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NO BAGGY PANTS NO SERVICE!

Updated on July 10, 2012

Baggy Celebs, would they be stopped too?

IS IT DISCRIMINATION OR PROTECTING THE STORE?

I recently took a neighbor to run a few errands. The last stop was the gas station, so I decided to get some gas. As I walked in I read a sign, thought I was seeing things and went in to pump gas. I had to make sure I read what I thought I saw. As I walked out the door I did a double take. My first assumption was correct it said, "No baggy jeans no service! No shoes, no shirt, no service!" I was puzzled, by that time my neighbor was at the car as I pumped.

I asked her about the sign. She said, "Yes, I don't blame him one bit, they be robbing them! When a lot of people go into the store they go in and fill up. When the people from my job get off the van to get snacks on the way to work, this older white guy walked in and took a whole case of beer and walked out the store. They can't watch everybody." I thought an older white guys is not likely to be wearing baggy jeans. I also thought of the fad, the way kids dress and some adults these days. Baggy jeans is the style these days.

My neighbor reinforced my point by saying that some homosexual women pants are bagger than the men and you can't tell the difference. Then, I thought this is discrimination. Hence, not every kid/person that walks into your store with baggy jeans is going to rob you. It is dangerous stereotyping such as this that lead to dangerous situations and mistakes, because it is baited beneath fear. If the owner is truly concerned with people stealing than there are several other things he can do. When large groups are coming in he can limit the number of people in the store at one time.

He can hire security officers to be in the store, plenty of people do it in Atlanta, but this is a small town. If he is willing to ban a group of people based off of a few bad experiences, in order to truly rectify the situation he should pony up the dough and pay for security officers to be inside the store. To be hones,t I was offended and I don't wear baggy pants. In actuality you don't know someone's home life and can not judge their financial situation or their intent by what they are wearing. This is a town where people wear their pajamas to the store (crying out loud). I don't know if they don't have clothes or are clinically depressed. Maybe they think this is acceptable, maybe they were not taught to dress for success.

I am only supposing, maybe I will get the gumption to ask one, just didn't want to offend anyone, but I am also a strong believer in getting curious and challenging others views. Are they truly aware of how they are being perceived by others? Maybe I am wrong and I have totally missed the mark, but I think it is offensive to a culture of children and adults that are not looking to rob someone, but think they are making a fashion statement.

Some of them have no idea where the concept for wearing bagging jeans came from (prison). It was a way to let someone know you were homosexual. That is besides the point, but maybe if some knew what it meant they wouldn't be so apt to sag not only in prison, by sending the wrong message or in the public for fear of doing the same thing. I am not saying they can't wear baggy jeans, we as people have the right to dress how we please. I just think they should be made aware that everyone is not so open-minded and will judge and convict you based on your appearance. It's sad, but true. What do you think? Is it discrimination, stereotyping, an owner's right to protect his store, a safety must, weigh in?

An American Idol Contestants Song on Baggy Jeans

Marvin Gaye asks, "What's going on?"

Baggy not my cup of tea, but for some lovely?

What do you think?

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    • rcrumple profile image

      Rich 

      6 years ago from Kentucky

      Strong Post! First, prison is not where baggy pants came from, regardless of popular belief. This myth was created by fashion designers when rap artists started dressing this way. It made them seem tougher to associate them with prison. Baggy pants originated (as any person over 50 can tell you) decades ago. They were called "Hand-Me-Downs". If you came from a "poor" family, you inherited your older brothers pants (regardless if they fit or not) when you out grew yours. It was irritating to hear your mother say, "You'll grow into them" as they slid down you gluts! Again, that wouldn't sell pants, so the prison tale was developed! Next, hoodies and baggy pants have taken a bad rap of late, but, when was the last time a 7/11 was robbed by a guy in a three piece suit? However, it's not the first time baggy pants have been banned. Traveling carnivals used to be known for having a group of "gypsies" that would shoplift at every opportunity. They would wear baggy pants, or have compartments sewn into their dresses, in which it was easy to conceal what they were borrowing on a no return basis. They were either met at the door and refused entrance, or followed by assigned workers every second they were on the premises. Is it now and was it then discrimination? Look at it from the business owner's viewpoint. If patterns exist that create a loss of profit, you eliminate those patterns. Why lose money to someone that dresses like they're there to disrespect your efforts to keep your business operational by stealing? In the 60's, we sustained refusals of service in restaurants and other businesses because of our hair. Yet, there was nothing we could do as we were on private property. Discrimination? Maybe, but there's someplace else down the road to do business with if it's not to the persons liking. One last thing (God I'm sounding like I'm preaching, my apologies) You will get treated better when you dress up. It's normal. Why? Because if you look successful you'll be treated as successful. If you look as if you don't care about yourself, why should anyone else? It may not be right, but it's a way of life. Good Hub! Voted up and interesting. Again, apologize if I sound like I'm preaching...I'm not! You just made a lot of good points to discuss! : )

    • brittvan22 profile imageAUTHOR

      brittvan22 

      6 years ago from Atlanta, Georgia

      @rnmsn, i totally agree. I was telling someone this week I'm going to do a little investigating hubbing. People get fades from the craziest places. I got my information from actual prisoners.

