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Trina Schart Hyman|Fantasy Art|Fairy Tales

Updated on May 11, 2013

Trina Schart Hyman-Illustrator-Artist-Fantasy Art-Children's Books

Trina Schart Hyman was a children's book illustrator of fantasy art and fairy tales.

I first began collecting children's books because of the wonderful illustrators that are found in them. Trina Schart Hyman is one of my favorites.

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Turn on the music!

Listen to some BEAUTIFUL Music while you discover how remarkable the work of Trina Schart Hyman is!

The lyrics are posted here to this song as well.

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Great Trina Schart Hyman Items

Quotes- Trina Schart Hyman

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Quotes- Trina Schart Hyman:

"Book illustration can be an isolating experience. You work at home for months, send off a finished set of illustrations, and unless the book is a howling success, you never get any real feedback. It's very lonely work, as I imagine writing is. On the other hand, when I'm in the middle of a book, I would love to be a solitary hermit on the top of a mountain in Tibet."

from Something about the Author, Volume 46.

"I don't do sketches, or preliminaries. I think about it instead. I think about the story and about what it means and about how it can be brought to life in pictures. I think about the characters and what makes them tick and where they're coming from and where they might be going to."

"I think about all this a lot. I think about it so much that eventually I start to dream about it. And when my dreams start to become the dreams of the characters in the book, when their reality becomes a part of my subconscious, when I can live in their landscape, when I put on a little red cape with a hood and tie the red ribbons under my chin, then I know what to do with my pictures."

from her 1985 Caldecott Medal Speech.

Red Riding Hood & Her Mom by Trina Schart Hyman

Red Riding Hood & Her Mom by Trina Schart Hyman
Red Riding Hood & Her Mom by Trina Schart Hyman

"My Best Information Comes From all Those Flowers Who Speak Loudest When I Fall"

"My Best Information Comes From all Those Flowers Who Speak Loudest When I Fall"

Dismissing coincidences

tis a dichotomy

... bleeding

I was hoping to undress those shelters

and see them refined

as true.

Notice spinning wheels

might be a good thing.

Isn't that how bicycles travel?

My best information

comes from all those flowers

who speak loudest when I fall.

Leaves on trees reach for me.

So kind of them.

Oh my dear veins on green

so sorry

I do apologize

I cannot fit you all inside my pocket.

Smiles as I look to the palm of my hand

sighing

there would be not one special

and yet...

I will forever gaze at their families.

I then picked as many as I could

put them in a crystal vase

and set them on my bedside table.

Oh Lily

remember me.

Art fills our core

with nebulous strokes of a genuine emotion,

that appreciates beauty

and peoples efforts to create

new things.

I want to feel that spirit.

I've fumbled along

more than awkward strides

but I stepped out and looked around

and I simply could not resist

those endless spaces I saw

those endless strokes of freedom

brushstrokes of serendipity

trying to reach for home

Still waiting?

Heroes making discoveries

through accidents

helping simple flowers

sagaciously.

Send a thank you note to all those fairies

will you?

I never realized

how important they were

until I stumbled upon a faraway field

of wild flowers.

What a lovely basket of good fortune

noticing

finally.

Lily came by one afternoon

you remember her fretting?

She said she might be returning

back to those silent mornings

no one home

or at least no one answering.

I said no Lily

run...

run towards life.

And soo...

I did.

25 April 2009

by Kathy Ostman-Magnusen

Copyright 2009

The image is of my painting "Swan Song" a 30x40 oil,gold leaf on canvas. The original is available through Monkdogz Urban Art, NY http://www.monkdogz.com

Quick, what do you think of Trina Schart Hyman?

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Music to Create By

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Music to fill the air as you read, draw, paint or just enjoy the beauty around you.

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Snow White, Illustrated by Trina Schart Hyman

Snow White, Illustrated by Trina Schart Hyman
Snow White, Illustrated by Trina Schart Hyman

Writing and Illustrating Books

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Want to dabble into Tina's world by trying your hand at children's book illustration or writing?

Here are a few helpful books as well as more of

Trina Schart Hyman

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"Faery Dragons Roar For Prisoners of Lost Youth and Thus They Cried For a Beautiful Queens Passing"

Youth sought after and a Faery Dragons longing to give a queen eternal youth... to no avail.

