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The History of Black Friday and Where Does it End? - A Critical View

Updated on November 26, 2015
It looks like a scene from the zombie apocalypse but it's worse - It's Black Friday and these are living humans, supposedly in full control of their faculties.
It looks like a scene from the zombie apocalypse but it's worse - It's Black Friday and these are living humans, supposedly in full control of their faculties. | Source

SOL Days

We old farts like to reminisce about the past. As we drive down the road with our bored spouse on the passenger side and bored offspring in the back seat, we will pass a store or a sign or something else that sparks our memory of days gone by. Then, as our family members yawn in unison and start digging desperately to find the ear buds for their cell phones, we'll start off on another tired story that we have told dozens of times in the past - one that; although we are aware of this because we're not so senile yet as they think, we are convinced needs to be retold, for emphasis upon important principles.

The holiday season is a great time for ranting about the good old days, and Black Friday especially is one of those themes that I won't shut up about short of a sock shoved down my throat and my mouth duck taped shut. Yes, there has always been mass marketing, media inundation, and crass commercialism, but back in my day (a line I repeat often as I launch upon these tirades), it just wasn't so crass as it is now. Back then, 45 years ago, about the time I first started collecting and collating memories, a few things were still held sacred. A few things were still declared "off limits" to the corporate machines that drive the American economy. Two of these things were Thanksgiving and Christmas. celebrations considered inviolate, untouchable, hermetically sealed off for reunions with the family.

So with nobody paying attention except me, I start off on my little story about how one day my Father stopped in front of a store with a hopelessly empty parking lot on either Thanksgiving or Christmas Day. It really doesn't matter because the results would have been the same in either case, but he was hoping to grab a can of Cranberry Sauce or some other such substance that, though nauseating, seems to be a necessary part of the holiday ritual, even if nobody eats it. The store was closed. I remember my Father shading his eyes, leaning against the window and peering through the glass, hoping desperately somebody was in there that could open the door, or maybe searching for potential eyewitnesses so he could break and enter. I'm not sure what his intentions were, but the moral of the story is that the place was shut, sealed tighter than Tupperware (that's another old fart theme for another day), and he was basically SOL. "That means Sure out of Luck!" I remind my eye rolling audience with a touch of hokey Dad humor.

These days, on the other hand, nothing is sacred, everything is for sale. If you need that can of cranberry sauce or turkey gravy at 8:45 AM on the fourth Thursday of November you can be sure you are going to get it. You might have to stand in a hella long line; but then again you might not because once one store set a precedent by opening on Thanksgiving now they all have to do it, so on second thought you'll still make it home by kickoff. If you're in desperate need of a new flat screen because your drunk Uncle Ralph threw a chunk of unused cranberry sauce at your TV when the wrong team ran back an interception for a touchdown, you can probably go out and get that too, without missing a snap of the evening game.

The point is, I guess you'll be enjoying your Thanksgiving holiday, with your family, but those unfortunate minimum wage slaves working the registers and holding back the hordes of the walking dead that are going to burst through the WalMart doors at 5 PM on Thursday certainly won't be.

Where did it go, people? At what point did we sell out everything that is sacred, gentle, reflective and peaceful in our lives, and for what purpose? In addressing this topic I will try to answer a few head scratching questions that might have been nagging at you. How did this Black Friday phenomenon get rolling? What is its ultimate end, and are we there yet? Finally, will one less shopping day on the calendar send our economy into an irrecoverable tailspin?

Old newspaper clippings support the true origin of the Black Friday name.
Old newspaper clippings support the true origin of the Black Friday name. | Source

How Did It All Start?

My beef; if that particular animal flesh is an appropriate metaphor for a holiday associated with poultry, is not so much with Black Friday, but with how Black Friday has now invaded Thanksgiving, a family holiday that was once considered sacrosanct. The day after Thanksgiving has been a heavy shopping day ever since there was shopping, a fact that registers no complaints from me. A lot of people are off work, college football overload has set in, and people want to get out of the house quick before those creative turkey based concoctions start getting thrown together in the kitchen. What else is there to do besides fall into a Tryptophan-induced coma or go shopping?

