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Who Are The People That Text And Drive

Updated on August 23, 2016

National Youth Risk Behavior Survey taken in 2011 reports that teens text and drive because they feel "invincible". Of the millions of teen, 45% text or will text within a 30 day period. These teens, assert the survey, are more than likely to not use their seat belts as well as drive while intoxicated. Teenagers, however, are not the only culprit of texting while driving.

Who Is A Distracted Driver?

A vehicle can easily become a deadly weapon, most of the time death will come in the form of an accident. As reported by the U.S. Department of Transportation in 2009 - 5,500 death and 450,000 injuries accord that year. These deaths and injuries, the report declares, result from what they term "distracted driver". Distracted drivers fall into all and any categories that compete for the drivers attention. If and when a driver eats or drinks; she puts on makeup or comb her hair; when the driver uses a directive device or watch a movie; when a driver changes the radio channel or flips through the MP3 player. They are all distractive drivers. With little discrimination the report asserts that any person who loses focus when driving fits into the distracted driver category. Researchers understanding the complexity of driving, realize the distractions common to drivers, and therefore highlight the weaknesses of all drivers to stress the importance of having them work toward minimizing distracted driving.

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Below is a list of preventive acts as per researchers to prevent distracted driving:

  • Place turned off electronic devices aside, in glove compartment or purse
  • When driving keep cell phone on silence mode.
  • Do not drink or eat whiling driving.
  • Apply makeup when at home, in the parking lot or on the job not while driving.
  • Secure pet in traveling container before pulling off.
  • Ensure you child has all needed items before getting on the road.
  • If you must do anything for the child pull into a parking lot and make the necessary adjustments.
  • Input address into GPS before driving off.

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The Biggest Distractor

Teenagers have the reputation of being distracted drivers; they are known to text while driving. Often they drive as they read texts from friends. Texting when driving is the most dangers because it demands hand-eye coordination. Researchers observed that the length of time to it takes the teen to text while driving is equivalent to a drive across the football field. To combat the high number of death in traffic accidents among teenage experts recommend the removal of the electronic devices when driving and the prohibition of passengers when teenagers sit behind the wheel.

In an attempt to decrease the number of crashes experts suggest making available to the public "key facts and statistics". There are 14 facts and statistics they feel the public should know.

1. The number of deaths due to distracted drivers in 2014 were 3,179. That same year 431,000 motorist and passengers were injured.

2. In the U.S. and its Territories 169.3 billion texts were sent when driving.

3. Distractions were responsible for the death of 10% of drivers between the ages 15 -19. The number is highest among all other age groups.

4. Twenty-year-old drivers have a 23% chance of dying from crashes due to distracted driving.

5. Drivers handling technological devices went up to 2.2% in 2014.

6. In America over 660,000 drivers are either on the phone or texting.

7. A survey completed by an insurance company declared that distracted drivers are guilty of doing an assortment of behind the wheel maneuvers. Many of the drivers surveyed admitted to texting while driving as well as observe others do the same.

8. The average eyes off the road text time is 5 seconds.

9. After 2011, the amount of users of smartphone increased by 80%.

10. Cell phone use by adult increased by 53%

11. Forty-six states banned texting while driving.

12. Fourteen states banned the use of cell phones when driving.

13. Thirty-eight states banned any use of devices when driving.

14. Some states that ban the use of the cell phone or texting while driving categorized this ban as a "primary law". Which means that drivers can be ticketed for the act without any traffic violation.

A Campaign

U.S. Department of Transportation in keeping the public informed has put together various advertisements that target motorist, railroad drivers, pilot and commercial drivers. The campaign against distracted drivers starts at the head as President Obama in 2009 instructed all of his employees not to "text and drive". This also includes, directs the President, any form of distracted driving. Hence, federal employees and contractors most not use any electronic devices when driving. They most not allow anything to take their focus off the road.

To continue the enhancement of public awareness the U.S. Department of Transportation drafted some catch phrases that were featured in numerous billboards . Below are a few of these phrases.

"One Text or Call Could Wreck It All"

"Texting and Driving. Makes Good People Look Bad"

"Stop the Texts. Stop the Wrecks"

How many times have you text and drive?

See results
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More Campaigns

Meg DeAngelis created a YouTube video titled "10 Everyday Things You're Doing Wrong" on texting and driving. This short video talks about driving safety that comes from only staying focused on the road. Organizations such as Mazda Motorsports, National Organizations for Youth Safety, NHTSA, and the Ad Council sponsor yearly a video competition called Project Yellow Light. This contest targets teens and their creative abilities by asking them to put together videos on the hazards of distracted driving. Some car dealership employees publicly pledge not to text when driving. Better Business Bureau created a brochure, titled "Faces of Distracted Driving", that directs employers on how to encourage their workers to avoid distracted driving. The list of companies, agencies, and non-profit organizations campaigning against texting and driving extends beyond this article and without a doubt indicate the level of concern about the potential fatality due to distractive driving.

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CC by Flickr | Source

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