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How To Repair Or Replace A Dodge Durango or Ram Truck Power Steering Pump

Updated on January 29, 2013
Randy Godwin profile image

Randy has years of experience dealing with all sorts of hydraulic repairs around the farm and on many types of industrial equipment.

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Dodge Durango Power Steering Pump Replacement

Replacing a power steering pump in your Dodge Durango or other Dodge vehicle with a 318 cubic inch engine (5.2 liter) doesn’t have to be a costly or difficult job. This article will take you step-by step through the process of replacing your Durango or other Dodge powered vehicle power steering pump.

The tool requirements for replacing the steering pump are common metric tools for the most part. The use of a pulley remover is mandatory because of the method used to attach the pulley to the Durango power steering pump itself.

As always, remove the battery connections to ensure the engine is not started accidentally while replacing the power steering pump. Take your time and you should have no problems with this project. A leaky or malfunctioning power steering pump can be dangerous if not repaired or replaced when discovered to be bad.

2000 Dodge Durango Steering Pump

Dodge 318 cu inch or 5.2 liter engine
Dodge 318 cu inch or 5.2 liter engine
Dodge power steering pump
Dodge power steering pump
Disconnect the hydraulic lines
Disconnect the hydraulic lines
Remove the bolts from the pump bracket
Remove the bolts from the pump bracket

Beginning the steering pump replacement process

Start out by removing the serpentine belt by putting pressure on the spring retainer until the belt can be safely removed. Detach the positive battery clamp from the terminal for safety’s sake.

Note the way the serpentine belt is placed around the particular pulleys if there is no diagram on the engine itself.

The steering pump is attached to an engine retaining bracket. The bracket must first be removed from the engine before the power steering pump itself can be accessed.

First, remove the two pressure and return hydraulic lines from the steering pump by compressing the retaining clamps. A small amount of steering fluid may be caught in a container with the balance to be emptied from the reservoir later.

The bracket uses 4 bolts to attach it to the engine. Remove these bolts and note which one goes where in the bracket.

We removed the radiator hose from the radiator in order to have more working room and to allow easier removal and replacement of the Dodge power steering pump.This also makes removing and replacing the steel hydraulic lines easier.

Edelmann 7857 Power Steering Gear Box Complete Rebuild Kit
Edelmann 7857 Power Steering Gear Box Complete Rebuild Kit

Rebuild kits for many different models and types of Dodge power steering pumps.

 

Replacing Steering pump and Pulley

Old pump still on bracket
Old pump still on bracket
Rear of old dodge power steering pump with line fitting removed
Rear of old dodge power steering pump with line fitting removed
We used a 3 prong pulley remover but the special tool is better
We used a 3 prong pulley remover but the special tool is better

Pump Pulley Removal and Replacement

With the bracket bolts removed, it should be easy to pull the old power steering pump from the engine compartment. Remove the cap containing the dipstick from the reservoir and place it aside. Many new or aftermarket rebuilt power steering pumps do not include a new reservoir check cap with the purchase. The old power steering pump will be returned for the deposit and will be rebuilt if it isn’t damaged beyond repair.

At this point you may finish emptying the remaining power steering fluid from the reservoir into a closed container. Always refill the new power steering pump with new fluid. A malfunctioning steering pump may have introduced metal particles into the fluid itself and may damage the new power steering pump if reused.

Place the assembly on a stable working surface while removing and replacing the pulley and steering pump from the engine retaining bracket. While we used a standard 3 prong pulley remover, it is suggested you rent a tool made just for this purpose. The 3 prong puller, if not used carefully, may cause the pulley to be warped. Both AutoZone and O’Reilly auto parts stores will let you use a special tool for a deposit which will be returned after use.

Power Steering Pump Pulley Removers

OTC 7185 Power Steering Pump Pulley
OTC 7185 Power Steering Pump Pulley

For easy removal of power steering pump pulleys

 

Replacing and bleeding the steering pump


Once the pulley is removed you can now access the 2 bolts which hold the steering pump to the engine retaining bracket. You may need to use the old hydraulic line fittings from the old pump if new fittings are not supplied with the new steering pump. New fittings are inexpensive if you want to be sure of having no leaks, The choice is yours.