The problem, really, is that roughly over the last decade or so, the greedy fingers of this phenomenon called Black Friday have been steadily entwining themselves around the soul of its older, more respected, but less aggressive brother Thanksgiving. This means that the holiday that once stood for relaxing family gatherings has been steadily losing ground, to the point where the two calendar days are now virtually indistinguishable from one other in terms of theme and purpose.

There are many beliefs in circulation about the origin of the Black Friday name. Googling the topic results in a few dozen articles from so-called legitimate news outlets that appear to have all copied the same information from the same source, so perusing three or four of these is enough to become acquainted with the most popular theories.

The most bizarre of these ideas, now debunked, is a Twitter rumor that the Friday after Thanksgiving was the day that slave owners sold off their excess slaves at a discount. Although the concept of slavery and Thanksgiving still seem to walk hand and hand for millions of American workers, and it certainly would be satisfying if this origin story was true, there is no historical basis for the report. The date for Thanksgiving wasn't even fixed by Presidential proclamation until 1863, when slavery was in its death throes, so this one is easily dismissed.

A second proposal is that the day after Thanksgiving has always generated an inordinate amount of sick calls to the office, causing a gloomy, perhaps black atmosphere in the business community. When half the work force is ill and they can all prove it with doctor's notes, it sends the boss into a dark mood. Again, this one causes some eye rolling, as it appears to be the product of a fanciful imagination fixated on the idea that Americans are lazy and need to get their butts into work.

A third idea, one that at least sounds more credible, is that Black Friday is the day where businesses finally turn the corner from red ink losses and start writing the balance sheets in black Ink profits. In other words, in this case the word "black" is a happy thing, a veritable boon to the economy! I believe this one was propagated by corporations to make it appear that they are the real Black Friday victims, not the cashiers and stockers they bring in to work on Thanksgiving evening to deal with obsessed, rampaging shoppers. The truth is that very few legitimate businesses have enough cash to operate at a loss 10 months out of the year, and the stockholders of that corporation would most certainly have that failed CEO's stuffed and basted head on a platter, instead of your holiday bird.

The most viable idea, and the one that has the most supporting documentation, is that the "Black Friday" name came into popularity in Philadelphia, the city of brotherly love, to describe the traffic snarl that occurred in downtown Philly on the Friday after Thanksgiving, when the shopping inundation was compounded by the crowds generated by the Army-Navy game. The term seemed to be the exclusive property of Philadelphia for several decades, before finally achieving escape velocity and propagating outward to the rest of the country a little after the turn of the 21st century, when the term Black Friday gained fame and momentum.

Soulless Walking Dead Black Friday "walker" shoppers beat down the gates of Alexandria.
Soulless Walking Dead Black Friday "walker" shoppers beat down the gates of Alexandria. | Source

Where Has it Gone?

Commercialism is not necessarily a bad thing. Commercialism signs the paychecks that fill the holiday shopping basket. I'm okay with that, I'm down with that. All of the left-leaning news sites I looked at when researching this article were inundated with Black Friday ads from all the top retail corporations, just as I am hoping this article will be, and my heartfelt holiday prayer is for you to click on these ads. So let's not be hypocrites, but let's also realize that too much of a good thing turns us into obsessed, heartless zombies. Too much opium or any other drug will turn you into a soulless shell, and so will too much shopping.

People going Christmas shopping the day after Thanksgiving has been around pretty much since there has been a Thanksgiving. It is the day that has traditionally signaled the start of the Holiday shopping season. Heck, supposedly worker friendly President Franklin D. Roosevelt changed the Thanksgiving holiday from the last, to the second to the last Thursday in November for a while to placate retailers who wanted a longer shopping season. It has now been re-codified as the fourth Thursday, regardless of what day that falls on, but the point is that Black Friday is the starting gun that sends us sprinting off the blocks to the shopping mall.

