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The Truth About Being a CNA

Updated on January 18, 2014

Certified Nursing Assistant---Good Move?

Yes and No.

Before I broke down and filled out my application for CNA training, I had no desire to be a CNA. My mother worked as a CNA for much of my life and I never thought I could ever do it. My major reservation about going into it was seeing the private parts of grown people--not to mention, being in direct contact with their poopie doop.

So why did I do it? Well, i was in school at the time and working as a "helper" in the nursing home where my mom worked, passing out snacks and pushing residents here and there. At this point I had done this for 2 years and I was tired of it. I wanted to quit, but I don't have the personality, connections, or whatever it takes to land a job at Target or Walmart.

I'd love to say that I registered for the CNA training because I have a huge heart and wanted to take care of people, but no. I needed to escape and I wanted to make a little more money. And being that I couldn't get a job in the grocery store, I had to bite the bullet and earn a skill set so that I could work someplace else.

On one hand, I would suggest CNA-ing to someone who needs job security in the moment. The course I took was only 8-10 weeks and places always need CNAs--especially nursing homes because CNAs are always quitting. Another good thing is that if you decide to go to nursing school, you won't have to do the CNA part, which is required with most nursing programs. Also, with certification you are qualified to work in more places. There are a few places I know of that hire PCAs (personal care assistants) without certification, but these people are paid slightly less than CNAs and can't transfer their experience to most other facilities unless they are certified.

Although there are a few good things about this career choice, I would not recommend that anyone go into this without an exit plan. IMO this should not be anyone's last stop. One CNA I worked with had been doing it for 30 years, and I know others who have been doing it for nearly as long. I was in the game for just three years, and I can't imagine sticking around if you can do better in any way.

Now, if you think that this is all you're capable of doing in life, or if you happen to love it (yeah right) then you be the best CNA you can be! (Err...I guess)

It's been 2 years since I've changed a brief (diaper) and if you can't tell already, I still harbor a fair amount of disdain for this type of work. Contempt. Irritation. Much of the rest of this lens will explain why.

The Truth

If you look at the Certified Nursing Assistant page of any career catalog, you'll likely see some version of this picture--an older person sitting with a CNA who is smiling and happy to be there. Your instructors will try to paint a pretty picture and if you don't know anyone who does this, you'll probably be surprised at how much work is involved. Even in the articles you may have come across, supposed CNAs make it seem like the job is wonderful and that they love it. It always annoyed me that no one tells the truth!!! Honestly there are some moments when it's calm and you have the chance to sit and talk with your residents.....and there are those times when some of them express their appreciation for what you do for them, but those times are far and few between.

Where to Work

As you read this, keep in mind that all my 3 years of CNA work took place in nursing homes. Out of all the places you could choose to work, I think nursing homes are the most intense. Where I live nursing homes pay a little more (a $1) than hospitals, who prefer experience (they want experience, but pay less...what sense is that?). From what I hear, hospitals tend to be a little easier to work because the patients are of varying ages and it's more likely that they will be able to do for themselves or have a family member to help them dress, bathe, etc... Also, if a patient doesn't want a bath or any personal care it's not so bad because more than likely they'll go home in a couple days.

CNA Duty

On an average day (morning shift), I would be assigned to a "track" of 6 rooms, which equals 12 residents. If lucky, 2 or 3 of these residents may need minimal to no help with their personal care. That leaves 9 people that need to be bathed,dressed, and (possibly) put into their wheelchairs or recliners BY LUNCH TIME. Of course if someone calls out sick we would have 8-10 rooms.

When in CNA training, you will be taught the proper way to make a bed, give a bed bath, brush someone's teeth, etc. You'll have it all down when you take the practical part of your CNA test. Unfortunately, much of what you learn will go out the window when you hit the floor.

As awful as it sounds, residents in nursing homes don't get the best care possible. It's not that the CNAs are heartless, careless people, but that if they do every single thing "by the book" they'll get very little done. A bed bath, for example. In training they show you the proper way to wash the entire body from head to toe.

I usually only filled a wash basin (some don't even do that) and washed under their arms and torso and washed their bottoms as i changed their brief. If these people can't speak for themselves or if they don't have family members that will come in later and complain, their teeth won't be brushed. Nail care will not be done. I know that's bad, but there are other people that need to be prepped for the day.

And you know what? The beginner CNAs that try to do a perfect job are the ones that other CNAs start to dislike because they have to pick up the slack when lights are going off and the assigned CNA has been in a room forever. Even if you are busy, a nurse will grab you and ask you to take care of a resident you're not even assigned to even if you have your own work to do! Resident family members resent "slow" CNAs, too, because all they know is that it took 30 minutes for the CNA to make it to come get 'mom' bathed and dressed or they are upset that their parent isn't 'up' yet when they come to visit.

After the resident is clean, next step is to dress them. This part isn't so bad unless the person is contracted, really big, or a "fighter" (will explain later).

After the resident is presentable, the next thing to do is to put them in their wheelchairs. The proper way to transfer a resident is to wrap a gait belt around the ones who can stand or to use some sort of mechanical lift (for the heavier ones). I never got the hang of using a gait belt because I rarely used it! Some residents could stand with help, and I would just kind of physically lift or pull the lighter ones that couldn't move into their chairs.

That's one thing about CNA work I disliked: being dependent on other CNAs to help me sometimes. I always helped my fellow CNAs with a smile, but a lot of CNAs can give attitude when you ask them to assist you in lifting someone or helping you change someone. In nursing homes, you are going to have to work with some big residents that can't do anything for themselves...some can't even roll over without your help. It's just frustrating when you have someone dressed and you can't find anyone to help you (because they are busy or because you don't want to ask a certain CNA for help) to change them or transfer them into their chairs.

Mealtime is usually not so bad because after everyone has their food, you can sit and rest a little bit as you feed the "feeders" (residents who need to be fed, of course).

After meal time, it's usually time to lay the residents back down to be changed. Most likely they will want to stay in bed until the dinnertime.

Nursing homes are different as far as resident makeup and patient care supplies. In the last nursing home I worked, most of the residents needed some degree of care but the resident makeup was not dense with people who needed the max amount of care. Out of the whole facility, at any one time, we had about 5 at most who really, really, really required the hoyer lift to be transferred--which is good.. The hoyer lift is useful, but a pain because it takes longer to transfer someone with it than to just underarm them and put them in their chair, but those who need the hoyer lift, really do need it because they are too big. For a minute I worked at another place that had 4 hoyer lift people on one track!!! It seems they accepted any and every body. I hated that place.

As far as supplies go, I worked at two places that made us use towels to clean people. On the one hand, towels are good because we wet them with warm water (as opposed to shocking the resident with a cold adult wipe), but they are unsanitary because if you have to clean up a "mess", the whole towel is going to get nasty and touch the residents' skin again and again. Also, i think the towels are really rough on the skin.

The last place i worked used adult wipes. While they were cold, they were more sanitary (throw away with each wipe or two).

The Residents

Now, that may not sound so bad....and it wouldn't be if all you had to do were steps 1-3 with everyone and go home. This is a people-oriented job and there are lots of personalities to deal with. Including annoying residents.

While you are trying to get your people up and ready, there will be lit call lights to meet you when you exit a room. Call bells serve their purpose and most of the time the residents really do need assistance, but a CNA is only one person. Imagine coming out of a room just to dispose a soiled brief and throw clothes in a hamper and three of your other rooms are lit up and one of the residents is yelling because their light hasn't been answered soon enough. And you still aren't quite finished in the room you just came out of!

The first group of annoying residents are the "Light Sitters". They are known for "staying on the light" and where I worked you'd have one or two patients that fit this description. You could have just fulfilled their last request and they turn the light back on wanting something else. There was one lady that would put her light on nearly every 20 minutes wanting to be changed. We'd check her and she's not wet or her diaper has just been sprinkled.

And then another lady would always turn on her light wanting to be pulled up higher in the bed. She wasn't light enough for one person to do, so whenever her light came on that means her CNA would have to go out and find someone to come and help.

Then another lady used to put on her light for nothing. She'd turn the light on like every five minutes to ask you to move a cushion or to ask what was for dinner.

The second group is the "Fighters" and/or "Mean People". Just as it sounds, fighters are those who try to hit, kick, slap you when you are doing their care. All the "fighters" I've encountered (except one) were not cognitive enough to understand what was truly happening. Fighters tend to be amusing because usually they aren't strong enough to hurt you but they hit and kick you with all they have.

My most memorable "fighter" was this little tiny lady in my last nursing home. Whenever I'd have to change her or dress her, she would beat me up. It was kind of funny because all you could hear from behind the privacy curtain was "Slap! Pap! Slap!" from her smacking my arms, all while Im just turning her back and forth to clean her and put her brief on.

Mean people are worse than fighters because although they may not have "all" of their mind, they have enough of it to try to call you names and degrade you. I've never had the "N" word dropped on me, personally, but I know of residents who have used that word and said equally derogatory things to CNAs. For the most part, I'm not all that much of a sensitive person,but twice, my feelings have been kinda hurt.

One night i went in to a man's room to change his brief and put on his nightgown before going home, and I was nice as I could be....and while i was trying to get his pants off, the cuff of it hurt his foot and he basically cussed me out. Another time I went to get up this lady i wasn't familiar with and I was just trying to get her changed or clothes on and she was being resistant, saying mean things, along with pinching and deliberately trying to hit no matter how sweet i tried to talk to her.

There aren't all that many mean people, but they are the worst because here you are trying to make sure they are clean and not left in a soaking wet brief or poopie bed and they cuss and call you names.

