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Five Car-Emblem Meanings That Might Surprise You

Updated on July 15, 2016

Some emblems, or logos, have remained true to form over the decades while others have dramatically evolved. Some auto emblems are incredibly simple while others are much more ornate. Here, we will cover five car emblems that have meanings behind them that just might surprise you!

The Mazda Emblem

The Mazda emblem has changed significantly since 1934 where the stand-alone letters, MAZDA, were all the emblem entailed. In ancient Asian civilizations, Ahura Mazda was the name of a god that represented wisdom, intelligence and harmony. Very interestingly, Mazda's founder's last name is eerily similar to the 'Mazda' spelling of the Asian god – the founder's name is Jujiro Matsuda. The current wings that represent the Mazda emblem today have been around since 1998; and that design is the 5th change in the car's logo since 1934. The wings (in-flight) symbolize Mazda's flight into the 21st Century.

The Toyota Emblem

The emblem for Toyota incorporates three ovals which touch/intersect one another at all times. The concept of 'touching', here, translates into 'connecting'; and in this case, it represents Toyota connecting with its customers. The three connecting ovals, also, appear to be ecliptic which is meant to depict the heart of the customers, the heart of the automobiles, and the limitless opportunities and technological potential that are waiting in the wings to be unveiled and utilized by the Toyota enterprise.

The Rolls Royce Emblem

The Rolls Royce logo is one of the few emblems without covert symbolism in that the two 'R's, quite simply, stand for 'Rolls Royce', and nothing more. However, to make up for this simplistic display, one will also find the form of a woman leaning forward, on the hood, just above the 'RR' emblem. The graceful woman has covered, outstretched arms that could be mistaken for wings. Apparently, this 'Flying Lady' represents a woman who was part of an illicit love-affair involving an automobile mogul, John Walter, who was editor of The Car Illustrated magazine at the turn of the 20th Century.

The Subaru Emblem

Subaru is the auto-manufacturing division of the Japanese transportation conglomerate, Fuji Heavy Industries (FHI), which is the parent company. The Subaru emblem has six polished stars that are 'not of this world' you could say. They reference Pleiades which is a grouping of stars within the well-known constellation of Taurus. The Japanese translation for 'Taurus' is 'Subaru'. Interestingly, these six stars – the physical ones in space – have been used for thousands of years within the Japanese culture to help sea-travelers reach their land destinations.

Five car companies united to form FHI (the largest of the six stars) and this occurrence correlates itself with the Pleiades constellation which is a unification of stars. Fuji Heavy Industries, therefore, offers a parallel view of being a 'constellation' of companies that became united into one.

The BMW Emblem

Interestingly, before BMW was associated with high-class automobiles, the BMW name was associated as an airplane manufacturer. The planes were noted for their blue and white coloring which were, and still are, the Bavarian state colors. This gave rise to the blue and white on the car's classic emblems. If one uses one's imagination, you can look at the BMW emblem with its four blue-and-white sections in the middle and 'see' white propellers whirling against a blue sky – that visualization is intentional in remembrance of the iconic planes that had their hey-day of the BMW company during the very early part of the 1900's.

Having a bit of insight regarding automobile emblems adds a dimension of appreciation for car manufacturers whose histories are quite a bit more intriguing than most would imagine.

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