What gets under my crispy roasted skin, akin to a thermometer being poked into cooking poultry, is that hungry, greedy Black Friday wants to completely absorb its gentle calendar partner, swallow it up like some sort of ravenous, life sucking amoeba. An unwritten rule that existed for decades prior to the current holiday shopping circus, was that the Friday after Thanksgiving retail rush began began on 6 AM, on Friday. In the late 2000s many retailers moved this up to 4 or 5 AM. People camped out in the cold to be the first in line for the promised deals and I say if they want to, let 'em. Then, in 2011, Wal Mart, Target, Macys, Best Buy, Kohls and other department stores started opening at midnight between Thanksgiving and Black Friday. A year later, this became 6 PM on Thanksgiving. At present writing in 2015, Black Friday has now completely gobbled up Thanksgiving, devouring it like some insane, infectious, carnivorous, cannibalistic Turkey rampaging through the barnyard. Now stores open up early on Thanksgiving for your shopping convenience and enjoyment.

So you're going to have your fun watching football, drinking champagne, and loosening your belt for a post-feast nap on the couch, but what about those millions of Americans for whom the Thanksgiving holiday has basically ceased to exist, the ones who have to scarf down their giblets in a frenzy of indigestion before rushing off to work? In 2013, before the Thanksgiving holiday had been snuffed out completely by the corporate shopping plague, one million workers were called in for the holiday at Wal Mart alone. Now that the stores are opening early in the morning, that number can probably be doubled for this single mass retailer alone, and if we extend this across multiple retailers, the dreary fact is that a significant portion of the American work force is going to work on Thanksgiving, whether they choose to or not. The pro Black Friday argument I always hear from people, mostly avid shoppers, is that the companies only take volunteers to work on Thanksgiving day, and they are well compensated. While this may have been true back in the nascent stages of Black Friday's midnight intrusion upon Thanksgiving, I find it impossible to believe that it remains the case when stores remain open around the clock on Thursday and Friday.

So while the billionaire members of the Walton family are having a wonderful time toasting and relaxing beside the fireplace, probably with a few of their conservative Christian supporters who extol the virtues of "family values" even while ignoring the disruption of families this disgraceful profanation of the Thanksgiving holiday has created, multiple millions of Moms, Dads, and their offspring are going to be slaving away to make them more multiple millions or dollars, so the Waltons can continue to celebrate family values with their friends, uninterrupted by the stress or complications created by the Black Friday shopping crowds.


Posted in a Toys R. Us swing room.  Woe betide you should you choose to rock the Black Friday boat!  This was taken from a conservative website.
Posted in a Toys R. Us swing room. Woe betide you should you choose to rock the Black Friday boat! This was taken from a conservative website. | Source

Was It Worth It? What Can be Done?

I suppose the question that really needs answering is whether our Black Friday fixation delivers as advertised? Do all the empty seats around the Thanksgiving table pay off for the country, kick starting the shopping season for an economic boost that will trickle down a bounty of monetary benefits for those masses suffering through the chaos at the shopping mall?

Contrary to its overblown legend, Black Friday is not the busiest shopping day of the year in terms of sales. A lot of the Black Friday crowd consists of bored holiday, "looky-loo" revelers seeking to participate in the grand spectacle, but many of these folks aren't really that interested in buying anything. In recent years, Black Friday always ranks between fourth and eighth on the top holiday shopping days list, with the Saturday before Christmas still kicking everyone's butt, hands down. In recent years Cyber Monday has been gaining in popularity too - this being a peaceful activity in which shoppers stay quietly at home, ordering gifts on the Internet, meaning nobody gets trampled to death in a mad rush for the Xbox that is 20 dollars off. The Cyber Monday windfall further cuts into the Black Friday sales, which begs the question - why do they keep ruining Thanksgiving even more, every year?

So the answer to my earlier query, the one about whether eliminating Thanksgiving from the holiday shopping day list will send the economy into a disastrous downward spiral is most certainly - no.

I am not the only one busy ranting about Black Friday's deleterious effects upon the human soul, there are entire movements dedicated to taking back Turkey Day. Facebook communities exist dedicated to the proposition of ending Black Friday slavery. There is a "Buy Nothing" movement that protests mass consumerism in general, and directs its diverse forms of shopping disobedience to Black Friday in particular, which it declares to be "Buy Nothing Day." One of my favorite protests organized by this movement is the zombie walk, in which non shoppers stumble around department stores with a blank stare, bouncing off merchandise maybe but buying nothing, or they form a conga line of shopping carts, which parade their way through the stores without putting anything at all in the baskets.