You know? You couldn't pay most people enough to clean adult dook, but here I am to make sure you're dry, clean, and not in filth...which is where you'd be if you were left alone...

Families

Resident families can sometimes be helpful. Sometimes they'll take their family member out on the porch or off site. Some of them will take their elderly loved ones to the bathroom and believe it or not, some will even take it upon themselves to change their parents' briefs. However, this is not common. Most family members are PAINS.

They will turn the call light on to have CNAs come to take "mama" to the bathroom. Or to change "mama's" brief. Or to put "mama" in the chair. Or to lay her back down (which likely will take more than one person to do....and then you may not be able to find someone available to help). And then, half of them will stay in the room to watch you do patient care, which is uncomfortable. I've had family members stay in the room and watch me feed their parent, which I think is ridiculous. I know it's the CNAs job to feed, but family members will usually take their loved ones tray and help them eat, freeing the CNA to feed someone else.

Nurses and Administration

I know that most of you probably think that cleaning adult poop is the worst part of this job. In my opinion, it's not. After the first week, you really get used to it. I got to the point where I could barely even smell it if I was the one doing the patient care. I'd only really smell it in the hallways when someone came out of a room or if the trash barrel was full.

In my opinion, the worst part of the job is the nurses. The best nurses are the ones that have been CNAs before because they understand how the job is. The older nurses didn't have to go through CNA certification when they went through school so they don't have first-hand knowledge of what it is. I had one nurse who would help bathe and dress a couple patients, but you're too lucky if you end up working with one who would do that.

Most of the nurses are so inconsiderate and think it's not in their job description to do this or that. We used to have staff meetings and in every one, it would be mentioned that the nurses are supposed to answer call lights. But will they? No. They'll just want to run the CNA around like maids. One time I witnessed a nurse ask a CNA to fix someone's bedsheets. C'mon. The nurse just came out of the room and he couldn't simply pull the sheet over the lady's feet? Another time I heard a resident ask a nurse to hand her a remote control.....and do you know this nurse came out of the room and waited on a CNA to exit another room to ask her to see what the resident wanted? This other time, a nurse asked a CNA to go to a room just to put someone's socks on. ABSURD!

I've had my own personal experiences like this. It was nearly afternoon and I was still in the process of getting all 1250 of my residents up and a nurse came out of a room and yelled to me that a patient needed to be put on a bedpan. She had just come out of the room! You mean, she couldn't have taken a minute to put the lady on the bedpan, seeing that Im struggling to get everyone bathed, dressed, and beds made? And another time, this same nurse called me down to a room, not even on my track, to change this lady whose family was present. Considering this wasn't my room and also that this resident was really big, I thought that this nurse would stay and at least hold her to the side so I could change her, but she just left! I was so POd about that.

Nurses really got on my nerves because most of them are such HYPOCRITES! In the meetings, they claim to love the residents so much and that they want to help us the best they can to give these patients the best care. I only came across one nurse who was true to that (the one I mentioned earlier). She would clip fingernails, feed, make beds where she could...(and still manage to have her meds passed) she's the awesome-est nurse!

It's not that I expected nurses to do our job for us, I just wish that they would have some consideration and respect for CNAs. If I'm in a room and my lights are going off, can't you see what they want and help if you can? Would you want your mother to sit in her room waiting 45 minutes to be put to bed or to be handed an item from across the room? .....and you supposedly care about these people so much like they're you're family. All the nurses want to do is hurry and pass out their medicines so they can sit down behind the nurse station. That's really the life goal of most of them.

Administration was terrible too because they had an idea about how the place should run...and there's ideally....then reality. For example, the residents are supposed to be turned to their opposite side every two hours (to prevent bedsores). HA! Every once in a while, they'd put these colored discs under some patients that you were supposed to turn in to the nurse when you found it. . There is no way one CNA can keep up with turning people every two hours with all the work that has to be done.

Another time a male resident on my track was complaining because he wanted a shower. It wasn't his shower day and the reason why no one could get to it is because we couldn't leave him unattended in the shower room and this man took a literal 30-45 minutes in the shower. He went and told the administrator (who isn't a nurse or CNA) and she came to our wing and said that someone had to do it. He was on my track so that meant me. What was supposed to happen to my other residents who needed to be changed and put to bed after lunch? Because the nurses surely weren't going to help out and answer their lights while Im stuck in the shower with this guy.

Blood Pressure Cuffs

As a CNA, you may be required to take vital signs. Your wing may have a set or two of vital sign equipment for the wing you are working on. One thing that I found so useful is an automatic blood pressure cuff. I'm not talking about the ones you pump--I mean the kind that you put on the residents' wrist. It reads blood pressure and pulse. Some peoples' arms are really big and it's hard to get a blood pressure measure with a manual cuff because the velcro will keep popping open. The wrist BP cuff will fit around any wrist (and if not, OMG!) and take about 30 seconds to read. Be careful because some nurses don't like CNAs to use them (another way to make your life hard), saying that they aren't accurate. I say, hide one in your pocket and just make sure the nurse doesn't catch you using it.

And you would think that a nurse would do his/her own vital signs to ensure that the values are correct instead of depending on busy CNAs who can barely squeeze in the time to get them done.

In Conclusion

The purpose of this lens is not to scare anyone out of being a CNA. I just wanted to shed some light on the reality of the job because, like I said, everywhere you see CNAs described, they make it seem like it's such an enjoyable profession, like you are going to love it. Like you're going to be sitting around laughing and reminiscing with sweet old people all day.

In the midst of all the busyness and BS, there are good times. Some of the older people are sweet and understanding and will try to help you the best they can. It's so sweet when you get that rare one that is so grateful for what you do to help them. Every once in a while, some of the resident family members will bring in gifts or food for the CNAs to show their appreciation, and that's really nice.

Despite the negative aspects, I encourage anyone who gets into CNA work not to get discouraged if you have to do it for a while. Your first days on your own can be very depressing when you're new and you're still programmed to do everything by the book.

With some time, you'll get the hang of it. You may feel like a weakling in the beginning but with time, you'll get much stronger. I wouldn't call it a true workout, but after a couple months at my very first CNA job, my arms and back were kind of built. Don't get discouraged the first couple days on your own....you'll probably be slow (trying to do it the way you were taught) but it just takes some time to get a routine.

Still, I don't think anyone loves this job. I don't care what anyone says. Keep in mind that all I know is nursing homes, so maybe it's easier to function in a hospital or hospice setting. Nursing homes are going to be pretty much the same anywhere you go. I think the only way this job would become desirable is if the CNA to patient ratio were reduced. If the CNA only had just 6 people to concentrate on, I think that all the things required of them (mouthcare, full bed baths, nail care) could be easily managed.

But that won't happen because it's all about money and the corporations don't want to pay to staff the nursing homes with more CNAs.

Agree? Disagree? Change of Heart?

So...What do You Think?

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      Rachel 5 weeks ago

      22 yrs of being a CNA, every thing she said is true I have worked in 3 separate nursing homes I started out being told by instructor it's a good job.. Nope!! I'm tired of working short,lazy nurses , no supplies, disrespectful families and patients, I just quit a job I worked at for 12hrs to "sit"with elderly man I'm so so much happier I will never work n a nursing home again it's pure HELL for little pay!

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      Mrs. Jones 10 months ago

      Ibe been an aid for eight years now(way too long) everything this young lady had mention is very true...but I do want to stress how fast your body will go down hill...yea your instructed to use your body mechanics but its NOT easy when residents grasp on to you or is too lazy to help themselves...please dont settle this job to support you until you retire...let this job be a stepping stone

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      Justin 14 months ago

      Great article. My gf is great with people. She complains of being on her feet all day and being harassed by a couple nurses. Way overworked , little pay. She came home and said she's tired of feeling like a "doormat." I am a little bias but she is one of the most caring people out there. They leave her alone on a floor which tech its not legal. She is a LNA. I read this article it and it explains A LOT of what she tells me daily after just one year. Its hard to watch because she put so much effort into this and wanted to be a LPN.

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      anonymous 17 months ago

      There is a high probability that many of us will reach the stage defined as "elderly". We may suffer from dementia, lose control of our bowel and bladder functioning, lose the ability to feed ourselves, suffer from depression, feel lonely and helpless. Who will we depend on the respect our dignity and want to provide the care and compassion and treat us as the individual human being that we are in a state of having suffered so much loss as we have grown old. It is so easy to talk the way that I have read previous to submitting this response. However, the day we are on the receiving end of needed care that we can't take care of, independently, what will we say, then. It is up to each individual making the decision to become a caregiver, to be determined to give quality of life to one person at a time. The care a CNA is responsible to provide should be done with integrity and responsible accountability. Most of all, though, empathy. Profanity and self centered perspective is the theme of what I have read here. I have worked with the best CNA's, I could say, in the world and I am thankful. They demonstrate professionalism and true care for the residents they grow to love. It is not an easy profession by any means, but we work together to do the best that we can to provide quality to the sacred lives of the people we serve.

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      veterancna 18 months ago

      I worked at a place with a bunch of old Mexican CNAs that had been there for way to long, we only had 2 lifts that worked for 59 residents, old Mexican CNAs would hide the slings and hog the machines, I was squatting 200 pound mother fuckers from their chairs to their bed. Shit gets real out there! Especially in ghetto facilities, wash clothes were a luxury, you usually got 20 wash clothes for your 10 assigned residents, you run out of them, you go grab a shirt or a sock, pretty much anything soft you can wipe an ass with. I loved working with my residents, I really truly did, but I would never work at a place like that again! Places like that make you do some ghetto shit, and you better keep hush hush because you'll be the first one thrown under the bus if you report and shit hits the fan! I left that place after two years, I work at a really nice hospital now, it was def a shock at what a different work environment it is. No more wiping ass with socks!

