ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel

What Is The Real Truth About The Majority of British People on Unemployment Benefits?

Updated on December 10, 2019
compu-smart profile image

I'm not claiming to be a whistle-blower or grass/snitch.The following information is to highlight an issue which is more than a problem!

Introduction

Terminology:

  • US government support payments are called Welfare.
  • UK (British) government support payments are called Benefits. There are many types of benefits including Income Support. Universal Credit. Job-seekers Allowance and Employment Support Allowance. How benefits work - Benefit calculators.

"The real truth; not all of them actually need any government benefits!"

The main reason which inspired me to write this article: I recently visited one of the "Blue Cross" animal charities, and I'm always happy to leave a £5 donation which is almost half of my daily government benefit allowance. But this particular time I was broke due to not having work. Not only that, I had moved home which caused me to get into considerable debt, paying for the removals and other expenses.

Anyway, I picked up my pet and went to the hatch to collect the prescription to leave a donation. I said "I only have £2:00" to give which I thought was acceptable considering my position. To be honest, I would rather have given them nothing and bought £2.00 worth of groceries which I needed. While handing over my money, I explained that I was on benefit, before I could continue to mention that I was having severe financial problems, she responded with, "everyone who uses our free services is on benefits". I handed her the two pounds and left.

I wish I had could have told her that, "although I'm on benefits, It's the only source of income I have, unlike the hustlers and scammers on benefits who abuse the system and can afford to donate £10, £15 or even a £20 I often see people donate to you".

Who is entitled to benefits?

When someone becomes unemployed, It's the job of the UK "Department for Work and Pensions" (DWP). They are responsible for welfare, pensions and child maintenance policies. Their job is to calculate how much each claimant needs to live on, including paying their rent (housing benefit) as well as helping people get back into work. Unfortunately, many people in life are far too lazy to work, relying solely on benefits.

"Rich House Poor House" is a television documentary where two families from opposite ends of the wealth class swap homes for seven days to see how the other half truly lives. It shows that living entirely on benefits is possible. Video below: Skip to 12:30 to see how much money both families has to live on each week.

Rich House Poor House

I'm not taking anything away from...

Those law-abiding citizens on benefits who are legitimately physically or mentally unable to work. Those who have nothing to live on, besides the benefits provided by the government.

Or, the law-abiding foreign-born /non-EU nationals who are subject to immigration control who have no or limited access to benefits.

Or, the genuine law-abiding unemployed people who spend every day actively searching for work, to no avail and those who are on a zero-hours contract and/ or on a minimal hourly wage.

For some, it's a difficult struggle trying to survive each day on benefits, especially when a TV or washing machine suddenly breaks and need replacing, or parents who need to buy new clothes or footwear for their growing children. However, there are many charities, and government organisations to help anyone in a financial crisis.

Unfortunately, many benefit claimants are hustling and cheating in a variety of illegal and/or immoral ways. There are some out there doing legal work while still claiming benefits and not paying taxes, which is illegal. This is about the variety of hustlers & scammers on benefits.

The Variety of Hustlers & Scammers on Benefits - Exposed

The general rule: Anyone can work while claiming benefits as long as they don't earn more than £20 a week (the permitted work limits). Anyone who earns more without notifying the DWP are committing an offence.

1/6

  • 'Ponces/spongers on benefits' are people who spend their life poncing and scrounging from anyone. Poncing a few cigs here, a few pounds there, which all ads up. I have had many people on benefits ask me for money and cigarettes. Even when they know they already have more than me! When I became unemployed due to a serious injury, the debts started to pile-up, but I had too much pride (which is a disability in itself) to ask anyone for anything.
  • The 'can I borrow some money people on benefits' who will ask to loan money without any intention of repaying it. I'm still waiting for the return of hundreds of pounds I have loaned people. I have since learned to never loan money to a friend, family member or an acquaintance. If anyone is in genuine need and I have the spare cash, I will give it as a gift. Relationships often fall-apart from loaning money, as evidenced on the many TV shows such as Jeremy Kyle, Judge Rinder and Judge Judy.

