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How to Make a Lawyer Landing Page that Works

Updated on April 11, 2012

They have landed on your webpage, they have come to visit, but you are not getting more cases…What gives?

If you want to bring traffic to your lawyer website, one of the best ways to draw in new leads or clients is to not bring them to your homepage, but bring them to another page – a landing page – that has what is called, “call to action links.”

A good example of a landing page is http://www.clubdivot.com/. This page clearly calls you to action, and thus is the main goal of any landing page.

One fact to keep in mind as to why landing pages work is that web surfers do not have a lot of time to read lots of text on a web page – they want to come in and go – especially when looking for a lawyer. Web surfers looking for a lawyer look at several factors: phone number, address, practice areas, cost, and ratings or reviews. Basically, they want to know how good is this lawyer, how much does this lawyer cost, and how can I reach this lawyer.

Keeping the above paragraph in mind, what can you do as a law firm? How do you build such a landing page and what instructions do you give to end up with a converting law firm web design?

The Layout of a Money-Making Landing Page

Standard amongst many landing page designs are these several items: At the very top left corner should be your brand image and to the very right should be placed what is called breadcrumbs.

For just like the story of Hansel and Gretel, these breadcrumbs should lead your visitors to relevant pages about ratings, rankings, or case wins on one link; contact us could be another link; and practice areas are a good idea too.

A catchy headline should be on the top, and underneath the main headline should be a secondary headline juxtaposed to a relevant, high-quality image or short video.

Below these items is where the most important part of your landing page layout exists: your call to action link, image, or button.

All of the above should be above what is called the fold. Think of the fold as you would the front page of a newspaper. When you read it, you might fold it. Usually you give more importance to whatever is above the fold, and the same fact goes in web design. Whatever a web surfer can see before having to scroll down the webpage, this is what they will spend most of their attention on. Try to keep as much above the fold as possible.

Other factors to keep in mind: you might want to place trust icons such as the BBB or mention the college you obtained your law degree from somewhere above the fold. And then comes the importance of what colors to use in your attorney website design.

In the next blog post, I will talk more about these colors, what call to actions would be helpful, and discuss A/B testing to get the most out of your law firm marketing.

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