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      anonymous 21 months ago

      this is the most negative and awful article i have ever read. It is the nature of the job so deal with it, if you dont like it then become a greeter at wal mart. just say hi and bye to people

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      Milla 22 months ago

      I agree with everything what was said. They should pay the same salary as they pay nurses for this kind of job. Then CNA's will be willing to do this work with a smile on the face. And they will be able to take care of their bodies so that they can continue this hard work. Otherwise no sense to damage your body for nothing so that in 7-10 years have one surgery after another.

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      new york city 2 years ago

      This job should only be for the RN they are the ones that make the big$$$$ & the ones with the registeted lisence. Due to 12 yrs of CNA i lost a tendon on my rt elbow and i am having a second surgery due to rotator cuff tear and tendon on my shoulder. Nurses inly wants to give meds they dont want to deal with the rest and their careers includes it all. I dont recommend anyone to be a CNA. You will regret it when you hurt yourself by lifting patients.

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      MsOptimistic 2 years ago

      If you CNAs want some great advice please read this. First off I totally agree with this blog. I found it kinda therapeutic. I'm gonna try to be brief about my experience. So I was 22, working at a restaurant, thinking I still haven't done too much with my life. I attended two colleges for for growth. I had some FUN retail jobs, and being a photographer had such a good time working at acouple studios, but there's not real $ there unless you are freelance and can market yourself well. I was living in a small town and thought of going into CNA school for growth. I had no intentions of working as one. The class lectures and my classmates were a blast. The clinicals were a nightmare! A classmate had told me after graduation she was enrolling into CNA2 school. That's what I did. Well the CNa2 instructor doesn't wanna tell you hospital and clinic jobs are hard to come by. After graduation I had this mind set I'd get hired. Nooooope! I learned after months of trying to get one of those jobs I'd HAVE to gain CNA1 experience. Oh and not all states require CNA2 license to work in a hospital or clinic, but my state does. I landed a job at a rehabilitation center. This is no lie...I loved it in the beg. Doing more medical work, helping PTs and OTs, but I've got to be realistic...I'm a very pretty girl. Most of the girls I worked work didn't like that. This facility was part rehab and part nursing home. Even though I know I was an excellent employee, depending who worked determined how my day would go. Some of the more experienced CNAs thought they were gods gift, and since I didn't buy the nurses "LPN" coffee I was not on their good side. Luckily my workplace was union and I was payed very well and wasn't fired. I provided great care. It was the nursing stuff..I refused to let them treat me like a maid or disrespect me. One CNA flat out implied I was her bitch and I was to do what she told me to. Hahah yeah that didn't happen. We had to both go into a patients room for care and she yelled at me cussing and I told her to take it out in the hall. It was brought to the attention of the Administration. Do u know what they said? That is was a misunderstanding. I could go on and go on. After enough experience (a little more than 6 months) I landed a job at a great hospital. There are dozens of different areas in a hospital. If u don't wanna work in a nursing type hospital unit then stay away from places like "gen med, med/serg" etc. I landed the best job in a specialized unit..where..guess what?! The nurses treated me with respect! At least 90% of the nurses were amazing! Never looked down on me and was considerate of my time. I seriously can go on. Plus I got paid even more there. Also if I stayed additional hours after 12hrs I was making $25 an hour and would get a free meal. List goes on. I now have a much better understanding of who I am and what I wanna do in life. Working at the hospital I learned about different healthcare careers I never knew about. The schooling, pay, etc. I am now enrolled enrolled in phlebotomy school to gain more skills. I'm going to be a MA. I can't say for how long, but I know I'll be happy. I love helping ppl and being the backbone. Even in friendships. I'll get to use my brain, and have a different kind of patient care. I really can't say whether or not I'd do it again, but I do know I've grown a lot and I'm now on a path to where I should be. Also I'll be working a part time dealing with one patient. Ill be doing PT therapies, RT therapies, trach care, gtube care, and other MEDICAl stuff. That'll be amazing for my résumé. So people there ARE "loopholes" to being a CNA. Just stay strong and know you won't always be unhappy. Never stay at a job that makes you feel lower then others. One thing I didn't mention was at the rehab facility., my spirit was broken. I'd sometimes come home and cry. For those wondering I stated this work in 2013, and I am in an amazing spot in my career. I just didn't give up.

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      mary 2 years ago

      My first class starts today but i have change my mind about being a cna. I lost my job cleaning job of 24 year and thought a cna was a change but with arthritis their is no way i could keep up that pace.

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      Gravity 2 years ago

      This was a 100% therapeutic read. Every bit of it (as well as the complaints of many of the commenters) was horribly accurate with Nurses, fellow staff and esp. Administration standing at the top of the worst parts of it. Doing this job made me realize I do care for people more than I thought I did and genuinely do want to make their days better. The good ones. However, I truly can't see myself in this field for too long. I'll do what I can for now but I do aim to empower myself and branch out asap. This field is a tortuous mess.

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      LWheart 2 years ago

      Thank you so much for your 100% accurate and on point description. This is the epitome of my current CNA. It made my day to see my exact perspective written for all to see. It was like reading my personal soapbox. Loved it!

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      crazyhorse 2 years ago

      I will agree with all cna's above, this is not a good career to be in period. Nothing will ever change unless you change it yourself. We are dealing with people's lives and the pay, abuse, emotional well being simply is not worth it. There is only one way things will get better for cna's a shortage of cna's but classes for nurse-aide training is constant. Or perhaps a low unemployment rate with new industries abounding like the 1990s. Then health care would pay cna's more money and with respect because they are hard to come by. Until the economy gets better or you go to school or start a business or change career's you're left with this line of work. Life is short do that which makes you happy. Don't ever give up on your dreams but make your dreams reality.

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      anonymous 2 years ago

      20 years doing some form of cna work. All this is the ugly truth in ALL areas of care. I liked Hospice the best because I was able to give one on one care and give the patients the respect they deserved. Why did I stay so long? Because I was a single mom who dropped out of college to raise a family. I didn't have the luxury of time or money to go back to school and my pay rate was higher with my experience than I could receive anywhere else. Now I am a very physically fit person who hurt her back and will probably have to change my career. I love helping people, hate nursing now. No retirement no real advancement many places only offer wage increases for up to 3 years. If you want to do this job because you love helping people and are going to be in it for a while do Hospice or home care otherwise you cannot get through the h*** that this job is without loving people. You will be the aide we hate and you will not be able to refrain yourself from following through on the daydream of smearing poopy diapers on bad nurses vehicles. Some nurses are consistently awesome but a lot of them burnout too, they also have to carry the weight of their lazy coworkers and eventually become the one unable to hear call lights or figure out how to pour a glass of water. Many CNAs are single parents with kids that get sick and you get call in s - whenever you are hired and given a number of how many patients you will have, double it. That's closer to the truth. If you still can do this job with a smile for the patients who need you then I send to you a huge hug. These patients were once strong people with hopes and dreams and it is horrible that we aren't able to give them the respect they earned (even the mean ones have stories and sometimes when you hear them after they've bitten, punched and slapped you, sometimes you feel less angry). My favorite saying to people who claim their job sucks is to say "pick the person who was the worst to deal with and imagine after how horrible they were to you that you have to smile and wipe poop off their butt" that's our job sometimes you also need that third arm to stop them from putting their hand in the poop and causing you to change the bed and yourself.

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      Shalonda 2 years ago

      Omg u really broke it ALLL the way down. I been an Stna for 10 years and EVERYTHING U R SAYING IS SO SO TRUE U TOUCHED ON EVERY AREA AND ASPECT OF STNA WORK WOW. I am currently in nursing school and when I am finished I will always treat my stnas with the utmost respect because I know how hard it is and the work is physically ABUSIVE to your body and MENTALLY draining. The most rewarding part is when the patients express their appreciation for you and the work you do. Other than that it's tough. I would recommend that anyone becoming an stna should do it temporarily and have plans of going to school because the physical part is so hard on your body and many stnas end up having injuries and bad backs. Doing this work long term can have some crippling effects on your body.

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      Cat 2 years ago

      Thank you for posting this. This is the most accurate description of being a CNA that I have ever read, anywhere.

      However, I will say this - I was a CNA, got promoted to management (scheduling) and took the pay cut to go back to being a CNA after three years because I love it... pain and all. It's that one special resident I get once in a while that makes it worth it to me. I have one now and I love her... and I know I won't leave to go to a different nursing home until she passes away - I'll be there for her til the end.

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      Beth 2 years ago

      We have a "fighter" where I work and unfortunately he IS strong. He's a three person change because he's punch, kick, and slap. He'll also hold onto bed bars, our walkies, or anything that will make sure we can't roll him.

      We also have a "lighter" She will press her button while we are in her ROOM. It's very annoying.

      We only have three hoyer lifts in our building, but the part that sucks worse than the hoyers are the residents that actually need a hoyer but don't have one. It's frustrating having to get other people to help you, especially when you need two or three people to get one resident in bed.

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      meeee 2 years ago

      everything you said about nursing home. I agree 100%..spot on... so all nursing home are the same...i do this job because i love to help people but sometimes it breaks my heart knowing that most residents don't get the care we learned by the book...i do agree that 6 resident for 1 cna would be good. most residents like it when we take time to talk to them when we find time..it is sad that nursing homes would not staff enough cna's...we do a lot from the time we arrive until the end of the shift.sometimes i wish i could have 2 set of hands. I still want to care for people. i might consider hospital or home care in the future.....