"Faery Dragons Roar For Prisoners of Lost Youth and Thus They Cried For a Beautiful Queens Passing"

Faery dragons

roar for prisoners of beauty

when they are caught

in-between

the seasons.

It's true.

Yet more to this tale

of a dragon's queen

seasoned forever

blue.

Victims of time

that age doth ultimately meet

ignoring any setting suns

or romantic affairs

a hero doth meet.

Their set plans

despite anyone's time-line

destiny is of a certainty

pursued.

Protecting herself from the glass

a queen glanced shyly into a mirror.

Ohh, "If only"

was her lament.

If only a different circumstance

age had greeted

a youthful repose

and yet..

No.

Disbelieving strangers

as they said it was not true

a narcissistic queen

left the hallway

and walked into her own

lonely

gloom.

Perhaps it was a fairy dragon

needing her at a dawning midnight

to enhance the queens beauty

and find here forever youthfully

for him

groomed.

Spirits of the dead

sounding off with their whistles

reaching whatever vibrations

a dragon once slain

might recall.

There will thus

always be

gentle souls

who circle round a babies laughter

tending to the scents in the air.

Babies breath

bringing the lovely sound of flowers

to cradle every infants gateway

in a bed of roses

and whisper of loving

care.

So beware

to those who seek a youthful view

for the queen did pass

once she left the dragons room.

Slipping into a trance

of a sparkle

on a lake

that let the moon shine through.

Into a destiny

nebulous swoon

for after the queen met a babies laughter

the fairy dragon sadly

knew...

His queen

mortal be

slipped past eternity

and into the galaxy

of a wilting flowers bloom.

Copyright 2009

by Kathy Ostman-Magnusen

The image is of my painting "Lost at Sea" it is a 60x72 oil on canvas

Judy Collins - Gaelic Lullaby

Trina Schart Hyman

Taken from UTube by access810

Do check out their UTube Channel!

Born in Philadelphia to Margaret Doris Bruck and Albert H. Schart, she grew up in a rural area of Pennsylvania and learned to read and draw at an early age. Her favorite story as a child was Little Red Riding Hood, and she spent an entire year of her childhood wearing a red cape.

She enrolled at the Philadelphia Museum College of Art (now part of the University of the Arts in 1956, but moved to Boston, Massachusetts, in 1959 after marrying Harris Hyman, a mathematician and engineer. She graduated from School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, in 1960.

The couple then moved to Stockholm, Sweden, for two years, where Trina studied at the Konstfackskolan (Swedish State Art School) and illustrated her first children's book, titled Toffe och den lilla bilen (Toffe and the Little Car).

In 1963, the couple's daughter, Katrin Tchana (n Hyman), was born, but in 1968, they divorced, and Trina and Katrin moved to New Hampshire. Trina lived for some time with the children's writer and editor Barbara Rogasky (with whom she collaborated on several projects). For about the last decade of her life, her partner was teacher Jean K. Aull.[1]

Trina Schart Hyman served as art director of Cricket Magazine from 1973 to 1979 but contributed regularly to the publication until her death. Her books have won numerous awards, including the Caldecott medal for illustrating Little Red Riding Hood in 1984, the Caldecott medal for Saint George and the Dragon by Margaret Hodges in 1985, and Caldecott honors for Hershel and the Hanukkah Goblins by Eric Kimmel in 1990 and A Child's Calendar by John Updike in 2000; an honor book in the Boston Globe-Horn Book Awards for illustration in 1968 for All in Free but Janey and in 1978 for On to Widecombe Fair, and the Boston Globe-Horn Book Award for illustration in 1973 for King Stork. Many of her ilustrations can be quite complex. For example, in one scene in Saint George and the Dragon, the dragon's tail stretches into the border artwork of the next page.[1]

She is also considered one of the first white American illustrators to regularly incorporate Black characters into her illustrations, as a matter of principle, in large part triggered by her daughter's marriage to a man from Cameroon. Her grandchildren appear in several of her books.

She died from breast cancer, aged 65, on November 19, 2004. The third book she completed with her daughter was published in 2006, which was titled Changing Woman and Her Sisters, Goddesses from Around the World.

Celtic Woman - The Soft Goodbye

Share your stories, sightings, thoughts, rants, raves...