"Back in my day," this old fart's Thanksgiving Holiday was still sacred. Yes, there was a rush of advertising build up prior to the celebration, and people went to the stores in droves on Friday, but Thanksgiving itself was considered sacred and above profanation. It was a time to give thanks for our bounty and blessings, not a time to bemoan the fact that Junior had to force swallow his Thanksgiving feast down whole, like a boa constrictor, to be at work by 4 PM.

So this year, instead of just drinking a toast to those empty seats that couldn't be with us, why don't we stay home on Thanksgiving and boycott the entire soul sucking ordeal? Will enjoying a little bit of quiet dignity once or twice a year kill us? Let's build our own Great Wall between Black Friday and Thanksgiving, and woe to the marauding Mongols that try to cross it.

Black Friday Dehumanization

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Do You Intend to Participate in Thanksgiving Shopping This Year?

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    • Elsie Hagley profile image

      Elsie Hagley 20 months ago from New Zealand

      Interesting article, we don't have Thanksgiving or Black Friday in New Zealand.

      I always look forward to the first of December, start of summer for us and usually get the feeling of enjoyment and looking forward to Christmas with the family as that day approaches, out comes the Christmas decoration and up goes the tree, and looking forward to summer holidays at the beach.

    • Mel Carriere profile image
      Author

      Mel Carriere 20 months ago from San Diego California

      Those are all wholesome, happy thoughts Elsie, much better than being trampled in a mad rush to the electronics department. Thanks for reading!

    • Jodah profile image

      John Hansen 20 months ago from Queensland Australia

      Hi Mel, like Elsie, here in Australia we don't have Thanksgiving and "Black Friday" to us is only any Friday that happens to fall on the 13th of the month. I imagine our closest equivalent is our "Boxing Day" sales when you can buy almost everything for about half the inflated price you paid for presents before Christmas. Thank you for enlightening me on all the advertisements and posts I have been seeing recently about 'Black Friday'..I had no idea what it was all about as it is nowhere near the 13th.

    • Mel Carriere profile image
      Author

      Mel Carriere 20 months ago from San Diego California

      Believe me Jodah you are not missing out on anything. My son popped into a store yesterday on Thanksgiving Thursday, which is when Black Friday starts now, and he said it was insane. Thanks for reading.

    • Ericdierker profile image

      Eric Dierker 20 months ago from Spring Valley, CA. U.S.A.

      Tsk tsk to those poor souls. Being a greedy miser, I don't spend no money for others so no need to shop. Although I noted something that said most people do this "self gifting thing"- weird that!

      Today is rainy Friday - so my boy and I will build forts, eat leftovers and watch Goofey's Christmas cartoons. I always new the Philly was the land of brotherly shove.

    • Eldon Arsenaux profile image

      Eldon Arsenaux 20 months ago from Cooley, Texas

      The Cult of Commercialism, Mel. My! How stuffy I get when groaning about the 'new' gods of materialism. Well, as Mama said, if you can't beat 'em, take 'em sunny side up.

      So, nevertheless, Seasons Greetings Mr. Carriere, and thanks for this informative hub filled with funny Turkey-symbolism. I will finish yesterday's wine from the California vine, sipping slowly and morosely, as I upturn my blotched Rudolph nose to material agencies, knowing, FULL & well I will be playing those Reindeer games soon enough.

      From one, amongst many, opting out of shopping (today),

      -E.G.A.

    • Keino C profile image

      Keino Chichester 20 months ago from Brooklyn, NY

      Really good Hub. I never really understand why the experience has to be so extreme.

      I think of it logically: I have to spend a few hours on lines and a few more on the mall's battlefield to buy a few hundred dollars worth of merchandise. I strongly considering the cost of my time for any Black Friday shopping venture. Furthermore, my time will be worth a premium on the night of a Family Holiday. No matter how much I save, Its certainly not worth it. Besides, online stores always have what I want and as cheap if not cheaper than any mall promotion. I can even do it all in my PJs. And why would I want to beat on strangers when I have a house full of family members who deserve it?!