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      stressed out 2 years ago

      Worse job I ever had..the pay is awful and the residents expect you to do everything....the nurses won't help you at all...don't do it...it's not worth your time..I'm doing it now because I don't have a choice. .but believe me I'm currently job searching. ...I wouldn't recommend this type of job to nobody. .unless they up the pay. .for what we have to do..we should start in making 12.00-13.00 dollars a hour...but u don't. .that's why I say it's not worth it

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      un named 2 years ago

      I fully agree to this, I work in a nursing home where 52 residents live, we are in charge or taking care of all of them, we do not have assigned rooms. we do not get breaks, and we get paid less than the hospital CNAs do. I make 9.00 and hour not saying that I complain, but it kind of sucks, do to the fact we don't get to use lifts that often and I am 27 weeks pregnant. have been doing this job 3 years and was told if I got put on bed rest or weight restrictions I would be fired.. I am sorry, I am pregnant but my baby is more important than my job. this article is 100% on the dot. it is unfortunate that us CNAs have to deal with this and feel this way. I love the residents, just not the BS that comes with the job..

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      Human Resource Adm 3 years ago

      Might be time for a lateral career change. Some CNA's are finding switching over to EEG or EKG tech's a better way to stay in the health field but without a lot of the hassle and underappreciation that CNA's go through. If you are looking for a healthcare career change you might look into this EEG Technician Online Training Program, http://www.proprofs.com/training/course/?title=MjA...

      Hope this helps, Good Luck!

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      NehveF 3 years ago

      @anonymous: Like any other job, some people just get stuck doing it. If anyone here just up and quits, how are they going to support themselves?

      I was fortunate to get out quick, but not everyone is able to so easily.

      I hope/wish it were better, but unfortunately most of CNA work is depressing in my opinion. And like I said maybe it could be good if the nurses really cared about patients more than giving them pills and sitting down.....OR if they reduced the CNA:resident ratio so that one CNA could actually have the time to provide the best care.

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      NehveF 3 years ago

      @anonymous: I know it's been a year....hopefully you're past the CNA phase. Glad to help.

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      NehveF 3 years ago

      @anonymous: Thank you!

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      I literally started my CNA job Tuesday! I took a 3 year long CNA course through my Tech High School, which was nice! Free and everything! I actually like it, I am slow and sore. But I am starting to get the hang of it! I work on the dementia unit, so I have already been bit, hit, scratched, kicked, pooped thrown at me, and everything! There has been old lady fights, people running around naked, it's been insane! It is not unicorns and butterflies. I am kinda flattered though, because the nurse told me a few of the residents only will let CNAs do work on them if I am there because I make them happy, and it's only my 3rd day! I am basically enjoying it. I hope to get better soon!

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      Perfect description of the job! I've been a CNA for about 4 years, nursing home and hospital, the hospital is much easier, less patients and not a lot of lifting because,like you said, people can walk and do for themselves, also, nurses in the hospital are WONDERFUL compared to a nursing home. The first time a nurse walked up to me and said "so and so was ready for their bath, so I got them washed up and put them in the chair" my jaw hit the floor!! NEVER had a nurse done something like that for me at the nursing home!! But the hospital has negative things about it also, even though I may only have 6-8 patients sometimes, I still can't get my work done because I am sent away from my floor all the time!! No one thinks an aide is every busy, nurses, radiology, neurology, recovery room, o.r., every department in the place thinks you have all the time in the world to drop what you're doing and run to pick up a patient that was getting tests done, or run to pharmacy to pick up a med or blood, or ICU not only wants to dump their patients onto your floor, but they want you to come get them! It's very annoying! I've had patients soak their bed before because I couldn't get to their room to change them due to being sent all over the hospital, and anyone who is a cna knows, if you can't get to their room to change them, they don't get changed cause no one will do it for you! Even though you're off doing something they could have or should have done themselves. I once had a patient who was having a heart attack and needed transferred to ICU, which means he should have been in his bed, hooked to a monitor, with a nurse by his side while being transferred to another floor, nope, nurses don't transfer patients, that's an "aides job", so they had me put him in a wheelchair and take him Down by myself, thank goodness the man was okay, because he wasn't being monitored until he got to the other floor. Ohhhh my could I go on and on about being a cna! I wouldn't recommend it, I'm getting out as soon as possible! We are underpaid for the work we do! We may not have a 4yr degree, but we deserve a lot more! Because we do the most work! And we have to deal with annoying families, demanding nurses, and mandatory overtime, something I forgot to mention, the nursing home I worked in was allowed to make us work a double (16hours) every other day! If we said no, we got fired, it wasn't an option, if you chose to be wrote up, which after so many you'd get fired, then you could say no, but that was the only way. No one knows what our workload is like until they do it themselves, I'd like to take someone from administration and put them on the floor as a cna for a couple of weeks, bet they'd be giving the CNAs a raise after that experience!

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      @erikamarkmeyerhoffer: I find myself in a constant state of uncertainty. As I swore I would never go back to a snf or even assisted living. However working in home health the hours are very unpredicatble and you might not work for 2-3 weeks. After waiting for a job/client I have to work 24 hour shifts and the first 24hrs the client cancelled service. I had to wait another week before I got a new client the pay is 135.00 and only guaranteed 5 hrs sleep a night. I want to get my teaching credential or a computer degree to work in an office.

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      @anonymous: I totally agree with everything you have said. And right or wrong working as a cna for two year in a sniff and now in home care I let my clients know how lucky they are to be living at home and the realities they would face in a sniff. I also was fired after reporting multilpe cnas for neglecting and abuses to residents to the DON and even other cnas who reported me to the DON. I just have to say you are lucky you did not get fired for doing the right thing. I also worked for another facility and again was a whistlblower and went to the DON for explanations. Although they did not fire me I was berated weekly in the managers office and ostercised by the staff until I quit.

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      I have been a CNA for two years now. I would not advise anyone to get into this field unless you are planning something else in the near future. The pay is low, work is hard. On top of the personal care, aides get stuck with laundry, cleaning, and taking orders for people in the lunch room. After a few stints in ALFs I decided to try home health. It is a lot better, but you need a good car, and the hours are unpredictable. Really can't be done unless you have some financial support from a spouse. Still again, the money is not good and a lot of the time you are just a maid, but with responsibilities. This will most likely be my last year, as the economy has made the CNA pay scale plummet. So goes it for trying to care for the elderly. Can't take care of others, when you don't make enough to care for yourself.

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      Im currently in SRNA school. I have a question for you guys....If being a CNA is sooooooooooooo BAD.....why do you guys still work as one? So of you all are like "Ive been a CNA for 15 years!!" obviously its not THAT BAD or you wouldve been gone a long time ago. Every job has its cons...but there must be something good about it if stay working as a CNA....just don't discourage anyone. No one put a gun to your head and MADE you become a CNA....If you decide to tell the bad things....tell the good things as well. that's all i ask!

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      @anonymous: Hello

      I just earned my certificte last month. As an intern, this is exactly what I saw. Not one nurse tried to lift a finger to help out a cna. If a patient asked me to.ask a nurse a question, the nurse would look.at me like I did something wrong. Thenursesdidnt talk to anyone expect other nurses. Our teacher finally told me not go directly to a nurse. It is disgusting that cnas are doing all this work for less than $20 an hour to be treated the way they treated while the nurses sit on their narrow behinds unless they are looking for cnas. The call lights would blinking and ringing for half an hour with six nurses starring down a computer screen. Don't quit.. MOVE UP to get your LPN or RN creditials to show people what a REAL nurse is.

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      Wow. Every single thing you have said is TRUE! (my experience) I've been a Cna for 3 years. My first year was pretty easy. I worked in a nursing home with a bout 8-12 residents and half were independent. People thought I was crazy when I said I loved my job lol. After my first year that cheap ass nursing home cut the amount of Cnas per shift. I then had 20 people to take care of by myself. I was pissed. The lousy ass nurses would sit there as the call lights go off and finally walk around the WHOLE building to find the cna. One time a wheelchair bound woman was trying to get to her room but could hardley roll herself... Not knowing this at the time but the nurse walked up and down the hallway ( obviously looking for the womans Cna) to take the lady to her room. I was pissed. You mean to tell me your stupid lazy a** couldn't take this woman to her room? All that time she spent looking for the cna, could have easily been spent bringing the lady to her room. I ended up quitting that nursing home a few moths later because of a resident who intentionally tried to get me/others fired. They totally took her side when I was nothing but Kind to her. Spending 45 minutes at a time helping her when I had so much more to do. Nothing I ever did was good enough. I would go home every da angry and confused. Why would someone want to be that mean to me if I'm doing everything to please them? She's just old and BITTER!!! People who aren't Cnas can never see it from our point of views. Even with that situation everyone on the outside said I had to be doing the woman something for her to try to get me fired. WRONG!!!! I was so miserable in that nursing home having 20 residents having to give 10 of them baths daily. Breakfast, lunch, & Dinner was my only "break time" as I sat and fed people. Whenever a cna sat down to rest a bit, we got yelled at by the Don's or anyone else who wasn't an Ass whipper! Ok so I ended up getting another job at a diff Nuring home thinking it would be much better because it's a diff Facility! Boy was I wrong. I still have 20 residents and don't have time to take breaks. During my eight hours I only have time to get a drink and snack from the Vending machine. I'm seriously thing about quitting and never looking back. Everyday that I have to work I feel extremely sad that I have to go. Well that's my experience. Don't get me wrong I came into the field because I LOVE helping people, but there is NO WAY IN HELL that I can help 20 people in 8 hours the right way.

