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CNA Training for Free

Updated on March 5, 2012

Free CNA Training

You could start an entry-level career working in a nursing field by training to become a Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA). A training course will usually cost you a few hundred dollars. However, there are also ways to receive free CNA training. Do not give up hope of training for this career if you cannot pay for training on your own.

You should search for CNA training programs being offered in your area. You should not have trouble finding a few. They are often provided through nursing care facilities and community colleges. Contact the administrator for some of the programs in your area. Talk to the schools to find out if any scholarship opportunities are available. Some training schools and programs have their own scholarships. There will be times when training schools are provided funds by the Department of Health to create scholarships and grants to help increase the number of individuals who can afford to train as nursing assistants.

Free CNA Classes - Free CNA Training

If you are interested in becoming a CNA, you might possibly be able to receive training through a nursing care provider or other type of healthcare facility hiring nursing assistants. Some of these locations will actually hire you before you are certified. They will provide you with or send to receive the training you need to sit for the certification exam. After you are certified, you will work for that company for the amount of time agreed upon when you accepted the terms of your free CNA training.

You can talk to your employer if you are working for a company that hires nursing assistants. They might have a tuition program to help you cover the cost of training if you will then continue working for the company. Even if such a program is not available, the company might pay for your training if they think you would be an asset to their team of certified nursing assistants.

There is the possibility that you could receive free CNA training if you are receiving welfare benefits or if you have a low income. Career training vouchers and other methods of receiving free training are often available to individuals who are not currently earning a sufficient income. The same could be true if you are someone who is receiving unemployment benefits.

You might be eligible to become a Certified Nursing Assistant without attending a training course if you worked as a Nursing Aide in the Military. Contact the Nursing Assistant Registry in your state to find out if this is possible. Sometimes the CNA training can also be waived if you are a nursing student who has already completed certain nursing fundamentals courses if you are a Licensed or Registered Nurse in another state and moving into the state for which you want to work as a CNA.

Opportunities could be available to you if you are already a CNA and looking to further your career. For instance, some charitable organizations and schools offer scholarships for employed nursing assistants who are attending nursing schools. An example of this is the Robert McRae CNA Advancement Scholarship Fund.

How to Become a CNA

Almost any job you choose in the medical field is a wise choice. The demand for healthcare professionals continues to rise, and their services will always be in high demand.

If thinking of getting into the medical field, consider the benefits and satisfaction of becoming a CNA, or Certified Nursing Assistant.

Becoming a CNA is not difficult, but requires work and dedication.

If you are thinking of getting into the medical profession in any way, consider if this career is right for you. To become a successful CNA, you must enjoy working with all different kinds of people, and have a nurturing, compassionate and calming influence on them. If you are patient, compassionate and good with people, then these traits are a good foundation for you to build a career as a certified nursing assistant.

A CNA is not a nurse, but usually works under the direction of a registered nurse or other advanced medical professional.

A CNA position requires a high school diploma or GED and specialized training, which we will talk about in a bit.

Becoming a CNA is rewarding, both financially and from the satisfaction you get by providing a much-needed service to patients.

CNA Training Program

To begin your training to become a CNA, you must be 18 years of age, possess a high school diploma or GED, pass both a background check and a drug test.

The training varies by state, so check the requirements for your state or province for specific requirements.

In general, a training course is always mandatory. Training can be completed at a local community college or the Red Cross. The training offered here takes longer, but may be more thorough in covering required material needed to pass the final exam.

You may also see advertisements for "free CNA training" by local nursing homes or healthcare facilities. These types of situations will usually require you to work for that particular agency for a certain period of time in exchange for your free training, and by working at it full time, you may complete your training within 2-6 weeks.

When looking into training facilities, remember that this position is usually known as a certified nursing assistant or CNA, but may also be referred to as a nursing aide, nursing assistant or patient care technician, among other titles.

After your training is complete, you must pass the NNAAP (National Nurse Aide Assessment Program) test, administered by an examiner from your state. The final exam is both in written format and a clinical portion, where basic nursing skills are performed and observed/graded. The written exam will test you on a number of things such as human anatomy/biology, medical terminology and procedures, and knowledge of issues related to healthcare professions.

How Long is CNA Training?

By enrolling in an accredited CNA training program, you can expect your training to last for approximately 6 months. It may vary by state, but 6 months is the average length on training. The cost can range from $300 to $600, but by checking into possible scholarships and other programs to offset the training costs, this career is well worth the investment.

CNA training will cover the basic care of patients, nutrition, safety practices, administering basic first aid and CPR.

To pass the final exam in order to become certified, there will be both a written and clinical portion of the test.

The written portion will cover basic, common sense types of things, but it is a good idea to do a thorough review of your notes and all study guides prior to taking the written test.

For the clinical portion, the examiner will be grading you on such things as basic caregiving and safety skills. Things like locking a wheelchair in place and properly securing bed rails. Making the patient feel comfortable and also remembering to keep their dignity a #1 priority by always knocking and keeping them covered as much as possible. Also keeping your good hygiene in the forefront by using gloves or masks when handling bodily fluids and washing your hands frequently.

All of these things will be covered in depth within about 6 months of quality CNA training. A final exam will be scheduled with an examiner from the state once all required training has been successfully completed.

CNA - Certified Nursing Assistant

Job Description

The primary job duties of a CNA are to care for, monitor and administer treatment to patients based on their individual needs.

Duties can range from -

Maintaining hygiene by helping the patients to shave, bathe, groom and help dress

Assisting the patient with exercising, walking or general movements

Housekeeping to maintain clean and healthy environment

Feeding, providing beverages

May check vital signs such as temperature, weight, blood pressure, pulse

Provide support for patient needs; good rapport and upbeat disposition

Works under supervision of RN or doctor

The duties are varied and critical to the health and well-being of the patient.

Certified Nursing Assistant Salary

The average salary for a CNA ranges from $25,000 to $30,000, with the median average coming in at around $29,000.

According to the United States Bureau of Labor statistics (2008-2018 data), the average CNA wages varied from $8.23 to $15.97 per hour.

Also according to this data, CNA jobs are expected to increase by more than 18% from now until at least 2018. This data indicates that there will be an increase in available CNA jobs in the future, which makes this an excellent career choice today.

Working as a CNA gives you a starting place in the medical field. While you may enjoy your responsibilities as a CNA and wish to make this a lifelong career, it also will allow you to gain valuable field experience should you wish to continue and go on to become an LPN or RN.

CNA Free Training

Summary

For an excellent career in the medical field, employment as a CNA is both personally and financially rewarding.

CNA training can be obtained for free or very low costs by scholarships, internships and other sponsored programs. Research is the key when looking for options to offset the training costs of obtaining CNA certification.

Once certification is obtained, there are many job opportunities available for the CNA.

Employment can be found at hospitals, nursing homes, hospices, home health care agencies and more. Checking employment opportunities posted at local hospitals and healthcare facilities is a great way to learn of a job, in addition to networking with other health care professionals.

With a current shortage reported in quality nursing assistants, there is no better time than now to secure your future in the medical field as a CNA.

Jump into your healthcare career as a CNA

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