ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel

How to become a Certified Associate in Project Management

Updated on May 28, 2020
LilianeNajm profile image

I have a sustained interest in yoga, meditation, Reiki and pilates mat exercises and I love writing.

Project Management

"A project by definition is a temporary undertaking to create a unique product, service, or result. Projects help the organization achieve its goals. Projects organize activities that are not addressed through usual day-to-day operations". (Copyright PM Educate / Virtual Course Providers LLC.)

If you want to create a new product or service, construct a building, deploy a new business process, improve a business process, or implement a new information system, then you have a project.

For me, studying teaches a way of thinking. The value of studying is in forming minds more than being a memory and recall exercise.

My Training

In 2015, I joined a global management consultant company in an administrative position. This company was the Canadian subsidiary of the second largest engineering company in the world. It was based in the USA and had a global workforce of 26,000 employees. I had been on the job for a year when I realized that I wanted to know more about the nature of the work my colleagues and directors did. I heard them talk a lot about projects and project management.

The requirements to train for the Certified Associate in Project Management (CAPM) were a secondary degree and 23 hours of project management education or experience. These requirements must be met before taking the final exam. I enrolled in an online course to get the required 23 hours of education. My involvement and long working hours with that company had enabled me to apply to this training with the Project Management Institute (PMI).

The Project Management certification was a higher level. I could not train for it as it required many more hours of experience and education than I had or was capable of having for this training.

I purchased a copy of A Guide to the Project Management Body Of Knowledge known as the PMBOK® Guide. This bulky guide is considered a fundamental resource for effective project management in any industry. It is a 592-page book that required a lot of studying on my part.

PMBOK® Guide

The PMBOK® Guide explores ten project management knowledge areas:

  1. Project Integration Management.
  2. Project Scope Management
  3. Project Schedule Management
  4. Project Cost Management
  5. Project Quality Management
  6. Project Resource Management
  7. Project Communications Management
  8. Project Risk Management
  9. Project Procurement Management
  10. Project Stakeholder Management

I studied every single word of this bulky guide to prepare for an exam that, as I heard, few people can pass from the first attempt. I was strong in the three areas of project quality management, project resource management and project risk management.

I also purchased the Project Management Review Guide 5th edition from the Virtual Course Providers LLC. This added to the total expenses that I incurred for this training.

To become certified, I had to pay an exam fee of US$300 and pass the final exam. It took me time to put aside the required amount. This is a strict exam with 150 multiple choice questions. If one fails, another fee of US$300 must be paid to take the final exam. It is known that few people can pass this final exam from the first sitting. I passed it on my first attempt. You should have seen me dancing in the parking lot after I got my results right after I finished the exam.

I was so proud of this accomplishment of mine that I framed my Certified Associate in Project Management (CAPM) certificate and displayed it in my office (that's of course before the Working From Home era due to COVID-19). People who knew me then never imagined I could be studying, let alone passing, this subject.

The Project Management Institute is the certified body. Its certification is designed to reflect an individual’s knowledge of project management processes and terminology.

Once the final exam is passed and you get a certificate, you are given the choice of becoming a member of the PMI. This means you must sit for the final exam every five years.

Impact on My Life

I did not need to have a CAPM certificate to be in the job that I hold now. However, I do not regret the hours and effort spent in becoming a CAPM. This training taught me a way of thinking that I find helpful in daily life. My anxiety level is reduced when I start a new project whatever it is. I know that I can achieve what I want when I put my mind to it. I also know how to divide projects, and even challenges in my personal life, into smaller parts and tackle each part separately with the means and resources at my disposal.

Lifelong learning as the ongoing and voluntary pursuit of knowledge for personal or professional reasons is important to me.


Comments

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    No comments yet.

    working

    This website uses cookies

    As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, hubpages.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

    For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: https://maven.io/company/pages/privacy

    Show Details
    Necessary
    HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
    LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
    Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
    AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
    Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
    CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
    Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
    Features
    Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
    Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
    Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
    Marketing
    Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
    Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
    Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
    Statistics
    Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
    ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)
    ClickscoThis is a data management platform studying reader behavior (Privacy Policy)