years ago

      Well, this is definitely a very unique lens about a painting that's actually a cultural icon. I don't think any painting has acquired the mass appeal and familiarity in our culture that just saying the name, people now what it is right away. Great lens, very educational.

    • takkhisa profile image

      Takkhis 4 years ago

      Mona Lisa is a great artwork in the world.

    • profile image

      rafael-portilho 4 years ago

      Really complete article.

    • profile image

      supersiva 5 years ago

      Wow. What an insight about Mona Lisa - Incredible panting of mona lisa in MSPAINT - Really great lens - Thanks

    • profile image

      cmadden 5 years ago

      I very much enjoyed this lens.

    • SMW1962 LM profile image

      SMW1962 LM 5 years ago

      I love the Mona Lisa and love learning the history of this beautiful painting. Thank You!

    • JohnTannahill profile image

      John Tannahill 5 years ago from Somewhere in England

      By the way, this is something to do with that smile quest - so please smile. Thanks. Liked the lens. I've actually seen the real Mona Lisa - at least that's what we were told - but I think the Rubik cube version is better.

    • Kara Hara profile image

      Kara Hara 5 years ago

      Thanks for the interesting lens

    • Ben Reed profile image

      Ben Reed 5 years ago

      Iconic art. I remember the Mona Lisa being discussed as a child - and we are still discussing it today - amazing.

    • profile image

      crstnblue 5 years ago

      Excellent lens on this topic. Very informative and thoughtful content.

      Thanks for sharing and getting the chance to learn something new today!

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      Really enjoyed this! thanks.

    • MrsPotts profile image

      MrsPotts 6 years ago

      Da Vinci is one of my favorite historical figures. However, I had no idea the Mona Lisa has such an interesting history. For a painting, she truly has a life of her own!

    • JohanVanGeyt profile image

      Johan 6 years ago from Belgium

      This is really a great lens. Leonardo would love it.

    • oilpainting3 profile image

      oilpainting3 6 years ago

      Great lens. I have seen the original painting so this is cool

    • oilpainting3 profile image

      oilpainting3 6 years ago

      Great lens. I have seen the original painting so this is cool

    • SweetMarie83 LM profile image

      SweetMarie83 LM 6 years ago

      Wow, what an amazing, info-packed lens! I've always had a fascination with the Mona Lisa...I went to the Louvre when I was 17 and my best friend knew how much I wanted to see the painting up close so she elbowed her way to the front with me in tow so I could stand at the front of the crowd, right in front of the Mona Lisa...it was a great moment! :-)

    • ChrisDay LM profile image

      ChrisDay LM 6 years ago

      Nice thanks for the great homage to a great work of art - we've seen her and it is amazing to be there.

    • profile image

      WeirdStuff 6 years ago

      Complex lens, this is how it should look like! Mona Lisa is one of the greatest paintings, I was lucky to see it on my own eyes

    • profile image

      termit_bronx 6 years ago

      Great job on this lens, very informative and a lot of great content!

    • myraggededge profile image

      myraggededge 6 years ago

      Comprehensive and informative lens. I learned lots. Blessed :-)

    • KOrazem profile image

      Seeking Pearls 6 years ago from Pueblo West

      What a fascinating collection of facts you have gathered here. I didn't realize the Mona Lisa had been stolen. Very interesting story. Great Job!

    • profile image

      Brewmaster101 7 years ago

      Wow - probably the most time I have ever spent on a lens! I enjoyed every minute of it!

    • profile image

      anonymous 7 years ago

      wow coooooooool

    • profile image

      anonymous 7 years ago

      Cool

    • PromptWriter profile image

      Moe Wood 7 years ago from Eastern Ontario

      Greetings! You have a lovely lens and it has been blessed.

    • profile image

      jasonweb20 7 years ago

      this is great lens....lot of collective information on Mona Lisa - Da Vinci's Magnum Opus... thanks for sharing :)

    • LaurenIM profile image

      LaurenIM 7 years ago

      I am a fan of Mona Lisa's smile. I often...just today, in fact...attempt to mimic her smile as I am doing my errands. Long ago, I heard that to do this is a very good way to meditate.Truly an art piece from a multi-layered artist! I thoroughly enjoyed your lens. Very interesting and entertaining.

    • fastpassport profile image

      fastpassport 7 years ago

      This is like the definitive guide to Da Vinci's Mona Lisa. You've included everything anyone would want to know about this fantastic work of art and then some. Congrats on the great lens.

    • profile image

      richstanford79 7 years ago

      Mona Lisa - Da Vinci's Magnum Opus Is The Hottest Toy On The Market is really cool lens i have came across... thanks for sharing :)

    • Andy-Po profile image

      Andy 8 years ago from London, England

      Great lens. I have seen the Mona Lisa a few times over the years. A beautiful painting, but it's a shame that it is so famous and draws such a crowd.

    • dahlia369 profile image

      dahlia369 8 years ago

      Outstanding!! My mom just returned from Paris a couple of weeks ago and told me that the crowds in Louvre still gather around Mona Lisa - my mom had a hard time to get close enough to see the painting... :)

    • profile image

      anonymous 8 years ago

      Oops! Forgot to add. 5*'s all the way for this encyclopedia of a lens.

    • profile image

      anonymous 8 years ago

      Hi,

      I have featured your lens here => How to think like Leonardo da Vinci

      Hope you approve of it.

      Cheers!

    • Aquavel profile image

      Aquavel 8 years ago

      What a terrific lens. I thought I knew a lot about the Mona Lisa, but you've gathered together a vast amount of info that I've never read or heard about. I had thought that the Mona Lisa was actually a painting of Leonardo's mother, a Middle-Eastern female slave named Caterina, who worked for Leonardo's father and who was dismissed by being married off to a worker soon after Leonardo's birth. But most of the evidence I've come across actually points to her being the wife of a wealthy silk vendor. ~ Love those Mona Lisa adaptions. 5*s!

