ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel

How to Get a Teaching Job in Education: Tips for College and the Job Search Process

Updated on September 2, 2016
randomcreative profile image

Rose is a full-time freelance writer who frequently writes about education, special education, DIY projects, food, Milwaukee, and more.

Source

I have applied for teaching licenses in 4 states and have completed extensive job searches for teaching jobs in two of those states. During my first search, I applied for over 100 teaching positions, had approximately 7 interviews, and ended up landing a teacher aide position two weeks before the school year started. During my second search, after sending out over 30 applications, I was fortunate enough to get hired in early July...but it was for a position that I wasn't actually qualified to teach, which meant that I had to start taking classes immediately.

Needless to say, I fully understand the frustration that many beginning teachers go through when they start their first job searches. No one wants to hire you when you don't have any teaching experience, but how are you supposed to get teaching experience when you can't get a job?

I wish that I had some easy answers to this paradox. Unfortunately, I don't. But I do have some tips that are applicable when you are applying to or in a teaching program as well as when you are completing your first job search and interview process. This tips will hopefully make you a little more successful with landing a desirable job. Whatever teaching position you are pursuing, I wish you the best of luck.

This article is primarily aimed at young college students who are getting their first post-high school degrees and do not have a lot of work experience. However, many of these tips will apply to anyone who is looking for their first teaching job.

Job Interview Tips Including Questions and Answers

Unless you can get a significant scholarship from a private university, it will not be worth it with the salary that you'll make teaching.
Unless you can get a significant scholarship from a private university, it will not be worth it with the salary that you'll make teaching. | Source

Public vs. Private School Options

Consider public school options unless you can get a great scholarship or have someone funding your education. Private education is not worth the loans for the salary that you'll be making as a grade school teacher. Your class sizes might not be as small at a public school as they would at a private school, but you will still have some smaller ones. Otherwise the education programs will be very comparable.

Universities with Great Teaching Programs

A
Ball State University:
1299 N McKinley Ave, Ball State University, Muncie, IN 47304, USA

get directions

B
University of Wisconsin-Whitewater:
800 W Main St, University of Wisconsin - Whitewater Campus, Whitewater, WI 53190, USA

get directions

C
Northern Illinois University:
231 N Annie Glidden Rd, DeKalb, IL 60115, USA

get directions

Having multiple teaching certifications will make you more marketable.

Get at least two certifications. For example, if you're primarily interested in pursuing elementary education, consider going for special education, too, or a reading endorsement. Even if all of your certifications don't carry from state to state, having some credits will make it easier to obtain them again. If you do transfer states, at least one certification should carry over.

For middle and high school teachers, consider getting certified in two different subject areas. If you can get a job teaching multiple subjects to start, you may be able to move into a position solely teaching the more desired subject later on.

Do your research.

If possible, research the state or area of the country that you're interested in working after college. I know that this is not always possible, especially if you are relying on someone else,. For example, you may be waiting for a fiancé or spouse to also get a job or to get accepted into a higher education program. You can still research national trends and shortages. For example, there are almost always shortages of special education teachers as well as middle school and high school math and science teachers.

My experience teaching preschool summer camp throughout college was an asset for my initial teaching job interviews.
My experience teaching preschool summer camp throughout college was an asset for my initial teaching job interviews. | Source

The more job experience you can get, the better.

Take advantage of outside opportunities for teaching and/or working with kids. These options can include, but are not limited to, summer camps and classes, babysitting, being a nanny, tutoring, and/or coaching. Being a babysitter or nanny may seem like a step down if you did this work in high school. However, you will be surprised at the significant raise that you will get as a college student with some education classes behind you.

Outside work opportunities are a great method for building your resume and getting recommendation letters for job interviews. Without contracted teaching experience, you will need everything that you can get, especially work that is related to your field.

I used my teaching portfolios for almost all of my initial teaching job interviews.
I used my teaching portfolios for almost all of my initial teaching job interviews. | Source

A teaching portfolio can be a great asset for job interviews.

Make a great teaching portfolio. If this is a required component of your teaching program, do the best that you can with it. If it isn't required, consider creating your own. It will be a valuable resource, especially for the interviews for your first job.

Tip: Working teachers can be a great asset for job networking, too.

Take advantage of every opportunity that you have to shadow.

Shadow/talk with teachers in the field to gain real life tips. This is such an important topic to me that I wrote a separate article about it. My biggest complaint about all of my teaching courses is that they did not provide enough real life teaching skills. Working teachers may be able to provide insight on any of the following skills and more: keeping grade books, parent-teacher conferences, crisis management, co-worker relationships, and working with administration.

Be honest about what is most important to you during your job search.

Prioritize when job searching. Consider what your biggest priority is when you are looking for your first job and put that above all other factors. Here are a few priorities to consider.
Location: Research all of the schools in that particular area. Be realistic about how far you want to drive/commute.
District: if you'd really like to get into a certain school or district, get in any way you can at first (i.e. subbing, part time position, teacher aide). Putting in a year or two of hard work there may give you an edge at moving up there when a desired position opens up.
Money: if you need as much income as possible, apply for anything and everything. Consider other part-time options to supplement subbing or aide positions in case you don't get a full time position the first year out of college (i.e. before/after school programs, tutoring, coaching).

