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How to give your car the VIP Japan Style Look

Updated on July 30, 2013
jaydawg808 profile image

Jaydawg808 writes interesting and innovative articles from a variety of topics and interests.

What is VIP?

What is VIP? First off, VIP stands for "Very Important Person" and is a trend of car style originated from Japan. It's pronounced as "vee eye pee" and not "veep." While natives of Japan simply say "bippu."

What are the characteristics of VIP cars?

VIP cars often will usually have a stanced appearance. This is achieved by using large diameter wheels with a low offset so that it sits flushed with the fender of the car. It is not uncommon to see a VIP car that has crazy and extreme negative camber on the wheels.

A full body kit to give it more of an aerodynamic styling is another characteristic. The key is to appear and look wide. Most VIP cars have a widebody kit or conversion to achieve this look.

Another characteristic of VIP cars is the suspension. The car sits very low, and in most cases, slammed to the ground. This is achieved by coilover suspension or air ride suspension. Air suspension will allow the vehicle to touch the ground and will achieve the lowest drop possible as opposed to coilovers and drop springs (which are inferior).

The interior will have woodgrain as accents. Some will have trays and tables (for food and wine) to further emphasize the VIP and luxurious look.

Lastly, these VIP cars are generally Black, White, or Silver in body color. These colors express class and style. BMW's look the best in Black, while Mercedes Benz looks the best in Silver. The same goes for VIP cars. If it's any other color, then it's not a true VIP car.

Nissan President
Nissan President

What are some VIP car examples?

Most VIP cars are produced by Toyota and Nissan.

They consist of the following:

  • Nissan President
  • Nissan Cima
  • Nissan Cedric
  • Nissan Gloria
  • Nissan Fuga
  • Toyota Celsior
  • Toyota Century
  • Toyota Crown
  • Toyota Aristo

Lexus LS
Lexus LS

What are some American styled VIP car examples?

While the VIP origin is from Japan, there are many enthusiasts in America that are using the following vehicles to mirror the VIP look of Japan:

  • Lexus GS
  • Lexus LS
  • Infiniti Q Series
  • Infiniti M Series

There are also more common vehicles that are more affordable in price where the VIP look is also showing a trend, these include:

  • Honda Accord
  • Toyota Camry
  • Nissan Altima
  • Nissan Maxima
  • Mazda 6

How to give your car the VIP look

1. The first thing to do is to find a car that is VIP worthy. A VIP car is usually a sedan (4-doors) and is usually Japanese. Stick with Lexus and Infiniti as the main brands to achieve the VIP look as close as possible. You can, however, achieve the VIP look with other vehicles such as the Honda Accord, Toyota Camry, Nissan Altima, Nissan Maxima, or the Mazda 6. Anything else will not do. You have to remember that a VIP car needs to be a larger sedan to be authentic.

2. Be sure the color is correct. As mentioned in the beginning, the color should be Silver, White, or Black. If the car is not this color, invest in painting it one of those colors.

3. Change to a coilover or full air ride suspension. The only way the car is going to be lower is via those two methods. As explained earlier, drop springs are inferior and will not get you low. Coilover suspension is more affordable, but does not offer the benefits of riding on air adjustable suspension. Air will allow you to go lower, adjust the height at the push of a button, and arguably has a better ride. The only drawback to air is the higher cost.

4. Install wide, low offset, large wheels. This is a must to achieve the VIP look. Wheel size should be above 18" in diameter. Anything smaller would not achieve this look. Wheels should tuck under the fender wells of the car. And this feat is only achieved via coilover and air suspension. More so with air suspension. Generally, to tuck the rear tire, negative camber is used. This means when viewing the car from the rear, the rear tires angle out and the bottom, but tuck in at the top of the wheel well. Depending on the angle, the tire would still fit flush on the pavement, but in some cases it won't. This leads to premature tire wear. And many people with this look go though many tires.

5. Give the car a wider look via body kits. There are many aftermarket aero kit manufacturers that will allow you to affix them on to the car to give the appearance of a wider car. The VIP look is achieved though this widen and low stance.

6. Interior styling. Being in the VIP scene, there are a few key elements that your vehicle must have to be considered VIP.

First, you must have curtains on the windows. Some only have curtains in the rear, but true VIP cars have curtains on the front and rear windows.

Next, wood accented panels are also a norm. If there's no wood grain, it's not a true VIP car.

Ever seen green tinted windows? Green tint is a true VIP staple on cars. Very rare to come by, and often hard to duplicate.

Next, a fusa is needed. They look like graduation tassles hanging from a pretzel knot. Almost every single VIP car has this diplayed and dangling from the rear view mirror. They come in different sizes and colors. You're not true VIP without it!

High end sound system. This is a must. They don't call these cars VIP and high end for nothing. You'll want to outfit the car with an assortment of video screens capable of playing DVD video. You'll also want to have a high end audio system that doesn't just emphasize bass like the rest you see. You want a system that is audiophile quality.

© 2013 jaydawg808

Comments

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    • kschang profile image

      kschang 

      4 years ago from San Francisco, CA, USA

      So it's basically a "low-rider" big saloon / sedan?

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