    • RNMSN profile image

      Barbara Bethard 

      6 years ago from Tucson, Az

      Do you think this type of occurrence is seen mostly in small towns? I saw it mostly in Bay Minette Al and that type of mind-set as well. P as ersonnally, I thinks its disgusting to see someones underwear and butt crack in public just as much as I find it gross to see someone in their PJ and fluffly pink slippers/and yes, I agree with where the sagging began, sorry snopes,you are worng on this one,or perhaps it began simultaneously? no, it started in prison as the 'hidden pocket' so the deed could be done withut anyone hearing zippers go down or clothes disrobing

    • brittvan22 profile imageAUTHOR

      brittvan22 

      6 years ago from Atlanta, Georgia

      You know what I think I'm going to take it one step further and go out in pajamas and rollers and see the reactions to take a walk in their moccassins. (hopefully mental health won't pick me up.) They say walk a mile in their shoes, I'd do an hour and hub on it, lol. One think they should know is the world is full of ppl just like me who will ask, why do you have on those rollers its 6pm? (lots of young and old Virgos w/o filters, I used to be one.)

    • faith_love_hope32 profile image

      faith_love_hope32 

      6 years ago

      Maybe their trying to start a new trend with the hair rollers LOL.

    • brittvan22 profile imageAUTHOR

      brittvan22 

      6 years ago from Atlanta, Georgia

      @ Faith I definitely see your point with someone being disable (sn time i spent in their populace I learned that some of them have better fashion sense than most and better common sense, too.) lol. I often wonder if you had rollers in your hair all day and it hasn't curled by now you may want to seek out a profession for that, but if you are too lazy to take them out I have five minutes to spare for this worthy cause.

    • faith_love_hope32 profile image

      faith_love_hope32 

      6 years ago

      I'm more understanding of the teenagers but not grown ups with the pj's. I would never walk into a store with pajamas UNLESS I had some type of physical disability and was in too much pain to get dressed up to buy a gallon of milk. A situation like that I can understand. Hair rollers? wow. lol. Not surprised you saw that.

    • brittvan22 profile imageAUTHOR

      brittvan22 

      6 years ago from Atlanta, Georgia

      @ Kforce you are right that what you wear does matter in this society and can means the difference between a job and unemployment and in neighborhoods life and death especially in gang infested neighborhoods. I just think it shouldn't be a reason for discrimination or good vs. bad customer service. Thanks for your input.

      @faithhopelove32, I totally agree with you and I remember those times when that seems cool, but in this town its young as well as adult women wearing them (guess the men and boys know better). It can be 6am or 6pm and I see pajama bottoms and/or hair rollers. I'm always surprised. For me, its ok to wear sweats or dressing down, but in the afternoon to wear pajamas or rollers is wrong. I think hasn't your hair curled by now and for the pajamas, I think, is everything ok, you know those are pajama bottoms. I am for freedom, but also I am for have self-respect and taking pride in your appearance. I wonder if a news station popped up on them if they would run. Thanks for your thoughts glad to know I'm not the only one that sees this.

    • faith_love_hope32 profile image

      faith_love_hope32 

      6 years ago

      Lol - I have 2 teenage sons, so I have to comment on this and just had to read it. I completely agree with you about that sign. That is ridiculous. You can't tell if someone is going to steal based on how they are dressed.

      Does this store owner not realize how many well dressed people are smiling to his face and robbing him behind his back? lol - karma. As for the style itself. I can't stand it and never wanted my boys to wear their pants that way. They don't.

      Accept for the times that my 16yr old loses belt after belt after belt. Then his pants fall off sometimes. The pajamas? I had to laugh at that one lol because I live in a small town too and a lot of people do that here. People of all ages.

      I think mainly teenagers. My 2 boys usually dress well. The one boy is obsessed with style. And yet they will sometimes walk to the store in pajamas. This horrifies me! Even though....I did it as a teenager too sometimes. lol. When they do it, the first thought that comes to mind is that they are representing ME!

      I ask them nicely...aren't you going to change before you go to the store?? And I get the, "I don't care what anyone thinks of me." answer. I'm glad that they don't let other peoples opinions influence them because seeing it through their eyes and their words, I can understand what he's saying. I do think that we get treated based on how we are dressed in society.