When I was broke, starvation had no time for sentiments

I have never begged, borrowed or stolen. I sold all my sentimental jewellery, electronic gadgets, videos, DVD's and CDs. My record collection and record player. Clothing, sofas, including the dining room table and chairs were all sold. It was either sell or starve. All I had left were basic white goods, a bed, computer, and a couple of chairs, but I still had my pride and self-respect. It's through hard work and determination that I got back on my feet.

2/6

  • 'Criminals on benefits' who rob and burglarise homes to fund their lavish lifestyle. I have been a victim on numerous occasions where my personal belongings have been stolen. However, I invited those people who I thought were friends into my home. Thinking back, I just wished I had listened to my head instead of my heart.
  • The most popular profession for those on benefits is shop shoplifting. A nice earner for many people on benefits. They have the best quality products and designer clothes. Items that people who work cannot even afford, especially those on a minimal wage. Shoplifting has become more popular because the police will not charge shoplifters who steal item under £200.
  • The 'non-shoplifters on benefits' who pay shoplifters to steal their weekly shopping list for them. They then buy stolen tobacco, alcohol, toiletries and food with their benefit money. These non-shoplifters have lots of spare cash each week to fritter away on bingo, lottery tickets, food takeaways, etc. They can even afford to have a holiday or two each year. I still have their postcards which say, "Wish You Were Here", and yes, I bloody wished I could afford to be there!

Shameless shoplifter steals to fund a lavish lifestyle

3/6

  • The 'drug dealers on benefits' earn so much money, they don't need any benefits. One particular comment I remember a drug dealer on benefits bragging about was; "I found a thousand pounds In my kitchen I never realised I had!". One drug-dealer used his benefits and proceeds from drug dealing to buy a house.
  • 'Male and female sex workers on benefits'. It's so easy and enticing to become a prostitute/call-girl/boy/escort, because they have something they can sell again and again! They are unlike drug dealers and shoplifters who have to buy or steal what they need to sell. One of my previous neighbours who lived upstairs was a male prostitute. His doorbell used to ring all day and night. His price was £100 an hour! Plus benefits! Although he did take Sundays off.
  • The 'employees on benefits'. No one knows the exact percentage of how many people are illegally working full or part-time while claiming benefits. If the percentage is low, it's still a percentage and a crime. They are also stealing from tax payers.
  • 'In business on benefits'. I know someone who makes and designs clothing and sells them online, yet makes no effort to pay taxes or make an effort to become a successful legitimate businesswoman and employ genuinely unemployed people on benefits who are desperate to get back to work.

Police swoop on disability benefit fraudsters

4/6

  • The 'drug dealers on benefits' earn so much money, they don't need any benefits. One particular comment I remember a drug dealer on benefits bragging about was; "I found a thousand pounds In my kitchen I never realised I had!". One drug-dealer used his benefits and proceeds from drug dealing to buy a house.
  • 'Male and female sex workers on benefits'. It's so easy and enticing to become a prostitute/call-girl/boy/escort, because they have something they can sell again and again! They are unlike drug dealers and shoplifters who have to buy or steal what they need to sell. One of my previous neighbours who lived upstairs was a male prostitute. His doorbell used to ring all day and night. His price was £100 an hour! Plus benefits! Although he did take Sundays off.
  • The 'employees on benefits'. No one knows the exact percentage of how many people are illegally working full or part-time while claiming benefits. If the percentage is low, it's still a percentage and a crime. They are also stealing from tax payers.
  • 'In business on benefits'. I know someone who makes and designs clothing and sells them online, yet makes no effort to pay taxes or make an effort to become a successful legitimate businesswoman and employ genuinely unemployed people on benefits who are desperate to get back to work.

Does the UK have a 'Fake Homeless' problem?