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      Wow. Every single thing you have said is TRUE! (my experience) I've been a Cna for 3 years. My first year was pretty easy. I worked in a nursing home with a bout 8-12 residents and half were independent. People thought I was crazy when I said I loved my job lol. After my first year that cheap ass nursing home cut the amount of Cnas per shift. I then had 20 people to take care of by myself. I was pissed. The lousy ass nurses would sit there as the call lights go off and finally walk around the WHOLE building to find the cna. One time a wheelchair bound woman was trying to get to her room but could hardley roll herself... Not knowing this at the time but the nurse walked up and down the hallway ( obviously looking for the womans Cna) to take the lady to her room. I was pissed. You mean to tell me your stupid lazy a** couldn't take this woman to her room? All that time she spent looking for the cna, could have easily been spent bringing the lady to her room. I ended up quitting that nursing home a few moths later because of a resident who intentionally tried to get me/others fired. They totally took her side when I was nothing but Kind to her. Spending 45 minutes at a time helping her when I had so much more to do. Nothing I ever did was good enough. I would go home every da angry and confused. Why would someone want to be that mean to me if I'm doing everything to please them? She's just old and BITTER!!! People who aren't Cnas can never see it from our point of views. Even with that situation everyone on the outside said I had to be doing the woman something for her to try to get me fired. WRONG!!!! I was so miserable in that nursing home having 20 residents having to give 10 of them baths daily. Breakfast, lunch, & Dinner was my only "break time" as I sat and fed people. Whenever a cna sat down to rest a bit, we got yelled at by the Don's or anyone else who wasn't an Ass whipper! Ok so I ended up getting another job at a diff Nuring home thinking it would be much better because it's a diff Facility! Boy was I wrong. I still have 20 residents and don't have time to take breaks. During my eight hours I only have time to get a drink and snack from the Vending machine. I'm seriously thing about quitting and never looking back. Everyday that I have to work I feel extremely sad that I have to go. Well that's my experience. Don't get me wrong I came into the field because I LOVE helping people, but there is NO WAY IN HELL that I can help 20 people in 8 hours the right way.

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      @anonymous: I was a flight attenant for 30 years. I dealt with poop and vomit, every age group with every problem. We had very long duty days; its the nature of the work, bite the bullet or get out. You have all day to perform your jobs, we did not. Nevertheless, we attended to everyone. I recognize that you must spend extended time dressing/transferring/turning etc but we had 6, 7 or 8 flight attendants for 400 give or take, passengers. do the math. my point is, we did out jobs correctly. I encounter cna's at my mother's facility that don't brush teeth (that is a job task), that don't toilet often enough, have put her clothes on backwards, who continue to put the roommates soiled clothes in my mother's laundry basket despite the notes posted everywhere. Worst. My mother was mobile and continent when she went to the NH. They threw her in a wheelchair to make it easy on themselves. Mom would attempt to stand up from the wheel chair. to stop this they put her against a wall and pushed a table up against the front of the wheel chair. mom has strength and she would push the table away to escape the confines. one cna boasted about his solution to this problem. mom was pinned against the wall, then two, not one, tables were shoved up against her, then an immobile wheelchair bound resident was pushed up against the two tables. this is abuse folks. the nurses, administators saw this and no one reported despite being mandated to do so. this is criminal. training to be a cna is so poor. I have a masters in clinical psychology and just passed, without training, the cna certification practice exam. If you can't do the work get the heck out before you hurt someone spiritually, psychologically or physically.

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      @anonymous: HI, BOY would i like to "get it" with regard to covering up. I am a licensed therapist and my mother is in an nh. I am mandated to report abuse so I am glad when you reported. Someone must protect those that cannot defend, protect or advocate for themselves. Continue to do the right thing in that regard. I don't understand why administrators and DON's cover it up either; wish someone would shed light. The morning nurse for example is suppose to remove one exelon patch and place a new one on my mother. At times, my mother has had as many as 4 patches on her; sometimes 3 or sometimes 2. No one denied that, but it has taken forever to correct. I attempted to notify the don that no one was cleaning mom's teeth. the don stated, oh its part of the bedtime x, y z. I restated. she restated oh its part of...we bantered back and forth. I finally stated, whatever the nighttime xy z is, your staff if not doing it. The cna still doesn't do it. I do it every night. Pathetic. There's more but I won't bore you.

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      @NehveF: Do you really think a nurse would ever do a track once a week ? I know if they had to do that at my job they would leave so fast and have no nurses.

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      FL. CNA Wow I agree with this statement I have been a cna for more than 25 years and things are getting worse in longterm care. I work the 3 to 11 shift on a rehap wing and find myself running from room to room answering lights getting patients changed and up for dinner get vitals for the nurses and then they want me to take smokers outside and watch them smoke it just kills me that they remove me off a busy wing to help people smoke ! After running passing meals the patients yell at you because there food was cold or they didn't get what they ordered for dinner then you have a nurse yelling that someone needs the bed pan and she wants me to stop passing meals and help the patient on the bed pan all the time she is just standing there doing nothing makes no sense . Then you go pick up the trays out of the rooms when they are done for dinner and family members are coming out of the dining rooms demanding that you stop what you are doing to get there mother into bed like they are ther only people that matter there and you can't be rude so you have to stop picking up the trays help them into bed then run back and hurry up get the trays after that the fun starts getting people into bed doing PM care listening to patients they want to be first to get into bed all the time you have no linen to clean the patients taking your time you really don't have to spare lookng for stuff to do your job and go tell the DON and she tells you its your fault there is no linen because all the CNA'S are throwing the linen in the trash or hiding it in the rooms etc REALLY ? When the state comes in there is so much help and linen etc but the minute they leave its all gone no help soap linen etc it's a joke how theses nursing homes run.

      I became a CNA to help people enjoyed the work but sad to say its all about money now patients don't matter and forget the help they have no trouble burning you out because someone new is right there to take your place . I would think twice about becoming a CNA .

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      I have been a CNA 30 years and I love the elderly patients ,But the Nurses has their noses in the air and your nothing but a gofor. you get no respect and it is not a job anyone should do. I took all the LPN prerects and was accepted into LPN school and 2 weeks in school they started telling us how the CNA's will want you to help them ,but that isn't your job, your job is to be their boss. if a CNA can't do their job let them find something they can do. Don't fall for that "your a nurse can't you help me?" that is the main problems Nurses is real Nurses not aides and you do not do aide work anymore. I left class that afternoon and never went back.

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      @anonymous: I don't mean to sound negative, but I am stating the truth in what care homes can be like. Not all are bad, but unfortunately the places I work(ed) can be a bit ridiculous. Even with the group homes they show pictures of clients and caregivers looking so happy together. It is when you start there and look through things that you realize it's not all sunshine and daisies. Sure it's not always that bad, but when you've been working in one for a certain amount of time you start seeing more behaviors and just how stressful it can be. If you work in one, you might see what I mean, unless you are lucky and work in a good one. That's my spiel! I hope that sheds some light as to what even group homes can be like.

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      I worked in a couple of care homes in Oregon where you don't need a CNA license, but you are actually doing CNA type work, and even serving in the dining room like it's a restaurant in certain places. They pay caregivers crap here in Oregon, and I will tell you: the care homes have nowhere near the help that is needed! It is highly unsafe! The group homes have a much much lower number of residents (about 5 in some) yet the work can be stressful: having to take the residents out shopping, out to eat, various outings. You are also responsible for doing PT exercises, following diet guidelines (like a dietician) cooking meals, passing meds, bathroom/care routines, and the most difficult part at times: the behaviors! And some behaviors can be pretty bad. All that for beans for pay! I know it's not all about the money, but you also need to make a living. I made more as a housekeeper! I would say that yes caregiving is stressful. I am actually considering a change of career.

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      Im glad you wrote nothing but the truth because i really want to be a cna and its better to know what you are signing into. The blog was amazing! I had a lot of fun reading it :) thanks a lot for posting

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      This whole article was so my experience during my six week class and short time working at the facility that trained me. I thought I was the only one. From the cnas who were less than willing to help with transfers to the rude nurses. I ended up getting fired because I was "too slow". Thank you so much for posting this!

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      I just started working as a CNA at a local hospital in Tennessee and when I tell you it is totally different from how the book and training shows you ! I just got out of orientation and tomorrow is my first day ; working with someone who I heard is not very helpful a fellow CNA I will have 20 patients by myself and some of them are total care :( I am nervous and I hope I don't mess anything up ! Tomorrow will be 12 hrs of something all new to me ! Nursing is a good field but most are in it for the money cause sometimes it can make you hate your job and like it at the same time ! This story was incredible !

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      I just want to say thank you for posting this incredibly informative article! I am about to start CNA school (I'm planning on getting an RN degree) and I have been very nervous about what to expect. I feel like I have a much more realistic image of what it is like, so thank you!

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      I have been working in longterm care for almost 23 years now as a CNA. Nursing homes will work you to death understaffed no linen or soap when you start your shift you report this to your charge nurse and get no help at all they just stand there and tell you its not there trouble but you have to get people cleaned up ready for dinner and waste all your time looking for things to do your job. Just makes me sick the nursing home charges patients for there care and have nothing in the nursing home for there care and get away with it. Now when the state comes in you will have so much staff you will be tripping over each other . I just wonder how they get away with what goes on day to day in the nursing homes? I reported abuse about another cna mistreating a patient and was made to feel like I was the bad person and the DON will go out of there way to cover it up I just don't get it.

