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Toy Photography

Updated on August 5, 2013

How to Take Fun and Engaging Pictures of Toys

Toys are fantastic props for photography, and allow you to capture shots that would be expensive, dangerous, or downright impossible to achieve with live subjects.

Taking interesting pictures of toys is easy. They are, after all, made to be entertaining! Of course, not all pictures of toys do much to catch the eye, and there's a wee bit more to the magic of good toy pictures than waving a camera in the general direction of a doll or stuffed animal. But not much more!

A few simple guidelines can help you take great pictures of just about any toy. Conveniently, these rules and techniques apply to other photographic subjects, too, and toys, being very patient models, are a great way to practice. Photography is relatively new to me, and I love trying out new techniques using toys as my subjects. They never fidget, and they're not disappointed if they pose for a set that doesn't turn out as awesome as expected.

You can take intriguing, eye-catching pictures of toys with beginner-level photography skills and any camera. Use your DSLR or the three megapixel camera on your old cell phone, any editing software you like or none at all. As an added bonus, "experimenting with toy photography," is a really productive-sounding way to phrase Saturday afternoons spent playing with action figures.

All photographs taken by the author.

What Makes Your Toys Special? - Toys Have Personalities

The tiny night chef in his kitchen.
The tiny night chef in his kitchen.

When you imagine your toy in its natural habitat, what does it look like there? Toys, especially toys with faces, have personalities. Treat them as though they were dear friends sitting for portraits or daring stuntmen hired for an action shot, rather than as objects within the context of our larger world.

In practical terms, this usually means getting in close and choosing your lighting carefully. The tiny chef in the picture above is only about an inch tall, and cheaply made. To my eyes, he's a cheery little fellow with a quirky grin. Without the right camera positioning and some careful lighting choices, though, he's just a nondescript plastic trinket. Placing the camera low and close lends him stature, and lighting by carefully aimed flashlight lets me show him as I imagine him at night, capering unobserved through my darkened kitchen.

Choosing Toys to Photograph - Go With What You Love

A lone survivor, the zombie hordes close behind him.
A lone survivor, the zombie hordes close behind him.

The easiest way to choose toys for your pictures is to simply opt for the playthings you know and love. Your favorite doll, action figure, model car, or decoder ring is already rich with significance to you. You already know its style, and can easily choose a setting and pose that will accentuate its best qualities.

I'm a zombie nut, and I love using my toys to bring my apocalyptic daydreams to life with my camera. I don't have the time or energy after a day at work to stage and shoot a dramatic zombie scene with human actors, but with dolls and figurines it's a simple matter of a few minutes arranging and lighting my treasures.

Think About Your Angle - Experiment with Positioning

Close up and from above, this doll shows the wistful look that I love about her.
Close up and from above, this doll shows the wistful look that I love about her.

Many times, a toy's special appeal pops into focus when it is photographed from an interesting angle. For dolls and other humanoid toys, a head-on shot centered on the face can have the same dull, flattening effect found in uninspired portraits of humans. With toys, it's easy to try angles that would be awkward to manage with a live model.

Instead of relying on your camera's built-in flash, use a small, hand-held flashlight to illuminate your subject and add creative highlights. Taken off-camera, lighting can add a lot of impact to any scene. At full scale, fancy theatrical lighting can be expensive and difficult to arrange. For dolls and small toys, though, a small flashlight is all you need to set the perfect mood with lighting.

Toys with a Dark Side - Creepy Clowns and Dastardly Dolls

A quietly staring doll can be terrifying in a shadowy room.
A quietly staring doll can be terrifying in a shadowy room.

Anyone with an active imagination and an affinity for horror movies knows that toys can be very, very creepy. Toys aren't just for cheerful, cartoonish photographs. Let a flashlight brush over its features in a darkened room, and just about any doll can give you goosebumps.

This lovely lass, so calm and innocent by day, has stared shivers down my spine on many a gloomy evening. I have yet to capture the true depth of her creepy side with the camera, but my attempts are growing ever closer.

Have a Lot of Fun - This is the Most Important Rule

Monkey business.
Monkey business.

If you want a toy to pose nicely for you, play with it. Toys and fun go together like... well, toys and fun. If you're not sure how best to showcase a particular toy, spend some time goofing around with it in front of the camera, and just pause at random intervals to take a picture. For fun and unique pictures, capture your toys relaxed, at play in their natural habitats.

More Toy Photography - Artists I Love

Given what fun and versatile photo subjects toys can be, it's not surprising that they've been used to wonderful effect by a wide range of talented artists. Here are some of the artists who inspire me to work to improve my photographic technique... and my toy collection.

Do you follow any great toy photographers, or enjoy photographing your own favorite toys? Share your tips, stories, questions, and general thoughts on toy photography here.

Do You Take Pictures of Your Toys? - Comments, Questions, Musings, Ravings and General Shenanigans Welcome

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    • Virginia Allain profile image

      Virginia Allain 2 years ago from Central Florida

      I take photos of my 1950s Toni doll but mostly to use in my pages about doll clothes I make for her. I like the special lighting and effects you used with the toys.

    • hntrssthmpsn profile image
      Author

      hntrssthmpsn 4 years ago

      @lesliesinclair: Hahah not so sweet... I suppose not! Plenty of room for sweetness with toy pictures, though... must be the photographer who's not so sweetly inclined here ;)

    • hntrssthmpsn profile image
      Author

      hntrssthmpsn 4 years ago

      @tobydavis: Thank you!

    • hntrssthmpsn profile image
      Author

      hntrssthmpsn 4 years ago

      @Rhonda Lytle: Thank you! It's reassuring to hear that it's not just me who finds dolls spooky.

    • hntrssthmpsn profile image
      Author

      hntrssthmpsn 4 years ago

      @Titia: No toys? I can't even imagine such a thing... my son outgrew most of his toys years ago, but mom's collection is still going strong ;)

    • hntrssthmpsn profile image
      Author

      hntrssthmpsn 4 years ago

      @Gypzeerose: I love it that you're planning children's books! I think toy photography would be such a great medium for illustrations, and can't wait to see what you come up with.

    • lesliesinclair profile image

      lesliesinclair 4 years ago

      Sweet (well, not so sweet, really) and Simple demonstration of how to get some strong effects while photographing toys. Innovative presentation.

    • tobydavis profile image

      tobydavis 4 years ago

      Wonderful lens filled with so many magical images that thrill and inspire the imagination!

    • Rhonda Lytle profile image

      Rhonda Lytle 4 years ago from Deep in the heart of Dixie

      I so enjoyed this lens! It's adorable and now I want toys :). Further, your toys with a dark side picture is horror movie cover art type scary. Great job!

    • Titia profile image

      Titia Geertman 4 years ago from Waterlandkerkje - The Netherlands

      Congrats on the raffle ticket. I don't have toys anymore but I love photography and I love the way you're using it. Thanks for sharing.

    • Gypzeerose profile image

      Rose Jones 4 years ago

      This is really inspiring, even though I don't consider myself a photographer. Still, I need to photograph toys for eBay work I am starting, as well as considering the possibilities of using them to illustrate children's books that I am interested in creating.