With the fittings replaced, you may now reverse the order of the removal process including using the special tool to press the pulley onto the new pump. Once the power steering pump is back in place and the lines reattached it is time to refill the reservoir with new power steering fluid. Replace the serpentine belt and start the engine.

Bleed the system by turning the steering wheel slowly from side to side without putting pressure against the stops. Turn off engine and top up the fluid until it remains in the safe area and the steering is smooth. Check for leaks and the job is done! Return the special pulley tool and get your deposit back for it and the old power steering pump.

This project should only cost you about $75 depending on where you get the new power steering pump. Good luck on your repairs and thanks for reading my articles!

Comments

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    • Randy Godwin profile imageAUTHOR

      Randy Godwin 

      3 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Eugenia--Autozone loaned me the tool to remove the old pulley for a small fee. Check with them or another parts supply store for use of the tool. Good luck! :)

      Randy

    • profile image

      Eugenia 

      3 years ago

      What if replacement pump still has the pulley on it. Do u still have to have the special tool to take the current off before removing

    • Randy Godwin profile imageAUTHOR

      Randy Godwin 

      7 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Glad the article helped keep your spouse's head intact, Debbie! Thanks for reading and commenting!

      Randy

    • profile image

      Debbie - in Myakka, FL 

      7 years ago

      Thank you for your MOST HELPFUL information regarding the replacement of the power steering pump for our Dodge Durango - It was a GREAT HELP!! Thanks again for stopping my husband's head from exploding!!

    • Randy Godwin profile imageAUTHOR

      Randy Godwin 

      7 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Thanks Hardlymoving!

      Randy

    • hardlymoving profile image

      hardlymoving 

      7 years ago from Memphis, TN

      Good job!

    • Randy Godwin profile imageAUTHOR

      Randy Godwin 

      8 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Always great to have the approval of an expert, Earnest! Surprising how few people are afraid to try these simple fixes, though! Thanks for stopping by!

      P.S. Want to sell that dog?

      Randy

    • earnestshub profile image

      earnestshub 

      8 years ago from Melbourne Australia

      Nice work Randy, I could train my dog to do it after your excellent description. I have seen ridiculous quotes for this simple job.

      I just did a water pump on my Nissan ute. It was a breeze to do.

    • Randy Godwin profile imageAUTHOR

      Randy Godwin 

      8 years ago from Southern Georgia

      I really appreciate your time, Prasetio! Thanks!

    • prasetio30 profile image

      prasetio30 

      8 years ago from malang-indonesia

      another great hub. I never know about machine before. I learn much from you. Thanks for share with us.

      Prasetio

    • Randy Godwin profile imageAUTHOR

      Randy Godwin 

      8 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Compared to what I'm usually repairing this was a piece of cake, Steve! I'm normally working on huge tractors and combines using large tools which tire me out just holding them. Thanks for taking the time to read and comment!

      Randy

    • Randy Godwin profile imageAUTHOR

      Randy Godwin 

      8 years ago from Southern Georgia

      LOL! I will slowly get you over your fear of snakes, AK! I know how hard it is for you to view my hubs and I really appreciate your taking the time. I will try to return the favor!

      Randy

    • SteveoMc profile image

      SteveoMc 

      8 years ago from Pacific NorthWest

      It sure looks a lot harder than you make it sound....I doubt if I would tackle the problem myself. Thanks for a good step by step process.

    • akirchner profile image

      Audrey Kirchner 

      8 years ago from Washington

      Well, if I ever need to do some hydraulic repair on a Dodge Durango, I know where to come! I even managed to not look at the avatar all the way down the page!

    • Randy Godwin profile imageAUTHOR

      Randy Godwin 

      8 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Yep, Beth loves the free car maintenance she gets from me, HH! That's why I have to try and make a few bucks out of these articles! Wemmings! As Popeye so eloquently puts it! LOL! Thanks!

    • Hello, hello, profile image

      Hello, hello, 

      8 years ago from London, UK

      Now this is a great hub for my son. Beth has the right idea. Well done. hahaha

    • Randy Godwin profile imageAUTHOR

      Randy Godwin 

      8 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Charge is the key word here! Collecting from Beth is the hard part! Thanks for the rate! LOL!

    • habee profile image

      Holle Abee 

      8 years ago from Georgia

      Glad you got Beth's car repaired! How much do you charge? My old car needs some work. Rated up for a thorough article!

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