      We should make it sleepy Friday as its 3:45pm at the time of this post and I've only gotten out of bed for RR and leftovers. ;)

    • profile image

      Pat Mills 20 months ago from East Chicago, Indiana

      I participate in Small Business Saturday. My local businesses deserve the support. I have no interest in being out with the crowds. I have no real need to start my Christmas shopping a month early when I have a month to easily complete it with the same sorts of offers. Besides, if you were on Chicago's Magnificent Mile on Friday, you would have found more protesters than shoppers. This year, I wanted Black Friday to simply bask in an unexpected Thanksgiving night victory by the Bears over the Packers, as well as a lovely Thanksgiving dinner at my brother's house. Just remember - these are not SOL days if we don't let the commercialism affect us that much. Thanks for sharing a bit of this holiday weekend with us.

    • billybuc profile image

      Bill Holland 20 months ago from Olympia, WA

      This new part-time job of mine is severely limiting my time to read hubs. I'm sorry I'm so late here. I hate Black Friday....I hate what it represents and I'm not too cranked up about consumerism in general. :) And what really bothers me is it comes the day after Thanksgiving, a day that represents all that should be important...family and friends. :)

    • Mel Carriere profile image
      Author

      Mel Carriere 20 months ago from San Diego California

      Self gifting is my thing Eric, because otherwise I would have no presents under the tree. Sounds like you are going to have a completely satisfying day. Thanks for reading!

    • Mel Carriere profile image
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      Mel Carriere 20 months ago from San Diego California

      Glad you caught the turkey symbolism Eldon. The fruit of the vine can help dull the pain when all our drinking companions are either working or sowing the seeds of future Black Friday proliferation. Thanks for dropping in, but you could have left a bottle of that grape on the table on your way out.

    • Mel Carriere profile image
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      Mel Carriere 20 months ago from San Diego California

      You truly have the spirit of the season Keino. A friend of mine stood in line from 8:30 until 6 pm yesterday at office depot to buy a tablet. Almost didnt get it because there were only 3. You are right when you say that the value of time should be factored into Black Friday decisions. Thanks for reading!

    • Mel Carriere profile image
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      Mel Carriere 20 months ago from San Diego California

      The commercialism affects us all Mills when the Thanksgiving head count around the table gets lower every year. I was amazed and happy that my son didn't work this year. Glad to hear about the protesters. I think small business Saturday is a noble cause. Thanks for reading!

    • Mel Carriere profile image
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      Mel Carriere 20 months ago from San Diego California

      I didn't know you were working a part time job Bill, you continue to amaze me with all the hats you wear. Your neck must get really sore. I am not so upset with Black Friday as much as I am about how it has taken over Thursday. Thanksgiving is practically not a holiday any more. Thanks for reading!

    • Venkatachari M profile image

      Venkatachari M 20 months ago from Hyderabad, India

      Very interesting facts. I, once or twice, already researched about this Black Friday and it was very much astonishing to me, gaining more prominence than Thanksgiving Day.

      Here in India, we have Dussehra to Diwali shopping spree for one full month. So, the crowds mostly spread out throughout the period and it won't be so much hazardous.

      Your views about the slavery ( forcing people to work on holidays) is a much alarming fact which is true all over the world. I myself had to work on most holidays as an account of Cement Corporation for many years of my prime life creating tensions in my family life.

    • Mel Carriere profile image
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      Mel Carriere 20 months ago from San Diego California

      That is a very sad story Venkatachari. People need to stand up to these abuses and say people first, profits second. Thanks for reading.

    • DaveOnline profile image

      David Edward Lynch 20 months ago from Port Elizabeth, South Africa

      I think we 'celebrated' Black Friday' for the first time here in South Africa yesterday, I don't know why it has such an odd name, a bit scary. I happened to be doing my grocery shopping and only found 1 item on 'special'. Thanks for enlightening me about it somewhat. We don't celebrate Thanksgiving here but we sure have Christmas!

