ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel

5 Reasons You Should Go Find Your Dream Car and Buy It

Updated on January 13, 2012

My Classic Car, What's Yours?

My 1964 Impala SS with 115,000 actual miles, ready to hit the road in Seattle.
My 1964 Impala SS with 115,000 actual miles, ready to hit the road in Seattle. | Source
Another crop of classics ready to go.  While my Dad liked the Corvette, I thought the 64 Malibu SS Convertible was rather nice.
Another crop of classics ready to go. While my Dad liked the Corvette, I thought the 64 Malibu SS Convertible was rather nice. | Source
Hittin' the 405 to get out of Seattle and on the road.
Hittin' the 405 to get out of Seattle and on the road. | Source

More pictures of my car.

The Impala is slightly smaller than a missile.  These were on display just down the road from the Golden Spike Railroad Museum in Utah.
The Impala is slightly smaller than a missile. These were on display just down the road from the Golden Spike Railroad Museum in Utah. | Source
What were the Aqua Teen Hunger Force guys doing on a wall in the middle of nowhere?
What were the Aqua Teen Hunger Force guys doing on a wall in the middle of nowhere? | Source
Rock in the rearview mirror.  No reason really.  Just bored and taking pictures.
Rock in the rearview mirror. No reason really. Just bored and taking pictures. | Source
I like the reflections on the hood.  Dad and I had gone south into Arizona and New Mexico to avoid a big storm in Colorado.  We eventually got rain, but never snow.
I like the reflections on the hood. Dad and I had gone south into Arizona and New Mexico to avoid a big storm in Colorado. We eventually got rain, but never snow. | Source

I got mine, now you get yours!

When I was in high school, I worked, but never had tons of money. The first thing I ever bought was a 1950 GMC 1/2 ton pickup. That was in 1987, a few months before I had a driver's license. It was not a dream vehicle, it was a $750 piece of transportation.

My second purchase came a couple of months later, right when I got my license. A guy who used to sell me hubcaps (he was with a road mowing crew and I sold hubcaps out of my dad's tire store) came in with a trunk full of hubcaps and a "For Sale" sign on his car. It was a 1964 Chevrolet Impala Super Sport with most of the options you could buy in '64. It was also a primer-red low-rider that smoked like there was a fire underneath it. For $750, I didn't see how I could go wrong.

I drove that car until it fell apart. I went through 2 engines, 2 paint jobs, and no telling how many tires. It finally got parked, pending enough cash to make it worth driving again. I finally gave up and sold it to help finance the business I then owned, an arcade.

After I finally closed the arcade and got a real job that paid me money, I wanted another 64 Impala SS. My wife agreed to the crazy idea and I finally bought one. That's another story.

Here are the reasons you should do what you want to do. You might be able to influence your significant other with this logic, but I doubt it.

#1 Classic Cars are Cheap. It depends on what you want, but if you're not dreaming of some super-rare race car that cost a fortune when new, you can probably afford one. My Impala cost less than 2/3 of what my wife's Camry did.

#2 If Maintained, They Go Up in Value. Yes, right now they've dropped a bit because of the economy, but if you pay a reasonable price, you can expect to get that back out of it when you sell it. What's a reasonable price? Consult the National Auto Dealer Association's (NADA) Classic Car Price Guide Book, thumb through a Hemming's Motor News, or look at what similar items have been selling for on eBay. If you pay too much, you're still not going to look at the same kind of drop in value that comes with driving a new car off of the showroom floor.

#3 If Maintained, They're Reliable. While there are exceptions to this rule and you do need to know the difference between a spark plug and the radiator, classic cars keep going. I bought my car in Seattle and drove it home to Abilene, TX over a 4-day weekend. My 3-day temporary tag expired 2 hours before I got home. Until I took the car in to get it repainted, I drove it to work every day. I don't put a lot of miles on the car during the week, just 40 or so, but I am not afraid to hop in it and drive back to Seattle or anywhere.

#4 Classics Start Conversations. I have a co-worker with a fairly new Dodge truck tricked out in chrome and giant wheels. It's his pride and joy. He noticed that someone was taking pictures of my car in the parking lot one day and said something like, "no one ever wants to take pictures of my truck." Old cars bring back good memories. Your old car may be a rust-bucket that you're fixing up, but everyone sees them through rose-tinted glasses. They don't see your car, they see THEIR car, like it was or like it will be. I don't think I've ever filled up with gas and didn't have someone come up and talk to me about my car.

#5 Your Car is You. I had a friend who turned their old Toyota into an art car. Your classic is much the same. It says something about you. It may be so simple as, "I like giant gold cars named after deer-like animals from Africa." It may be, "I like gluing pigs to my car." Whatever it is, an old car is communicating something that a new car can't. Yes, they were mass-produced back in their time, but most of them are gone.