      If I go to a store dressed down, I'm treated crappy. If I do my hair nice, a little makeup, dress cute, then people cater to me it seems and are more friendly. Pretty silly considering how I dress has nothing to do with how much money I have or spend.

    • kj force profile image

      kjforce 

      6 years ago from Florida

      Brittvan22..it's been like this since the dawn of time...people defying the system...or what they call fashion statements that are a bit bizarre...each generation has done this, problem being labels are put in place ( set by a certain few " bad apples")...people need to stop and think before choosing style of attire..it could get them killed....just my thoughts..

    • brittvan22 profile imageAUTHOR

      brittvan22 

      6 years ago from Atlanta, Georgia

      Thanks Warrior, I had a couple ppl tell me that were apart of the populace as well. Thanks for your input, with a name like Quiet warrior, are you one of my tribal brothers?

    • The-Quietwarrior profile image

      The-Quietwarrior 

      6 years ago

      You are absolutely right. The concept of baggy jeans worn below the buttocks is a prison custom. Not being ugly but from a viable source, the intent was to allow easy access to whomever "owned" you at the time. Need I say more. Even so, we have to educate our kids(and some adults), not stigmatize and stereotype them. Regardless, discrimination is discrimination, and I hate it in ANY form. Good article.

    • brittvan22 profile imageAUTHOR

      brittvan22 

      6 years ago from Atlanta, Georgia

      Thanks for your input, I will definitely check into the issue, none of my sources from this article came off the internet. Thanks for sharing!

    • profile image

      Ginger Ruffles 

      6 years ago

      Snopes is a service that looks into the truth of urban legends. Very handy for double checking all the internet stuff that travels around as gospel.

      This is for the baggy pants origins:

      http://www.snopes.com/risque/homosex/sagging.asp

    • brittvan22 profile imageAUTHOR

      brittvan22 

      6 years ago from Atlanta, Georgia

      @Gingar got the information from a documentary but what is snopes? Also I know quite a few people that have been in prison that confirmed the story, go figure.

    • profile image

      Ginger Ruffles 

      6 years ago

      Interesting hub Brittvan. I'm afraid the prison story is wrong though. You can check Snopes.

    • always exploring profile image

      Ruby Jean Richert 

      6 years ago from Southern Illinois

      I was unaware of this. I dislike baggy pants, but i don't wear them, some do and that's ok. Different strokes for different folks. I guess if i owned a store and people came in with baggy pants just to stuff them full of stolen goods, I would put the sign up..Cheers

    • brittvan22 profile imageAUTHOR

      brittvan22 

      6 years ago from Atlanta, Georgia

      @bethberry I can understand your position, his issue was he was being robbed and had deduced that people with baggy pants were the culprits, so he thought that was going to prevent robbery, because he couldn't see everyone in the store at all times. I do not think he carried if they were sagging, but I think stinky sagging is gross too, but 2 each their own. I think he should pony up the dough and hire security and install cameras if he is truly just trying to prevent robbery.

    • bethperry profile image

      Beth Perry 

      6 years ago from Tennesee

      I don't like discrimination one iota, but I wonder if the owner wasn't confusing "sagging" pants with baggy pants. I know many people are rather taken back by young men who walk around with their underwear showing, and especially if the underwear obviously hasn't been changed in awhile. Personally, I don't basically mind a fashion statement, but dirty drawers are kind of disgusting to see. I'd rather go to a nude beach and see clean skin walking around that that, lol!

      On the other hand, there was a shop owner in my area who put out a similar sign that read "Big pockets- no service" after he'd been robbed by a man and woman walked in with huge pockets and attempted to stuff those pockets with every thing they could knock off the shelves. It wasn't a racist or anti-lesbian thing - the couple were white and married; the shop owner just didn't want it to be tried again in his store.

    • brittvan22 profile imageAUTHOR

      brittvan22 

      6 years ago from Atlanta, Georgia

      @ Breakfastpop, My kind of guy! I agree it is the owners right as well, but as you said is your right not to do business with them, too. Wow, checking your bags before shopping, as if something from the store saw you and flew inside your bag. I can definitely understand your walking out! @ scarlettohara, SN my favorite character from Gone With The Wind, I saw the writers apartment, where the masterpiece was created in Atlanta, I was inspired. I do agree again also he can find a better way to solve the issue without using discrimination. I'm positive he wouldn't turn away Heidi Klum, because she was wearing baggy jeans, maybe he would. Thanks for your input!

    • scarletohara profile image

      scarletohara 

      6 years ago

      I think the owner can find another way to solve his problem a way which is not dicrimination to anyone

    • breakfastpop profile image

      breakfastpop 

      6 years ago

      I suppose it is the owner's right, but it is also the market's right to refuse to do business there. That's the way it should be. I was just talking about something like this last night. There used to be stores that asked the shopper to check their bags at the cash register before shopping. I always walked out!

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