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      erikamarkmeyerhoffer 4 years ago

      What are you doing now for a job? Ifind myself going back to being a cna cause its stable although it isn't my dreamjob

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      I've been a CNA for 12 years now. My experience has been primarily in nursing homes. I've worked in several homes and it's all the same as you described. I've grown desensitized to all these problems (amongst others not listed here) in this field. After a year or two of dealing with these things you just form a I don't care attitude, which is sad. I must say God bless the nurses who help the CNA's and understand we're all there for the same purpose. To help the resident. Nurses that were CNA's do make the best nurses. What's also sad is CNA certificates are so easily obtained now. Here in Florida you can pay $300 for a 1-2 week course, just learn the skills, basics, take the state exam. This makes more CNA's than there is jobs and why pay a CNA with X amount of experience more money when a home can pay a new CNA $8.50 hr with 0 experience? I'm longing for a new career as soon I can figure what that will be. I will also note I'm a male CNA. This can create problems also cause your told by some female CNA's your the man, you can do this and that and while I'm at it I'll do your assignment and mine too. So if your a male expect to always be asked for help cause your the man with endless energy. In the long run your just being used cause when you need help go ask these same females for help and see what they tell you. I'm busy, I'm cramping, pregnant or sore, I'll be there in a minute and they never ever come. Wasting precious time. I've learned to do everything by myself and rely on no one. I no longer help those CNA's that say your the man. I've formed my own line of excuses cause you can't say no when asked to help.

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      OMG. Your story sounds exactly like mine. Im from WA state currently living in GA and while Ive been working in hospitals for the past 5 years I did start out in Nursing homes and it was just as you described. Especially when you talked about the fact that teeth brushing and stuff went out the window unless family members complained! that is so true. I used to take some water and lotion to do certain ladies hair and through some lipstick and eyeshadow on them (which took less than 5 minutes) to make it look like I actually spent time on them because of course I couldn't really stay in their room for 30 minutes getting them bathed and dolled up. Its sad but when you have to get up 10 people for breakfast at 7:30am when you start your shift at 6am you have to cut some corners!

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      @NehveF: I realize how difficult it is being a CNA. Although there are many things you said that may be true There are some things that are not spoken correctly. I have worked with amazing Nurses, I have always loved what I do being in this field. I always love the families and it has a lot to do with intrapersonal skills. I am not begrudging you your emotions nor your opinion because yes there is a lot of truth in what you stated. Nevertheless There are a lot of great aspects in being a CNA The rewards are immence in that a person can find the right routine that puts them in a time frame to manage all their patients, Smile talk and don't complain go to the higher ups and if you truly care about your patients things can be fixed It is just hard to get the ball rolling in the right direction. THERE IS NOTHING LOWLY about being a CNA.. We are actually the back bone of the nursing industry.....And heart is what it takes to be a CNA, as well as Hands on ExperienceI It never fails when trained by the correct person in any working envirnoment.. Thanks for writing the blog thingie.... :()

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      hector-garcia-18294 4 years ago

      @anonymous: Yeah, your going to see a lot of stuff that are not by the book but for the most part they do. Unless your clinical location was really bad lol. The Nursing Homes have improved over the years and they are getting better as time goes on but, your going to find not every facility is perfect and not every CNA does their best at what they do but, it does happen. Bath towels are a must especially if your transporting them from their rooms on a shower chair and don't just cover the front of the resident, drape it around the back side low enough, so that their butt cheeks don't show dangling in the wind, that's a dignity issue also. I don't think you'll run out of bath towels because, the residents don't shower everyday, more like 2 to 3 times a week because it dries their skin out. Also, don't forget the skin lotion your facility should provide you with. As for landing a job, hang in there you will. The holidays are coming and the Directors of Nursing like to have enough CNA's on hand for that reason. Good Luck

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      question- in training they teach us to always use a bath blanket/ always avoid overexposure of the client and so on, as you know, but in clinicals the CNA's we worked under in a nursing home never used bath blankets, they hardly ever closede the privacy curtains and sometimes they would even leave the door half open. Is this typical of most CNAs in nursing homes?

      When you gave a partial bed bath each day did you take the time to go and get a bath blanket or did you just cover the resident with...something else?

      I'm got my license in July, still haven't landed a job yet though I AM trying- so my only experience is from a week of clinicals and what little I saw when my grandmother was in a nursing home over four years ago.

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      i agree i was a nurses aide for 19 years

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      i agree i was a nurses aide for 19 years

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      Excellent blog, very true. I left care work because I was exhausted. They put 9-10 hour days on me and didn't seem to worry about it, or acknowledge that I was doing so much. I started so suffer from physical fatigue and was so tired I got sick. I decided I never, ever wanted to go back.

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      hector-garcia-18294 4 years ago

      @hector-garcia-18294: I just wanted to give props for my RN's and LPN's night shift crew. Awesome to work with. Things are more lay back during the midnight hours but also, we get a lot of new grads and there're great to work with. Nothing like the First job I had working the day shift OMG, It's like day and night, (no punt indented) : ) However, were I'm at now, I do work one day out of the week during the evening hours but still, nothing like the First job. I also tried the morning shift on over-time a few times and it's still great. I prefer the night shift because, I got used to the hours and the type of duties I perform. So really, it's going to depend on the facility management and the type of people your working with, I suppose. Good Luck again

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      agree...thanks ...was enlightened the hard way.

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      I have been a CNA for 4 years now. I started out doing the job wanting to become an RN. It is by far by far the worst job I have ever had! I have been abused by patients as well but the worst part is the nurses, they are horrible. They degrade CNA's just because they can. At least with the residents you can justify because they are not in their right mind but the nurses love the power trip. The bigger surprise to me was the other CNA's. Most of them are 2 faced, back stabbers doing everything they can not to get fired. I recently took a job working with disabled adults, the best job I have ever had. But of course an LPN runs the house and talks to us any way she feels like, she shows out right favortism to a CNA and she lies on her employees. Her favorite CNA lies on us, tells on for everything and causes all kinds of problems. Everyone has left except 2 of us. We are so short of help, we are working 60 hours a week for months now and nobody can figure out why employees won't stay. I was always told at my jobs "you can't keep up with your work" and I always thought that was my fault, now I'm starting to realize that nobody can keep up with the demands of this job.

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      NehveF 4 years ago

      @anonymous: That is very true. I've moved on and I really like my job. My coworkers complain about our working conditions, but I find I have nothing to complain about. After working a nursing home, I know what tired is. I remember where I came from.

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      NehveF 4 years ago

      @NehveF: And also, being unable to do a good job as a CNA has little to do with competence. People looking in from the outside have no idea and think that nursing homes are yuck-holes JUST because CNAs don't care and are half-doing their jobs.

      What most fail to understand is that IF a CNA took the necessary time to do a thorough job as learned in school, your grandparent or loved one would likely not get any personal care at ALL during a shift (because the nurses surely won't get up from behind the nurse station to help) and they probably WOULD be in the bed with a soaking diaper for hours. Why? Because the CNA would be stuck in a room for 45 minutes taking his/her time to do a full thorough bath, applying lotion and clipping fingernails.

      Just do the math. If it takes 45 minutes to do a thorough job for each total care patient (which it did for those who were alert enough to be particular about their care). Multiply that by 10 patients, although you may have more than that assigned to you. That's 7 1/2 hours it would take to accomplish.

      First of all, that's practically a whole shift. And secondly this doesn't include the number of times residents must be changed or the times they turn on call lights for random needs.

      It doesn't include the vital signs you have to get done for your lazy nurses.

      It doesn't include the time you spend trying to find another CNA to help you transfer these big people to wheelchairs or help roll them over to be changed or to pull them higher in bed.

      And it doesn't include the showers some of them have to be given if it's their 'shower day'.

      So if your shift starts at 7AM, how are you supposed to do everything by the book for 10-16 people and have them all dressed and ready for lunch by noon? It just doesn't add up.

      But outsiders don't understand and think that CNAs give lousy care because they want to. People direct their anger at the wrong entities...these patient families need to form collective movements and ask the higher-ups why one CNA has so many residents to care for.

      I'm so glad Im done!

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      NehveF 4 years ago

      @hector-garcia-18294: That sounds totally accurate. The nurses will see that you are BUSY and ask you to tend to some need that is simple! They are so inconsiderate. They should require the nurses to rotate and take a CNA track once a week so that they can be more empathetic the next time they ask a CNA to do something.

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      NehveF 4 years ago

      @anonymous: Yes, one of the nursing homes i worked in tried to staff a couple floaters to just help out. I can't ever really remember it working and I think it's because these CNAs end up getting stuck doing full care when they answer a call light and they aren't available for the assigned CNA. In theory I guess it could work with a better plan.

      We also tried the thing where one CNA takes "A" beds while the other takes "B" but that didn't work so well because when you help your patient, the other person wants something too, and you don't want to tell them "I don't have you, wait on your CNA"

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      NehveF 4 years ago

      @anonymous: And another thing, I think they should include a section on the negatives of CNA work in the course, but it's about money so they probably wouldn't do that. When I was in class, the teacher made it seem like being a CNA was so great and it's such a nice job....but my mom was a CNA. I knew better than that.

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      NehveF 4 years ago

      @ReedRobbins: Thanks!

