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Jobs and Labor in Human Resources Strategy and Development

Updated on January 1, 2017

Case Study: Recruiting at Kia

Case Study: Recruiting at Kia

  1. 1. Describe how employing a large number of new workers require strategic recruiting planning and operational efforts, and discuss what aspects might be different in smaller firms.

Recruiting a large number of new workers requires strategic recruiting, planning, and operational efforts. Kia Motors America showcased these efforts when the firm sought recruits to fill its’ Georgia plant workforce (Mathis, Jackson, & Valentine, 2014, p. 209). Kia Motors America utilized technology to set up an online application process that all applicants had to use; in order to prevent potential applicants without home internet from being able to apply, Kia Motors America worked with a Georgia Department of Labor agency to have computers made available at local colleges and libraries. Kia Motors America also made use of recruiting software to sort the applicants by work experience and educational levels. Kia Motors America’s strategic recruiting, planning, and operational efforts allowed the firm to hire 500 employees within a six month time frame and an additional 1,200 employees were hired after the six month time period had elapsed.

Kia Motors America’s hiring procedures has certain similarities shared by other large firms, however, it is also very different from the application procedures employed by smaller firms. In smaller firms there would not be the same demand for so many new employees during one time. The fact that a smaller firm would not be hiring as many people would mean that a labor agency would not be involved, that computers might not be able to be made available in colleges and libraries, and there would not be the same level of publicity. Smaller firms might lack the number of human resource employees needed in order to do enough research into a large number of applicants to prevent negligent hiring. These firms might also not possess the same technology level as a larger firm, meaning that an online application process and recruiting software might not be as efficient.

References

Mathis, R. L., Jackson, J. H., & Valentine, S. (2014). Human resource management (14th ed.).

Singapore: Cengage Learning Editores.

2. Discuss how utilizing the Internet, like Kia did and other employers do, is changing how recruiting efforts are occurring for a variety of jobs in employers of different sizes.

Utilizing the internet as Kia Motors America did and other employers do is changing how recruiting efforts are occurring. Kia Motors America and other firms use the internet to expedite the application process and the sorting of applicants. The fact that all applicants can be required to apply for job positions online means that all application records will be digital which makes filing, sorting, and researching the applicants more efficient. It takes human resource employees less time to sort through the applicants that have the correct credentials for the position because they can make use of recruiting software instead of having to sort paper applications manually. Human resource employees can also do background checks, reference checks, and educational checks through the internet which cuts down on the amount of time it takes to both send the requests and get the results back. The internet has allowed firms to do a larger variety of research into the applicant’s history and background in a more efficient manner which could potentially reduce negligent hiring and retention.

References

Mathis, R. L., Jackson, J. H., & Valentine, S. (2014). Human resource management (14th ed.).

Singapore: Cengage Learning Editores.

How would you do a complete background investigation on applicants to minimize concerns about negligent hiring?

How would you do a complete background investigation on applicants to minimize concerns about negligent hiring?

Background investigations are vital in minimizing concerns about negligent hiring and negligent retention. “Negligent hiring occurs when an employer fails to check an employee’s back-ground and the employee later injures or harms someone while performing job duties” (Mathis, Jackson, & Valentine, 2014, p. 242). If I was responsible for completing background investigations on job applicants, to reduce the risk of negligent hiring I would begin the process with a basic background check and a reference check. I would always begin with the quickest investigation method as it would be a waste of time to do a more in depth investigation only to discover that a simple background and reference check would have shown the applicant to be unsuitable for the position. While a background check might only show the problems a person has had with the law, a reference check would allow me to learn about the applicant’s personality and how the person works with other people. This would allow me to gauge the risk level of the applicant and give me the information I would need to decide if the applicant was unsuitable or if further investigation was required.

If the background and reference check did not turn up any risk factors I would then proceed to look at past job records, military records, and educational and certification records (Mathis, Jackson, & Valentine, 2014, p. 242). If the records all showed the applicant to be suitable for the position I would then do a final investigation which would include credit history, drug tests results, sex offender lists, and motor vehicle records. The results from these investigations would show if the applicant was a drug user, a violent person, a sex offender, a thief, and-or any other risk factors that could put other employees at risk. If after the investigations the applicant did not show any risk factors that could potentially lead to the harm of other employees, I would approve the applicant for potential hiring. I would also want to speak to all of the supervisors and managers about negligent retention to ensure that if there was a risk factor my investigation missed that they understood the need to bring the employee and risk factor to my attention. This would ensure that the company or organization would fire that employee so that there would be no liability in case of employee injury.

References

Mathis, R. L., Jackson, J. H., & Valentine, S. (2014). Human resource management (14th ed.).

Singapore: Cengage Learning Editores.

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