More about

Trina Schart Hyman

Born: 8-Apr-1939

Birthplace: Philadelphia, PA

Died: 19-Nov-2004

Location of death: Lebanon, NH

Cause of death: Cancer - Breast

Gender: Female

Religion: Jewish

Race or Ethnicity: White

Sexual orientation: Bisexual

Occupation: Artist

Nationality: United States

Executive summary: Children's book illustrator

Educated at Philadelphia College of Art, and Boston Museum School of Fine Arts. Hyman lived in Sweden for two years in the 1960s and attended art college there as well. While she was there, Astrid Lindgren offered her a job illustrating a children's book. In all, Hyman has illustrated over one hundred children's books, primarily fairy tales. She has lived in New Hampshire for over thirty years.

Father: Albert H. Schart

Mother: Margaret Doris Bruck

Husband: Harris Hyman (engineer, m. 1959, div. 1968)

Daughter: Katrin Tchana (b. 1963)

University: Philadelphia Museum College of Art (attended 1956-59)

University: Boston Museum School of Fine Arts (1960)

University: Swedish State Art School, Stockholm, Sweden

Caldecott Medal 1984 for Saint George and the Dragon

German Ancestry

Risk Factors: Smoking, Arthritis, Breast Cancer

Illustrated books:

The Sleeping Beauty, 1977, AUTHOR: Trina Schart Hyman, DETAILS: Little Brown & Co.

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Shout Out For Trina Schart Hyman!

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    • goo2eyes lm profile image

      goo2eyes lm 5 years ago

      squidangel blessings for trina.

    • profile image

      julieannbrady 5 years ago

      So true ...

      "My best information

      comes from all those flowers

      who speak loudest when I fall."

    • profile image

      poutine 5 years ago

      Thanks for this delightful introduction to a very talentend illustrator.

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      Nice to know Trina Schart Hyman. She's so talented.

      Thanks again for the support and blessing my "Celine Dion's "All By My Self" The Versions: Wo Sang The Most Powerful Version?" lens.

      As a token of appreciation, I have featured this lens on my new lens "10 Things About Rhian Ramos That Her Fans Should Know."

      Hope you like it, friend.

    • goo2eyes lm profile image

      goo2eyes lm 5 years ago

      beautiful illustrations by trina. once i see this illustration of her, i will remember you-kathy!

    • ResearchAddict profile image

      ResearchAddict 6 years ago

      Great lens! I love children's art! Also I noticed you were a fan of steampunk art, I have several steampunk related lenses if you'd like to take a peek.

    • WildFacesGallery profile image

      Mona 6 years ago from Iowa

      Her work is really lovely. Thanks for introducing her.

    • profile image

      RebeccaE 6 years ago

      this is a fabulous lens, the artwork that she did is stunning and it is really too bad she died at a young age.

    • ronpass lm profile image

      ronpass lm 6 years ago

      Thanks Kathy for introducing Trina Schart Hyman - Illustrators are the forgotten artists. I know I am guilty at times of overlooking their significant contribution to a book - it's mood and message. Trina points out that the book illustrator's life is a lonely existence - often not acknowledged or rewarded. You would have to love this form of art to persist in the absence of regular, positive feedback. I can relate to Trina's comments that she often dreams of the book and the illustration. I did this once on a small scale - I dreamed of the illustration for the front cover of a book I was editing ("Restraint of Love" - about abuse). I was then able to get an accomplished artist to paint the picture for the book cover. By the way, I was absorbed by the beautiful Celtic singing (Soft Goodbye) that I played while I read your lens. Thanks for the recommendation - it created a peaceful mood.

    • TriviaChamp profile image

      TriviaChamp 6 years ago

      Another great lens Kathy. Kudos.

    • Virginia Allain profile image

      Virginia Allain 7 years ago from Central Florida

      I started my library career as a children's librarian. Trina Shart Hyman was a favorite illustrator. I also like Arthur Rackham.

    • profile image

      anonymous 7 years ago

      I love your lens, great work. Long live the Arts

      Philadelphia Venues and Worldwide Artists get Together

    • ChristopherScot1 profile image

      ChristopherScot1 9 years ago

      I love how all of your lenses are based on art and music. Keep up the hard work. Come over to A DAY OF HOPE

    • kerryg lm profile image

      kerryg lm 9 years ago

      She was my favorite children's book illustrator.

    • GypsyPirate LM profile image

      GypsyPirate LM 9 years ago

      Wonderful lens - you've got great information here.

    • profile image

      Shellrose 9 years ago

      Beautiful art!