5/6

  • I don't know any benefit claimant who are claiming benefits using multiple identifications. I doubt the government will ever know the exact figure.
  • The eBay sellers on benefits who spend their days visiting car-boot stalls and charity shops, buying items for pennies and selling them for pounds. Very entrepreneurial, but they are still thieves, stealing money from the government they are not entitled too.
  • The 'living abroad while claiming benefits'. A former friend's father moved to another country and his son used to post him his benefits, which in those days were paper cheques called 'giro's' sent through the post. I have no idea what benefits or wages he was also earning/claiming in the country he was now residing in!
  • The 'ostentatious and frivolous people on benefits'. Instead of buying food or paying their bills, they spend all their benefits on tattoos, PC games, Sky subscriptions, and then use food banks and/ or the above ways to earn extra income. A former neighbour would always complain about paying bills. I just wish I had said, "why don't you get rid of your SKY subscription, and stop heating your home like a sauna 24/7 if you're complaining of paying the excessive bill? Why don't you sell your car if you're always complaining about paying car insurance, tax, fuel, MOT and other expenses and do yourself and the environment a favour!"
  • The people with (fake physical/mental health problems) receive extra income on top of their weekly benefit allowance. Many are genuine, but others are abusing the system and faking their true disability. Some pretend they are too injured or disabled to walk very far. Others pretend they need a walking stick or crutch to get about. Due to their disability these people have to be 'seen' using their walking aids in order to continue claiming those extra benefits. If they are seen without their stick, they will lose their extra disability benefits. You can easily observe these people in everyday life.

Fake beggars with a fake disability make £100,000 year

6/6

  • The majority of people on benefits will also receive extra cash from a combination of friends, neighbours, relatives, or a partner, who are all either working or unemployed, or working while pretending to be unemployed and claiming benefits illegally.
  • The lazy people on benefits who are so bone-idle that if laziness was a disease they would be crippled. These people have no intention of seeking work. Why should they when the government continually pays their rent and living expenses? The unemployed are so lazy to work that the UK has to import immigrants to do the work that British people won't do, such as cleaning and catering.
  • The illegal buskers on benefits busking or 'begging' on the streets and trains without a permit or at places where it's illegal. Some make an awful racket while others are very talented and should promote themselves online.
  • The beggars on benefits. Begging is a career choice for most. Some can earn up to £100.000 a year! One day, I exited a shop and immediately to my left, I saw a homeless female tucking away a wad of banknotes down her knickers. Later that day, that same female asked me if I had any spare change! I felt like saying, "I wish I did have, especially as much change as you have in your knickers".

Why you should not give money to beggars

How can you help someone on benefits who is in genuine need of your help?

The next time someones asks you for your money. Think once, twice, thrice before deciding who is genuinely in need of your help. Are they wearing any gold they could pawn? Do they own any valuable items or collections they could sell? Do they look dishevelled and underweight? Do they look and sound desperate and genuine? Can they look you in the eye and without touching their nose while talking to you? (a sign of lying). Only you can decide who is in desperate need before you part with your hard-earned wages.

Giving someone the benefit of doubt

There are many organisations, such as charities, soup stall kitchens and food banks. There are loan companies and pawnbrokers in business to help anyone in need of emergency finances.

If you want to financially support someone, that's your choice. The chances are, you're fuelling their drug or alcohol habit and supporting their lifestyle. In 2018, 726 homeless people died in the UK. Two in five deaths were from drug poisoning

In your experiences, how common is benefit fraud?

See results

© 2019 Compu-Smart

Comments

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment
    • profile image

      Jake 

      2 months ago

      I was homeless and begged for 9 years. This is the dealeo.

      if you give me money, I’ll use it to get drugs. If you give me food, I’ll sell it for money to get drugs. If you give me a voucher, I’ll sell it to buy drugs. That’s how we rolled.

    • profile image

      Philisophy Geek 

      3 months ago

      A very interesting article. Thanks for sharing.

    working

    This website uses cookies

    As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, hubpages.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

    For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: https://hubpages.com/privacy-policy#gdpr

    Show Details
    Necessary
    HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
    LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
    Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
    AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
    Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
    CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
    Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
    Features
    Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
    Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
    Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
    Marketing
    Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
    Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
    Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
    Statistics
    Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
    ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)
    ClickscoThis is a data management platform studying reader behavior (Privacy Policy)