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      NehveF 4 years ago

      @anonymous: Oh I'm ecstatic about not being a CNA anymore. And for every one of me there are millions more. Nowhere did I say that I didn't wash my residents or that I left them in bed all day.

      I think it's unfortunate that residents don't get the best quality care, but as I said in the lens it's NOT because CNAs are heartless people who don't care about their residents. But you can't do every thing by the letter and get more than three residents 'done'. You really have to blame the corporations who are all about money and think that one CNA per 16 residents is sufficient.

      And that was a frustrating aspect of this type work. I hated having to rush up a resident's care because I had lights going off from other residents who also needed help.

      If you have never been a nursing home CNA, you might not get that.

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      NehveF 4 years ago

      @anonymous: The advantage you have IS that you are so young. You don't have to do this forever. Towels as diapers? Geez that is nasty! And I thought cleaning people with wet cotton towels was bad!

      I think the whole nursing home industry needs to change. If they could just lessen the CNA to resident ratio the people would get better care and the CNAs wouldn't be as overworked.

      And that's a shame that the big bosses get paid all this money but don't care anything about the people. In a couple nursing homes I worked the administrators weren't even nurses or experienced with healthcare.

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      NehveF 4 years ago

      @anonymous: Yes, you can do it!

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      NehveF 4 years ago

      @anonymous: I'm telling the absolute truth about this job because I WORKED it for 3 years. So what do you mean? I don't have to like my job to tell someone the truth about what a day at the job entails. It is what it is.

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      NehveF 4 years ago

      @anonymous: Yep. And it's not that CNAs purposely neglect patient care. It's just impossible to do it all with the way the business (especially nursing homes) is set up. Even if the pay were better, you can't get every single thing done, as much as you try with all the people you're given.

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      NehveF 4 years ago

      @anonymous: I agree. CNAs are the hardest working people in the nursing homes.

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      NehveF 4 years ago

      @anonymous: I know this comment is old. Just realized i had to approve a thousand of them. But I hope you stuck with it if you needed a job. It's do-able but like you said, they advertise it in a very sugar-coated way when it's not like that.

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      NehveF 4 years ago

      @anonymous: ...and they claim to love their residents so much. Would they let their mom wait to be taken to a bathroom. But remember, it's not in their job description to help someone go to the toilet.

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      I have been a cna for 15 years and you are totally right about everything. That is crazy cuz its totally the truth.You get treated horribly by certain family members and I think that is because they do not know how it is to be a cna. Nurses are always horrible, always talking down to us like we are stupid. I would never become a nurse because it seems once they become a nurse they know everything and it gives them a right to put us down.

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      This is beyond correct. I agree with what happens with the nurses also, it gets tough but if you can do this job, then many others will look like a piece of cake.

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      hector-garcia-18294 5 years ago

      I Agree and feel this article is totally true. I currently work the night shift and it's a lot of work but it's great. I don't deal with family, baths, vital signs, meals, I just check and change or reposition. However, instead of 12 or so Resident you get twice that but still, it's not that bad as it sounds. My first job I worked the day shift and that was hell on wheels. Most of it was dealing with the Nursing Staff and fellow CNA's. I may be up to my elbows in shit but, you get Nurses that won't lift a finger to help you out. I may be with a fall risk Resident on the toilet and they expect you to drop whatever your doing and take somebody's vitals or something less critical, when they can easily do it themselves. Sometimes you need assistants from your fellow CNA's and you find they aren't around or goofing off watching tv in some Resident's room. My advise, take the night shift and do it for a few months and then move on to greener pastures. I'm waiting for my acceptance letter for the Nursing Program. Good Luck if you in the field.

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      ReedRobbins 5 years ago

      Thanks for exposing the true realities of being a CNA. Anybody considering this area as a new career should definitely weigh the pros and cons. Good work - I "liked" your lens for you!

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      Thanks for writing this I understand completely where your coming from its exactly like this in my work place and in the back of my mind I think it can't be like this in every nursing home I have the manager constantly putong us down because some little tasks don't manage to get done well in my opinion how do they expect you to when you have 15 residents each end bath them feed them and transfer them when there all hoisted and then they employ 15 year old volunteers so it makes it look like they have plenty of staff on but on the floor there useless, we have also been told to get people ready on the bed on ther own these are people that can't roll over, I know if it were me lying in that bed I wouldn't want to be shoved over and what about if I injured them it wouldn't be on there head it would be on mine, dnt get me wrong i do enjoy my job I like the fact we always have something to do and the day goes dead fast but I feel so guilty because I know tasks aren't getting completed which makes you feel a bad carer, and I don't mean this the wrong way but we hardly get paid any money for it, no know what you mean about nurses some are like do this do that but I have to say we are quite lucky that we have a few that will help us out by transferring and making beds etc, but its like what can you do to make families and your manager aware of where your coming from without sounding like your moaning :(

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      NehveF 5 years ago

      @anonymous: I agree. It's not so much the duties that are so bad---it's how you're treated.

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      Well Said. A little higher pay rate would be nice as well. I always think the difference between the CNA's and RN's is weight gain. CNA's are working the whole shift and are always in better shape. The RN's are always sitting at the nursing station eating. LOL

      There should be more team work involved as a whole. As a guy I can see just how caddy so many of the nurses are. They talk about each other behind their backs, and never really offer help the way they should.

      It would make life easier for everyone including residents. I always say they should have 2 aids that just float and answer calls, and are there to help lift.

      Anyway ....... yawn .......

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      I Totally agree with everything you've just said on all accounts very accurate. A day in the life of bieng a cna...you here the jobs in high demand and that's only because you're bieng brutally abused by staff such as the nurses or administration has a problem with the way you're doing you're job.saying you're not doing enough or giving proper care and safety of the residents the next thing you know you're bieng terminated for that reason.and after taking the training/courses necessary for becoming a cna and successfully obtaining work and working your tale off that's the thanks you get and it dos'nt matter that the people you're caring for just love you to pieces and think you're doing a great job.and that the other cna/coworkers strongly disagree on the reason you're bieng terminated after all the hard work you've put in and not to mention the tlc and becoming attached to some of the residents and how they will miss you once your gone and no longer able to be there for them and care for them and believe me there were many i did really care for and grew to love as my own family..this is very hurtful to me as well as the ones i've cared for and grown close to...such an unfair situation..not to mention how do you move on after bieng terminated so unjustly and unfairly..i mean that really doesn't look to well on you resume or when applying for other jobs as a cna ? anyone out there have any advice about this and how i can continue work as a cna and obtain other jobs after my career and reputation bieng tarnished and may as well say shredded.anyone have any helpful advice as to how i can overcome this sitution and continue working as a cna if so contact me at c.kagey@yahho.com... as i feel this was very unfair to me an my residents since i gave them the proper care and tlc they needed and am sure they missed me as much as i missed most of them...Help if you can!!!! Thanks

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      I agree, but the residents where I work do get very violent. They will grab you or another resident hair and shake your head around, try to get the shower heads from you just to beat you with it, they try to break your fingers, punch you in the face, kick you in the stomach, bite, digg their nails into you, throw nasty brief, spit in your face, etc.... And they look like little innocent old ladies. I've been doing this for only 6 years and I have to find a different job because I can't take them anymore. This job is very depressing I've watched residents come in almost completely there, seen them get worse and have watched them pass away. By the time I get home I'm exhausted I don't have the energy for my family. But don't get me wrong, there are still some super sweet ones always saying they love you, they like to joke, say thank you, some will even apologize for the way the man resident treated you, I've even had them try to defend me.

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      Totally Agree!

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      i really found this article helpful, i'm in my CNA classes right now and i have already heard some of what was said because my aunt that i live with is a LPN at the nursing home ill be working at, but some stuff i have not heard before...tomorrow i will be grilling and questioning her on her perrogatives as a lpn on cna's mwahahaha! lol i can't wait this is going to be good

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      ReedRobbins 5 years ago

      Wow! I've done a lot of research on CNAs and never heard a first hand, honest portrayal like this until reading your fascinating lens. I think you deserve a lot of credit for "telling it like it is," and that anybody thinking about embarking on this career should read your educational words. Great job!

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      So a CNA can go to work for a resident and not be responsible if a person falls what would a person charge

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      Oh my gosh I did my first CNA job over the summer and I thought I wrote this myself..every single thing described my summer and to be honest I am not a cna right now only because I am going to school full time(I probably will do it again next summer). School is stressfull and I would not stay sane if I did both. thank you

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      I agree with pretty much all of this!! I currently work at an assisted living facility. There are 4 apartments each with 5 residents, and each apartment has one RA (residents assistant) I have my CNA but this was the best job I could find (I guess) while having only 5 residents sounds simple, it's really not. On my evening shift (245-1045PM) I am responsible for cooking supper, feeding two residents, doing all the dishes for my apartment, and by 6pm I can finally begin my cares. They used to go pretty fast when we had an EZlift, but they recently changed everyone to hoyer and so me and whoever is in the apartment next to me have to do all cares together - so that's now 10 people. There are several residents that DEMAND to have their cares done at a certain time, in a certain AMOUNT of time, or they will become violent or just won't stop loudly complaining until they get their way - which is fine at first until it won't stop and your head is already pounding from attempting to meet everyones needs. And not only do I do all the cooking and cleaning and cares, I also have to pass medications! I still haven't understood how this is legal, since an RA has no certification or training for that (CNA classes taught us that was illegal - and CNAs actually go to school!!)