    • DDE profile image

      Devika Primić 20 months ago from Dubrovnik, Croatia

      Black Friday is not celebrated in Croatia. I think that people who behave in such a manner during shopping is disgusting.

    • Mel Carriere profile image
      Author

      Mel Carriere 20 months ago from San Diego California

      Thank you Dave. From what I read, Black Friday is trying to wrsp its creepy tentacles around the globe. It seems like a name better designed to promote terrorism than shopping, but even though they have tried to change the name it has stuck for good. The South African perspective is interesting. Thanks for dropping by!

    • Mel Carriere profile image
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      Mel Carriere 20 months ago from San Diego California

      It really is disgusting Davika. I think some Black Friday shoppers just go out hoping they will see a fight, or at least see their fellow humans behave like animals. Thanks for reading!

    • justthemessenger profile image

      James C Moore 20 months ago from The Great Midwest

      The video inluded with your article has some very disturbing images. It just shows how easy it is to manipulate people. Maybe the behavior shown there is the real reason to call it black friday.

    • Mel Carriere profile image
      Author

      Mel Carriere 20 months ago from San Diego California

      justthemessenger, black is indeed an appropriate metaphor for the condition of the human soul that exists on Black Friday. Thanks for reading!

    • Suhail and my dog profile image

      Suhail Zubaid aka Clark Kent 20 months ago from Mississauga, ON

      I have no feeling for Black Friday. Hatred and dislike would only add to it being noted. So I conveniently ignore it altogether.

      Thanks for sharing great thoughts.

    • Mel Carriere profile image
      Author

      Mel Carriere 20 months ago from San Diego California

      Anymore it's hard to ignore Suhail. It infects us all in insidious ways. Thanks for reading !

    • kalinin1158 profile image

      Lana ZK 20 months ago from California

      Love your rants! And I'm with you 100%. Black Friday should just be Buy Nothing Day, or Leftovers Day :)

    • Mel Carriere profile image
      Author

      Mel Carriere 20 months ago from San Diego California

      Thank you Svetlana. I really hope you had a lovely Thanksgiving with your friends,, family, pets or all three. Hub Pages gives me a license to rant, I guess. Thanks for dropping by.

    • Dana Tate profile image

      Dana Tate 20 months ago from LOS ANGELES

      Corporate greed and the sad part is the employees must sacrifice valuable family time to slave for minimum wage. The greed for the almighty dollar is destroying the sanctity of family. At our Thanksgiving gathering, some younger family members are gobbling down their dinner while anxiously checking their smartphones in order to make it on time to the stores.

    • Larry Rankin profile image

      Larry Rankin 20 months ago from Oklahoma

      Believe it or not, I've never been to a Black Friday. I make for sure I have everything I need, and don't leave the house until at least Sunday:-)

      Very interesting overview of the busiest shopping day's origin.

    • Mel Carriere profile image
      Author

      Mel Carriere 20 months ago from San Diego California

      Dana that's another aspecy that didnt even occur to me. It disrupts family celebrations because people worry about getting in line for feals. S friend of mine spent his whole Thanksgiving in line. Thanks for reading!

    • Mel Carriere profile image
      Author

      Mel Carriere 20 months ago from San Diego California

      I never have either Larry. I dont like store crowds on a normal day. Back in "my day" you had to make sure you had all the provisions you needed on Thanksgiving because nothing was open, and people liked it that way. Thanks for reading.

    • aviannovice profile image

      Deb Hirt 19 months ago from Stillwater, OK

      It all comes back to money, sadly. That's why most restaurants are closed on that day, as they know it isn't profitable for them.

    • Mel Carriere profile image
      Author

      Mel Carriere 19 months ago from San Diego California

      It looks like perhaps Thanksgiving will prove to be unprofitable as well, Deb. I read somewhere sales were down 11% from last year. Perhaps the novelty will wear off and we can go back to a quiet, happy Thanksgiving once more.

