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HR Competencies and Hiring Decisions

Updated on October 24, 2016

After completing the module readings, think about what you have read, and pull upon any HR experience you may have. Then, in your own words, write one or two paragraphs explaining the competencies needed by HR professionals and why HR certification is important. Title your post 1-2 Competencies needed by HR Professionals.

1-2 Competencies needed by HR Professionals

Human resources professionals need to possess certain competencies in order to function within their position. There are three main core competencies needed by human resources professionals, they are: productivity, customer service/quality, and organizational culture. In addition to the three core competencies there are also competencies in other areas that all human resources professionals need to have in order to be considered competent. These competencies are: strategic knowledge, strategic impact knowledge, legal capabilities, administrative capabilities, operational capabilities, technology knowledge, and technology usage abilities. While all human resources professionals need the same competencies, there are certain positions where some competencies are more important than others. For instance, a human resources professional in charge of hiring would value competencies in strategic knowledge, legal capabilities, administrative capabilities, technology usage, productivity, customer service/quality, and organizational culture.

Human resources certification is important for numerous reasons; the level of importance is based on the employer, the employee, and the job description. Human resources certification allows an employer to automatically know that a potential employee is competent in the required competencies and that they possess all the knowledge needed for the position. Many businesses promote and hire based on a human resource professional’s level of certification. Having human resources certification can be valuable to employees as it can give the employee an increased chance of be hired and becoming promoted. Some human resources jobs require certification while others do not; this tends to be based on the level of the position, the pay grade, and the organization culture.

References

Mathis, R. L., Jackson, J. H., & Valentine, S. (2014). Human resource management (14th ed.). Singapore:

Cengage Learning Editores.

If your employer asked you to review the decision not to hire an African American applicant for a job, what would you need to consider?

If my employer asked me to review the decision not to hire an African American applicant for a job, I would need to look at the African American applicant as well as all of the other applicants for the position. I would first consider the protected characteristics in order to ensure that the decision to not hire the applicant was not in any form based on the applicant’s age, color, disability, genetic information, martial status, military status, national origins, pregnancy, race, religion, or sexual orientation (Mathis, Jackson, & Valentine, 2014, p.72).

I would begin the process by comparing the applicant to all the other applicants to see if the applicant’s skill set and educational level made the applicant less qualified for the position. If there were applicants that appeared to be a better fit based on skill and education, then I would tell my employer that the decision seemed fair. However, if the applicant had all the same skills and educational level of the other applicants, then I would check the application for any notes on why the applicant was not hired. Acceptable reasons could be personality conflict, lack of punctuality, or another applicant being extremely qualified. If the notes did not yield an acceptable reason then I would next speak with the person who interviewed the applicant to discover what made them decide not to hire the applicant or why a different applicant was more suitable for the position. I would report to my employer and tell him or her whether the decision was fair or not based on the answers provided by the person who interviewed the applicant.

References

Mathis, R. L., Jackson, J. H., & Valentine, S. (2014). Human resource management (14th ed.). Singapore:

Cengage Learning Editores.

Why is it important for HR management to transform from being primarily administrative and operational to becoming a more strategic contributor?

There are numerous reasons why it is important for human resources management to transform from being primarily administrative and operational to becoming a more strategic contributor. When human resources management limits itself to acting only in an administrative and operational manner, then the organization or company is underutilizing an entire department of employees. The human resources management needs to play a strategic role in business because the recruitment, hiring, and retention of good employees and candidates has become very competitive. Through evolving to be able to act in an administrative, operational, and strategic capacity, the human resources management will have a hiring and retention advantage over other businesses whose human resources management department only acts as an administrative and operational contributor.

A human resources department that is able to be a strategic contributor also increases the value of their human capital. Human capital is “the collective value of the capabilities, knowledge, skills, life experiences, and motivation of an organizational workforce” (Mathis, Jackson, & Valentine, 2014, p.6). A human resources management department who is able to contribute to a business in a strategic manner would have employees with a more diverse range of skills set, and in turn, be able to hire employees who would have a higher range of educations and skills. This would lead to a business having more human capital than their competitors.

References

Mathis, R. L., Jackson, J. H., & Valentine, S. (2014). Human resource management (14th ed.). Singapore:

Cengage Learning Editores.

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