      I do love my job - I've had some heart-melting moments with my residents and I DO feel good to have this experience and know that I'm helping. but it has certainly been taking its toll on me! the beds are all broken at this place and so I am constantly leaning down much too far to roll very heavy people....I've began to have unending migrines and back and neck and knee aches from this job. I am currently in school to be a nurse practitioner in oncology pediatrics and I cannot wait to get out of this field!!!!!! It may be right for some people, but the geriatric age group and work is not meant for me. kudos to those of you that have been doing this for so long! As soon as my RN is complete I'm OUT!

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      i read this due to the fact i am looking into becoming a CNA but wanted to know the truth about it, thank you for posting this it is very helpful.:)

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      Happy to hear you are not a cna anymore. The last thing these places need are incompetent. Not washing residents just because they have no visits or they stay in bed all day? Disgusting.

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      I agree completely! I just started working as a CNA (almost at it 2 weeks now) and it has been miserable. I haven't worked on my feet for an 8 hour shift if years. I needed the CNA certification and 1000 hours of work and I assumed that this would be a piece of cake. Boy was I wrong. But, knowing that I couldn't quit because I needed the hours as a prerequisite for PA school, helped me to stay on the job. By day 3, I was ready to quit- not because of having to clean up and care for the residents- but because of the demanding/stressful environment. I am slowly getting used to the residents and learning the individual needs for everyone and "shorts cuts" (those which don't comprimise the safety for respect of the patient, but which save time). Although it is getting better, if I did not have to work as a CNA, I probably wouldn't. I know this sounds bad, but it is a very demanding job and it is very hard to adjust to. This article helped me to understand that I am not alone in what is expected of me!

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      I deinitely agree with what was written here. I've been a CNA for 4 mths now and I'm really starting to hate it, but I think it's more to do with the actual facility than my duties as a CNA. I dred going to work in fear of having more than my share of residents or no lights (we actually had to use flashlights) or lack of materials or the attitudes of the other CNA's & Nurses. I thought about giving up and quitting althogether, but I think I'll just change facilities even though where I live there are no jobs and you're stuck going through an agency where you're getting the crappiest pay ever and stuck working per diem. That's what I'm doing now. Anyway...I wish us all the best of luck and hopefully I get accepted to this university b/c I certainly couldn't do this type of work for the rest of my life.

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      Having been a CNA for over 11 years I have to agree with just about everything written here. I've worked in nursing homes, assisted living facilities and for private clients. CNA work can be difficult. It is stressful, frustrating but on occasion it can be rewarding. Most of the time the issues isn't the duties required of CNAs but the way they are treated by other employees and how the role of CNA is not properly utilized within a facility. Thanks for being so honest.

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      AGREE. I agree entirely and completely with this article. This explains everything on my mind completely. I am about to apply for nursing schools next semester :). Which I am overly excited about. Ive always wanted to do nursing I love the aspect of passing medications being able to help out people. But it is true. I took a CNA course my friend told me it was a good way to step in the medical field to get experience. But everywhere i go they turn me down Saying they would have preferred a EMT license(whereas you learn more medically ). CNA's endure the most horrible things. Ive worked with a Registry that sends out to different nursing homes. I had to drive miles to get my experience. and patients would hit me , i got kicked in the stomach, my hair was pulled, people have spit on me. I am only 21 years old. And the nurses would always say how I look so young and what I am studying to become. I say nursing and right away they say why i work in nursing homes? The majority of LVN's you meet are one's who tried to become an RN but failed or wasn't able to enter the program do to low grades, GPA and such. I was the youngest worker in my registry in general out of all the CNA's and LVN's, RN's. I have seen everything. In class they do sugar coat everything. They do not tell you you will endure mental abuse from this job. People putting you done and physical pain. I have been applying constantly and volunteering to hospitals but they can care less of my experience and all of what i had to go through. It'd about people you know to get you into the hospital not how hard you work. And to top it off i worked from 11- 7 AM in this high class nursing home and the place refused to pay me for 3 days of work! 24 hours of work they refused to pay my registry to pay me. That is AGAINST THE LAW. And this place is so cheap they taught CNAs to make and pass meds. And the CNAs are not trained to know what to do with meds and their side effects, this place was so cheap they made their cnas do a nurses job so they would have to pay a nurse that money and can pay their cnas 9$ an hour. I am completely disgusted and feel a little low of myself because i am so young and what i have gone through. No one would help me transfer and if i have asked id wait an hour or so until finally someone would help but i'd always be talked down to by nurses. And in many several of the homes i was sent to, they used towels as diapers and everything was not properly sanitized. Residents kept catching viruses and were left plaint filthy and dirty. While the owner of the nursing home was dressed so nice in a suit and drove an expensive car he could care less of the welfare of his residents and workers. The state needs to investigate more into nursing homes and on top of it it was only when residents family members were visiting would the "clean towels, good soap, bed sheets" would be used and you'd have to be extra nice. For those who are considering CNA course and who want a little step into the nursing field i hope and wish you the best. Study study study hard because you will become something one day and you need to be able to understand this field that everyone is out for themselves you can not trust anyone expect those who have been in your shoes.

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      I work every other weekend as a cna now. I am in the process of a much needed career change. i loved your article, I wish I could of read this before I went to school and took up this line of work. i really do hate this line of work, but having two kids, i have to work, if i don't line up a new job soon, I;m back to picking up my regular hours at the nursing home :(

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      Thank you so much for this lens! ihave just started working night shift as a new CNA (experience wise. I have had my certificate for two years but with school for becoming an RN it has been hard to find before now to get a job where they didn't already want experience. My first day I was really nervous I wouldn't remember anything, but I was in an easy section. After that, I got put on a very busy hall and this past weekend there was a virus among the residents so even though it was nighttime, it might as well have been morning shift. One day I left an hour later than I was scheduled because it was so much work. I had between 20 and 30 residents to take care of that night, most with diarrhea and vomiting (sOme Of it projectile, all of it copious), and many were mostly total care and very large. I was so discouraged and ended up getting the bug myself. I tried to call out early and received only impatience and refusals unless I called closer to shift (which is so backwards in logic). Well see if I will even have a job tomorrow! Even though I found this lens under "I hate being a CNA", this was really encouraging to try to stick with it at least till school starts back up. Even though it's hard, it's nice to know that I am having a typical experience so I can figure out ways to do my job well and not lose my sanity, enthusiasm, or health. Thanks again!

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      @anonymous: I have been a CNA for about 8 mo. now & I have worked in longterm care. my first nursing home was terrible i was overworked like crazy the only thing that made me stay was the money. in the long run I felt that working in such a hostile & demanding inviorment helped me develop a backbone, but now I work in a different nursing home it's not near as bad just deppressing that all. Verry helpful read.

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      If you "don't have the personality" to get a job at Walmart, then you certainly don't have the personality to take care of people. How can you tell the "truth" about a job if you didn't even want it in the first place?

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      Wow you hit everything on the head exactly! I have both worked in a hospital and now working in a nursing home. I enjoyed the hospital setting, but there too CNA's are worked to "death". When I first oriented it was great. It was an 18 bed unit and I was told there would always be two CNA's working a shift...nine patients, not bad...but then new nursing managers came in and it went downhill from there. We were told that changes were being made, but they would be affecting the nurses, not the CNA's...which was a lie, it ONLY affected us. We had our schedule, but if they didn't need us they would "call" us off, which meant we didn't get our full time pay, but 2.00/hour for that day, but if they decided they needed us at 11:00 we had to come in. For one pay period I lost 30 hours of full time pay. Or if we did come in they would just stick us anywhere where they wanted, even though we were hired for a specific floor or make us sit with someone for 12 hours....I was fortunate to work with about 3 excellent nurses who knew the meaning of "team work" and would bath, change briefs, help me out in anyway. So needless to say I left there...I was traveling an hour each way for this?...so I stayed with the same company but came closer to home (7 mins away) to a nursing home. Of course orientation went well, but when I was released on my own...OH MY GOODNESS! It is like you say, the most frustrating thing is the the nurses (most LPN's) will not help do anything...will not answer call bells, feed, change, but will hunt us down in another room to do something they could do. I had one who spent 15 mins trying to figure out who was assigned to a certain room because she needed vitals. In that 15 mins she could have gone a taken them. We are supposed to get a 15 min break and then 30 mins for lunch. I have NEVER had my 15 min break and there are many days I do not get a lunch. I can go the whole 8 hours with out eating, drinking or peeing! I can tell it is starting to affect my own health, and it is nust not worth it. I am thinking about giving up CNA work altogether....maybe go flip some burgers or something..lol...

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      I so agree with you! I have been a CNA for 7 years doing in home care but the economy forced me into the nursing home. I can honestly say that I hate it with a passion, but I love my kids more and right now its the only thing going in NC/SC. The patients will never get the care they need and I am beginning to see it as more of a psyc ward and safety for the cna is no part of the training process. Its sad and I am burned out and will not be returning to it if I ever get an out. For the new CNA think once, twice and then think again, there is no glory in in CNA work but there are plenty of guts to it. The sad part is the residents have no choice and you are there only hope for anything. Even prisoners on death row get more care than your residents ever will and more rights. All the best to you. The article was perfect!

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      anonymous 6 years ago

      i agree with everything u said i been a cna for ten years i love the residents but it is mentally and physically challeging i am tired burned out now i can barely make it through one day

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      anonymous 6 years ago

      I have been a CNA for 12 years and it's a job I take pride in. I agree with everything u have said. I have worked in nursing homes, adult family homes and hospitals. They all have their pros and cons. Thanks for telling other people some of the things we go thru. We r never "JUST" cnas. We r the backbone in these facilites.