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Grandpa Go Fast's 1970 Ford F100

Updated on February 9, 2014

Rebuilding a 1970 Ford F100

Over the past few years the Mad Scientist and I have went ahead to repair the body and swap the engine in my 1984 Mercury Capri. In the same time we were able to completely gut and rebuild a 1970 Ford Maverick into a tire melting street machine. During the time we spent working on cars for ourselves we went ahead and told everybody that we came into contact with to keep their ears on the ground for the next deal they thought we might be interested in. Conveniently, over the holidays we were informed that an old family friend happened to have an old truck they were looking to get rid of. At the time we were not necessarily looking to get ourselves into another project, but the holidays where coming and we had a particular person in mind. That's right; my Grandpa Go Fast was the person in mind.

For years he spent his time doing nothing but going to work and coming home. He collects models of classic cars and trucks. In his garage he has framed pictures on the walls of all the classics he wish he had, but can't afford. Unfortunately, the Mad Scientist and I don't have the finances to get one of the cars on his walls for ourselves let alone for him. However, we were presented with an opportunity that we thought he might like.

After speaking with this long-time family friend we were able to acquire the 1970 Ford F100 under the condition we drove back to house we bought it at to show it off when we were done. We thought that although it was a condition it was the least we could do, and we like showing off anyway!

Everyone car owner needs a Repair Manual - A Book for every Ride

Although the Mad Scientist and I don't necessarily need a manual, we though it might be a good idea to make one accessible to anyone that might like one. So if your in need of a manual for your 1965-81 Ford F100 Pickup truck, look no further. Whether you are a professional mechanic or someone that might be in over your head, this is the manual for you.

GrandpaGoFastF100 Frame
GrandpaGoFastF100 Frame

Tearing Down the F100

When we brought the 1970 F100 home, the first thing we did was begin tearing it apart. Even before rolling the truck off the trailer we began grinding the rusted bolts in the bed. When the truck finally came of the trailer we began taking everything off. We took the bed and rolled it upside down on another mini trailer. We yanked out the interior(seats and anything else that was piled up inside). We rolled the truck backwards into the garage and took off the doors.

A week later we pulled the fuel tank and rolled the cab of the truck up vertically so that we could work on the bottom without being upside down. We cut out the bad and welded in new metal. While fixing the cab we also put a little effort into cleaning up the frame, axle, and rear brake drums. We were unsure of the color the completed truck would be painted in, but we ended up deciding that we should paint the frame a nice blue.

Deciding What the F100 Should Look Like - Picking a Color

GrandpaGoFastF100 color ideas
GrandpaGoFastF100 color ideas

What should Grandpa Go Fast's Truck look like?

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F100 preformed cab mounts
F100 preformed cab mounts

Rebuilding the Cab

Buying Body Parts

When we rolled the cab up to work on the bottom, we realized that piecing everything together would be a bit of an difficult task. So instead of scabbing everything together, we decided to simply go online and make a purchase that would likely reduce the work. We took a trip down to LMCTruck.com and searched for the Truck and bought some preformed cab mounts. They went in quite well and completely covered most of the floor rust damage.

Rebuilding the bottom of the F100 Truck Cab - Fixing the truck from the bottom up

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The beginning of the truck. Clearly you can see that the cab mounts have been completely rusted out.The cross member was rebuilt and all sections of the cab undercoated and rubberized to protect the cab from future rust problems.The new cab mounts were ordered from LMC Truck and mocked on the cab to determine how they would look when installed.
The beginning of the truck. Clearly you can see that the cab mounts have been completely rusted out.
The beginning of the truck. Clearly you can see that the cab mounts have been completely rusted out.
The cross member was rebuilt and all sections of the cab undercoated and rubberized to protect the cab from future rust problems.
The cross member was rebuilt and all sections of the cab undercoated and rubberized to protect the cab from future rust problems.
The new cab mounts were ordered from LMC Truck and mocked on the cab to determine how they would look when installed.
The new cab mounts were ordered from LMC Truck and mocked on the cab to determine how they would look when installed.
Ford360
Ford360

Issues with the Stock Engine

The Big Block 360 doesn't make the cut

One of the biggest elements of the truck that spiked enthusiasm was the fact that it came with a Big Block 360 and Ford 9"

axle. The Mad Scientist and I took some time to tear the heads off the engine. Unfortunately, we came to find out that the cylinder walls had a little too much damage. The damage was great enough to make the engine for this build un-useable. However, the engine was not so destroyed that it could not be sent to a machine shop and fixed for a future build.

Grandpa GoFast's 1970 Ford 302 - Rebuilding the Ford 302 small block

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The 1970 Ford 302 needed a heavy bath in degreaser in order to clean the engine up enough before we could find the bolts needed to tear it down.We finally became able to tear off the carb, intake, valve covers, and brackets.Tearing off the heads revealed that the 1970 302 came fully equip with closed-chamber cast iron heads.Pulling off the timing cover revealed that the timing chain & gear needed replacing. Conveniently we had a spare kit on the shelf!The engine still needs a little work, but still looks good in chrome and Ford blue.
The 1970 Ford 302 needed a heavy bath in degreaser in order to clean the engine up enough before we could find the bolts needed to tear it down.
The 1970 Ford 302 needed a heavy bath in degreaser in order to clean the engine up enough before we could find the bolts needed to tear it down.
We finally became able to tear off the carb, intake, valve covers, and brackets.
We finally became able to tear off the carb, intake, valve covers, and brackets.
Tearing off the heads revealed that the 1970 302 came fully equip with closed-chamber cast iron heads.
Tearing off the heads revealed that the 1970 302 came fully equip with closed-chamber cast iron heads.
Pulling off the timing cover revealed that the timing chain & gear needed replacing. Conveniently we had a spare kit on the shelf!
Pulling off the timing cover revealed that the timing chain & gear needed replacing. Conveniently we had a spare kit on the shelf!
The engine still needs a little work, but still looks good in chrome and Ford blue.
The engine still needs a little work, but still looks good in chrome and Ford blue.
Grandpa GoFast's 1970 Ford 302
Grandpa GoFast's 1970 Ford 302

Grandpa GoFast's Ford 302

Rebuilding the 1970 Ford 302

During the course of other project builds we were able to come across a few other V8 engines. More specifically, we were able to acquire a 1970 Ford 302 that came out of a Ford Falcon. During the process of building the '84 Capri and '70 Maverick we paced the extra engine and parts on the shelf for the next build. Little did we know that the next build would come sooner rather than later. Almost immediately after finishing up the Maverick we found ourselves pulling the '70 Ford 302 block off the shelf and placing it on the engine stand. After purchasing a universal gasket kit, the Mad Scientist and I spent a few hours cleaning, tearing down, and rebuilding the engine. As with all other Ford engines we have built, Grandpa GoFast's Ford 302 was also painted in Ford Blue. Conveniently, the 1970 302 came with a little more chrome than the other engines that were built. This difference seems to really set the engine off from the rest.

Until recently, Grandpa Go Fast has never had a modern classic to call his own. So now that his kids and grand kids are chipping in to rebuild one for him, he would like to know what everyone thinks.

So feel free to tell Grandpa Go Fast what you think of his truck.

Be sure to bookmark this page to keep up with the rebuild of this 1970 Ford F100.

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