High School Science Teacher, Career Video from drkit.org

When I started my undergrad degree, I never imagined that I would end up teaching special education.
When I started my undergrad degree, I never imagined that I would end up teaching special education. | Source

Be open to all a variety of teaching positions.

Keep an open mind. This is applicable during both your teaching program and your job search process. It is important to get experience with a variety of grade levels, subject areas, student populations, etc. in your teaching program. You may be surprised at the aspects of teaching that you do and don't like. During your job search progress, keep in mind that your first job won't necessarily be what you want to do forever. Don't let this stop you from taking it. I've seen the notion of holding out for the ideal grade, school, etc. hold a number of people back or significantly limit their options. You can't afford to do this when you are starting out.

Has the economy had an affect on your job options?

See results

Accept the reality of the tough economy. This is a lousy time to be job hunting in most fields. We don't know for sure if/when that will change. There will be a lot of baby boomers retiring over the next 10 years, which will increase the number of available teaching jobs. More so than ever, take what you can get for now. Hopefully it won't be that way forever.

Comments

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    • randomcreative profile imageAUTHOR

      Rose Clearfield 

      6 years ago from Milwaukee, Wisconsin

      I should have listened to it the first time, too. If you can't add a second certification now, you can always look at getting one at some point in the future. Once you have a degree, typically it isn't too much work to get another certification. Best of luck!

    • Natashalh profile image

      Natasha 

      6 years ago from Hawaii

      I'd heard the double certification tip before...I should have listened the first time! I don't know if it's too late for me to realistically try to add a second certification into my program of study. I should find out because it certainly would make me more marketable! Thanks for the great advice - I'll hopefully be needing it soon.

    • randomcreative profile imageAUTHOR

      Rose Clearfield 

      6 years ago from Milwaukee, Wisconsin

      Thanks, Cyndi! I'm glad that you agree with the advice here. Articles with teacher tips for newbies are always helpful.

    • cclitgirl profile image

      Cynthia Calhoun 

      6 years ago from Western NC

      Great tips! You also gave me a hub idea! Thanks! After leaving teaching, I can offer some tips to some of the newbies out there. I love the way you offered solid advice - the two-certification part is really good and getting as much experience as you can - even if it's not directly in the classroom - is great, too.

    • randomcreative profile imageAUTHOR

      Rose Clearfield 

      6 years ago from Milwaukee, Wisconsin

      Thanks, Kelley! That's great.

    • profile image

      kelleyward 

      6 years ago

      Thanks for the great tips. I'm sharing this with a friend I know who is trying to find a teaching job! Voted up and shared. Take care, Kelley

    • randomcreative profile imageAUTHOR

      Rose Clearfield 

      7 years ago from Milwaukee, Wisconsin

      I'm so glad that this is helpful for you! Best of luck with the completion of your program and your job search.

    • Jared Zane Kessie profile image

      Jared Zane Kessie 

      7 years ago from Richland, Washington

      This is awesome! I have about a year left in my master's in teaching program, so I am glad I read this now to get a jump start on making myself for marketable and start planning for my teaching future.

    • randomcreative profile imageAUTHOR

      Rose Clearfield 

      7 years ago from Milwaukee, Wisconsin

      You're welcome! I think that it's important for college students and those just starting their job searches to see that.

    • Alladream74 profile image

      Victor Mavedzenge 

      7 years ago from Oakland, California

      Good source material for college students. I find the statistics on how many applications you sent out as compared to interviews you got very interesting. Thanks for sharing

    • randomcreative profile imageAUTHOR

      Rose Clearfield 

      7 years ago from Milwaukee, Wisconsin

      Thank you! I really appreciate your encouragement. :)

    • prasetio30 profile image

      prasetio30 

      7 years ago from malang-indonesia

      As a teacher I give big attention to this hub. Thanks for share this valuable information about how to get a teaching jobs. I believe you are a great teacher. I am proud to be your friend here. I give my vote. Well done, my friend. I learn much from you.

      Prasetio

    • randomcreative profile imageAUTHOR

      Rose Clearfield 

      7 years ago from Milwaukee, Wisconsin

      This hub does not apply to anyone who is looking for a higher education teaching job, as you do not need any type of teacher certification for those positions. Those positions have plenty of their own challenges, but this information is simply not relevant.

    • ershruti304 profile image

      ershruti304 

      7 years ago from Shimla

      Hello

      I am working as a teacher from last 1.7 years. The first time I joined teaching profession was quite accidentally. In fact I didn't even apply, God knows from where they got hold of my resume and contacted me, insisting me to join their college as assistant professor for a subject which is a nightmare for most of the MBAs i.e Operational research. I liked the idea of teaching this subject as it was a challenge for me and then never looked back. Presently I am taking up marketing, HR, Operational management as well as general subjects of management.

      In short you theory is not in tune with my experience but yes it can help many who want to enter into teaching profession. Exceptions are always there and I belong to that category.

    working

    This website uses cookies

    As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, hubpages.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

    For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: https://hubpages.com/privacy-policy#gdpr

    Show Details
    Necessary
    HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
    LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
    Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
    AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
    Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
    CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
    Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
    Features
    Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
    Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
    Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
    Marketing
    Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
    Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
    Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
    Statistics
    Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
    ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)