    • Eldon Arsenaux profile image

      Eldon Arsenaux 19 months ago from Cooley, Texas

      Is it possible the trend will move to cyber shopping? Sales-Apps are already under way this year so companies can attain massive sales without severe societal reproach. Sadly, yes, it comes to money, aviannovice. Moreover, perhaps a few broken bones and black eyes will make the madness less agreeable, as media-tongues turn sour.

      Tis unfortunate how fortunes are made on trampled backs. "Oogah oogah, Strong need exponential sales." -as the stampede starts.

      -E.G.A.

    • Mel Carriere profile image
      Author

      Mel Carriere 19 months ago from San Diego California

      I think I saw in the Wall Street Journal Eldon (one of the perks of being a mailman is that you get to read the magazines for free), that Black Friday sales are down 11 percent. Perhaps the word is getting around that you can get the same deal shopping at home. Maybe Black Friday will just die a natural death.

    • profile image

      dy0pxa 19 months ago

      Nice hub, but true about Black Friday.

    • Mel Carriere profile image
      Author

      Mel Carriere 19 months ago from San Diego California

      Thank you dy0pxa. True indeed.

    • lawrence01 profile image

      Lawrence Hebb 19 months ago from Hamilton, New Zealand

      Mel

      I could say I'm glad that we don't have a 'black friday' in our calendar but the truth is our 'holidays' are under siege too!

      Here in NZ we only have Christmas day, Easter Sunday and Anzac day (April 26th when we remember the Gallipoli landings) as still sacred but even Christmas and Easter might not be for too much longer, but HANDS OFF ANZAC DAY!!

      As for the shoppers, ask yourself "is the credit. card gping to get paid off this month?" If not, ygen do you realy need the stuff?

      Good pause for thought here

      Lawrence

    • Mel Carriere profile image
      Author

      Mel Carriere 19 months ago from San Diego California

      I think we have 11 recognized federal holidays here, Lawrence. 3 is not much at all. As a matter of fact, Easter is not one of those holidays. Interesting comparison between our two countries, Gallipoli is an interesting subject, you should write a hub on it. Thanks for reading!

    • lawrence01 profile image

      Lawrence Hebb 19 months ago from Hamilton, New Zealand

      Mel

      We have about the same, but only three that haven't totally lost out to commercialism!

      Sadly fewer and fewer people are calling themselves 'christian' here so Christmas and Easter are losing ground in that area but Anzac day is different!

      I've got a hub called 'Anzacs' that tell you about them and Gallipoli, basically every family in Australia and New Zealand has someone buried at Anzac cove in Turkey! April 26th is the date they landed and dawn the time they went ashore!

      Its heartwarming to see the dawn service on Anzac day with the old soldiers stood side by side with their Grandkids and great Grandkids remembering or learning about the price of freedom!

      Lawrence

    • Mel Carriere profile image
      Author

      Mel Carriere 19 months ago from San Diego California

      I must read that Lawrence. I always assumed Anzac was an acronym for Australia-New Zealand something something, since Anzac is celebrated religiously in both places. Romnel thought the Kiwis were the best fighters, by the way. I know that was a different war. Thanks for filling in the gaps in my knowledge.

    • vocalcoach profile image

      Audrey Hunt 14 months ago from Nashville Tn.

      No black Friday shopping for this kid. I despise the very idea of it. This beautiful holiday has been turned into a commercial night mare. Give me the old days (here I go) before this sad occurrence began.

      Great hub!

      Audrey

    • Mel Carriere profile image
      Author

      Mel Carriere 14 months ago from San Diego California

      Thank you Audrey. I just find it rather disgusting that probably half of America has to work on Thanksgiving now, which is supposed to be a family holiday. I appreciate you dropping in.

    • nnms profile image

      Seiboi Misao 12 months ago from India

      We don’t have such Black Friday in India. Many people from the hilly areas of North Eastern states of India come in large number one / two weeks before Christmas to shop in cities and towns. On such occasion many of the student bodies formed volunteers in cooperation with district authority so that naïve, pure hearted villagers are not cheated by the profit-oriented shop keepers.

    • Mel Carriere profile image
      Author

      Mel Carriere 12 months ago from San Diego California

      That's a beautiful thing, nnms, that there are,people willing to help the villagers. Thanks for reading!

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