There are some pitfalls. I'll address them in another Hub later. I suggest you print this Hub and cut this last bit out. Remember when selling to your significant other, there are only good points, never bad. Actually, you better tell them. They'll figure it out on their own and then they'll be asking questions like, "I saw that article. Why did you delete the last paragraph?"

You are a guy, aren't you?

See results

Are you now more serious about buying your dream?

See results

Comments

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    • Liz Green Berry profile image

      Liz Green Berry 5 years ago from TX

      I've thought about a lot of different comments to make about this: snide, constructive, realistic. I think I shall just resolve to write the rebuttal hub "Why You Should Crush Your Signifigant Other's Dreams of Owning a Classic Car."

    • DougBerry profile image
      Author

      DougBerry 5 years ago from Abilene, TX

      Hmm. Maybe the reason I haven't seen my car in months is that Liz told the body shop to sell it.

    • alocsin profile image

      alocsin 5 years ago from Orange County, CA

      For me, the main problem is money. Cars from the 1930s are really expensive, if they can be found. Voting this Up and Interesting.

    • DougBerry profile image
      Author

      DougBerry 5 years ago from Abilene, TX

      Cars from the 1930s are extremely easy to hot-wire. I'm not saying you should do this. Especially since driving down the road in a 1932 Pierce-Arrow might be a bit obvious.

      Depending on your skill level, kits to make a newer car look old are available or you can do a body-off, ground-up restoration on a heap.

    • profile image

      Sunnie Day 5 years ago

      Hello Doug,

      I am still hoping one day I will own my dream car! I came very close to getting one last year..Just thought I would share this link so you can see I am very serious..lol

      Glad you got your dream car! You only live once.

      Sunnie

      http://sunnieday.hubpages.com/hub/My-Dream-Car-is-...

    • profile image

      Jools 5 years ago

      I did it! I haven't told my family,but my friends know that I just bought a 1991 Alfa Romeo Spider Veloce! He's red, and beautifully kept, with 23k original miles. It;s been only a week but I could'nt be more pleased :-)

    • sweetguide profile image

      sweetguide 5 years ago from River side

      Thank you very very much for sharing such a Great Information dear DougBerry

    • Civil War Bob profile image

      Civil War Bob 5 years ago from Glenside, Pennsylvania

      I love talking old cars; especially when the '64 Corvair is the topic...my first ride. Good Hub...like baby moons on a '64!

    • RetailRich profile image

      RetailRich 5 years ago

      You've made me think about this more seriously. Good article!

    • profile image

      jamer891 5 years ago from Sunnyvale, CA

      It all depends on the type car your buying.

      For example an Avanti.

    • dkm27 profile image

      dkm27 5 years ago from Chicago

      My husband has a Corvette that sits in the garage all winter. Before that, it was the Fiat Spider and a Porsche. I don't get the fascination, but he doesn't understand why I need over 50 pairs of shoes. Guys and cars, girls and shoes..it works.

    • DougBerry profile image
      Author

      DougBerry 5 years ago from Abilene, TX

      My dad had a Fiat Spider when I was a kid. It's claim to fame was that you could drive it in one door of the two-car garage and out the other. The down-side is that even the dealer in Seattle couldn't keep that piece of junk running.

      We got a '59 Corvette shortly thereafter. If your husband is following my father's path, you're about due for a 55 T-bird.

    • profile image

      Abel 4 years ago

      My dream car is also a 64 impala. But from what I hear, classics are very expensive just to maintain on a daily basis. Also that they shouldn't be a "daily driver" type of car because of these expenses (if u can't keep up with em)

    • DougBerry profile image
      Author

      DougBerry 4 years ago from Abilene, TX

      When I owned an arcade, I was forced to become a jack-leg electronics repair guy. Having owned a '64 Impala SS when I was a teenager forced me to become a mechanic.

      The beauty of working on these is that there isn't a whole lot you can't do with them in your garage with common tools. If you do take it in to get it worked on, the folks working on them generally like to work on them.

      The caveat to other people working on them is this: if the car has been put together from the broken pieces of 1,000 other cars, the mechanic will hate you and not want to work on it. If you have one that's had a pretty sheltered life and been well maintained (or at least not butchered), you'll probably find someone who loves to work on your car.

      Which isn't often. In the last year I rebuilt the carburetor. If I'd paid someone to do it, that's probably $100 job is my guess. Depends on where you are, of course.

    • hiwinder profile image

      hiwinder 4 years ago from Western North Carolina

      As a car-guy, I eat, sleep, dream and write about cars. Two of my dream cars are in my garage right now. I wish I had more money and a bigger garage, because there are so many collectible cars out there that I want. Thanks for the interesting article.

    Click to Rate This Article