    • Franksterk profile image

      Frankie Kangas 8 years ago from California

      Fabulous lens. Love all the controversy or stories about Mona Lisa. 5 stars and a favorite. I'm already a big fan! Bea hugs, Frankie aka Bearmeister

    • Franksterk profile image

      Frankie Kangas 8 years ago from California

      Fabulous lens. Love all the controversy or stories about Mona Lisa. 5 stars and a favorite. I'm already a big fan! Bea hugs, Frankie aka Bearmeister

    • rewards4life info profile image

      rewards4life info 8 years ago

      Fantastic piece of work, you really have covered everything. What a beautiful painting and with so much history. I knew some of it but this has opened my eyes. I had heard about the Shroud of Turin but seeing the video is remarkable. 5* and a favorite

    • profile image

      ReturningToLearning 8 years ago

      WOW! What an amazing collection of Mona Lisa info. I love the anagrams :)

      Well done. I don't think there is anywhere else I need to go to learn more about Mona Lisa. Thanks

    • profile image

      getbacklinks 8 years ago

      Now that is a great history of the Mona Lisa!

      So much I did not know, I will pass the link on for this lens...

    • profile image

      CaseyNine 8 years ago

      I think everything about Mona Lisa can be found here. What a huge lens. I just watched on Heroes it was stolen by the lightning fast girl. There's something creepy about the La Gioconda though. It feels somehow alive to me.

    • profile image

      Sophie12 8 years ago

      Very good and interesting informatino. This has got to be one of the most comprehensive pages on Mona Lisa. Thanks for another interesting lens.

    • profile image

      mariane 8 years ago

      My your lens has been well researched and I have out with lots of information I was not aware of. Who would have thought that such a painting would web such a story of intrigue

    • profile image

      Bisley 8 years ago

      I actually did go to see the Mona Lisa years ago. I had no idea about all this information about her though. This is truly an excellent lens.

    • profile image

      shineystones 8 years ago

      Wow, what a detailed write up on what is probably the most famous painting in the world. Tons of good information.

    • profile image

      Debt_Man 8 years ago

      WOW what a comprehensive collection of info on the Mona Lisa, probably one of the most famous paintings of all time. I could write a report from all of the info here lol

    • profile image

      Debt_Man 8 years ago

      WOW what a comprehensive collection of info on the Mona Lisa, probably one of the most famous paintings of all time. I could write a report from all of the info here lol

    • profile image

      Debtguru1 8 years ago

      Wow, I had no idea there was so much information out there on the Mona Lisa. It makes me wonder: "What would Leonardo da Vinci think of all that has become of this one painting?"

    • profile image

      718raul 8 years ago

      This is a great lens. I have always wanted to go to see the Mona Lisa. I hope one day I shall. Thanks.

    • profile image

      718raul 8 years ago

      This is a great lens. I have always wanted to go to see the Mona Lisa. I hope one day I shall. Thanks.

    • profile image

      jseminario 8 years ago

      You have an awesome lens here. I got the privilege to see this painting a long time ago and it was captivating.

    • profile image

      anonymous 8 years ago

      Wow! This is just awesome!

      Mona Lisa is a masterpiece and so is this lens...

      Thanks for the great info :)

    • profile image

      anonymous 8 years ago

      I want to go to the Louvre Museum someday to see The Mona Lisa...^^ for me, she's indeed a masterpiece! Timeless!

    • profile image

      Dean Caporella 8 years ago

      I find this information fascinating. We've had an imitation copy of Mona Lisa hanging on our wall for years and I never really gave it much thought. Da Vinci I know and have done a lot of research on by the Mona Lisa was really a mystery until now. Thanks...great information.

    • MargoPArrowsmith profile image

      MargoPArrowsmith 8 years ago

      5* I love it! 5* and I am going to link it to my lens on the Louvre. If you want to know the best time to see her, check it out.

      https://hubpages.com/travel/thelouvrelittleknownto...

    • Karendelac profile image

      Karendelac 9 years ago

      This is still one of my favorite sites

      Super job.

      An easy 5 stars !

      Soooooooo much more informative than Wikipedia !

      Good job, you go girl !

      Warm wishes,

      karen

    • Charlino99 profile image

      Tonie Cook 9 years ago from USA

      Da Vinci is one of my favorite artists of all time, and definitely an artist ahead of his time. Mona Lisa rocks. This is a wonderfully informative site.

    • profile image

      Rukia 9 years ago

      I love this lens and it's put together very well. I came here not knowing very much about her and now I know so much!!

    • JenniferAkers LM profile image

      JenniferAkers LM 9 years ago

      Incredible lens! Intriguing and informative! It's obvious you put a lot of work and creativity in making a fun page with great info. I loved reading the percentage of Mona's happiness. Who knew? :-)

      Best, Jennifer Akers

    • kathysart profile image

      kathysart 9 years ago

      ~~*~~

      Oooohhhh! I LOVE your lens and the style you do it in. It reminds me of some of mine... if I do say so myself! lol!!

      Check out my new lens:

      Who is Rumi?

      https://hubpages.com/religion-philosophy/rumiquote

      "Out beyond ideas of right doing and wrong doing, there is a field. I'll meet you there." ~ Rumi

      Aloha, Kathy

      ~~*~~

    • GypsyPirate LM profile image

      GypsyPirate LM 9 years ago

      What a spectacular page. I truly enjoyed reading this, thank you for all of your hard work to bring it together so beautifully.