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What is Fear of birds?

Updated on June 13, 2015

Read first:

For the meanings of bird parts, or words, which you do not understand in this Hub, see my bird glossary.

If what you want is not in there, please let me know so that I can add into in the glossary.

What it means:

Ornithology – watching and learning what you want about birds by using books, binoculars and may other sources.




Bird feeders

Click thumbnail to view full-size
Composite image of various defensive and evasive moves by a female ruby-throated hummingbird (Archilochus colubris) at a man-made feeder near Rossville, Tennessee. Birds around a bird feeder made from a Coke bottle in Johannesburg, South Africa.
Composite image of various defensive and evasive moves by a female ruby-throated hummingbird (Archilochus colubris) at a man-made feeder near Rossville, Tennessee.
Composite image of various defensive and evasive moves by a female ruby-throated hummingbird (Archilochus colubris) at a man-made feeder near Rossville, Tennessee. | Source
 Birds around a bird feeder made from a Coke bottle in Johannesburg, South Africa.
Birds around a bird feeder made from a Coke bottle in Johannesburg, South Africa. | Source

Binoculars

A view of binoculars with a leather neck strap.
A view of binoculars with a leather neck strap. | Source

Are you one of them?

Are you, or is someone that you know, a birdwatcher?

See results

Ornithology:

There are many avid birdwatchers around the world. They enjoy checking out the birds – in their backyard and many other places – there are even scientists and historians who research birds. Birdwatchers also enjoy feeding birds and do so in many ways. There are feeders with various types of seeds and other food for the birds. Some birdwatchers just plant gardens and attract birds, butterflies and other insects and animals. Others use both feeders and gardens.

Some birders are so attracted to birds that they almost always have their heads in the clouds. When birds come to feeders the birders have their eyes on them almost until the birds leave unless those people have more important affairs. It is the same if the birds come to the bird baths, gardens, etc. If there is a bird singing, or calling, the birdwatcher is immediately looking in his/her book(s) or naming the bird – depending on the experience of the birder.

There are also people who have birds for pets. They feed them, play with them, and touch them lovingly. These birds are cared for as one of the family just like people who have pet dogs, cats, fish and so on.



















What it means:

Ornithophobia – The fear and worry that you are going to be attacked, or perhaps even killed, by birds or simply by catching their diseases.

Click thumbnail to view full-size
 Mute swans one of the many ponds just in front of the central buildings. Good fun feeding them if you don't mind the odd over-enthusiastic snap of a beak. Female hummingbird (on feeder) has no color while male has color on throat.
 Mute swans one of the many ponds just in front of the central buildings. Good fun feeding them if you don't mind the odd over-enthusiastic snap of a beak.
Mute swans one of the many ponds just in front of the central buildings. Good fun feeding them if you don't mind the odd over-enthusiastic snap of a beak. | Source
Female hummingbird (on feeder) has no color while male has color on throat.
Female hummingbird (on feeder) has no color while male has color on throat. | Source

Do you have it?

Are you, or is someone that you know, afraid of birds?

See results

Ornithophobia:

Most of us are not aware of the fact that there are people who have a fear of birds. Sure, it is simple to notice the general fear of large birds (such as hawks, vultures and even geese). There are more of us who are alert of an everyday occurrence such as the fear of dogs. Since most have loud barks plus when they growl their teeth show. Yet there are simple humans in the public the same as us who are afraid of birds. We may not notice some of them because they stay in their houses-apartments due to their fear being very extreme.

While some people may only fear predatory birds, others may fear simple caged pets. Maybe they are alarmed at being attacked or they may only be afraid of the moving wings, or Pteronophobia (fear of feathers) they are not really afraid of the birds. The bird’s movements or coming towards people looking forward to food can also cause the problems. It may be from a funeral in the past or from a nightmare.

Some people might be afraid of certain hummingbirds, going crazy when they see them, and have no idea why. It could be because they have Chromatopobia (fear of colors). Different birds have different colors.


The fear of catching something from the bird may be one reason, or it may be any combination of what I have mentioned. It can also be caused by the loudness of the sounds - or the sound of the sounds - that the birds make. It may even be caused entirely by another phobia. Maybe when they were on a plane trip the pilot announced about problems because a flock of birds flew into the engines (poor birds). Now besides fear of birds they might also have Aviophobia (fear of flying) too.

When people who are afraid of birds see one (or more) bird the person turns and walks the other way. They may only hear a bird singing and start to have reactions to the sound. If birds may even come up as a subject in a conversation the people may try to change the subject or walk out of the room if they cannot change it.

Source

Possible reasons:

You are now a grownup and do not know why you are afraid of birds. Say when you were a child you were walking along a boardwalk, minding your own business and a seagull took a piece or two of your popcorn. It is because of a phobia caused by suppressed memory from your childhood that you have forgotten about. Another example is if there was a bird caught in your chimney and the only route of escape which the bird found was down into the house, perhaps you had a childhood experience with this event which you do not remember.

Symptoms:

Then there are also the symptoms which are so much like so many other illnesses that it would be easy to confuse them. Some people run out of breath, without moving, while others get dizzy and there is also excessive sweating and some may feel sick. There are people who get dry in their mouth, others get shaky and some have palpitations in their heart and then there are those that find themselves unable to speak or think clearly. There are quite a few more symptoms and it is possible to get two or more of these. Even simply hearing the sounds of the birds can set the phobia and these symptoms into motion.

A possible way to release:

If you are able to remember or to have someone else remember for you, the occurrence from childhood which caused the problem, then perhaps you can relive the basic experience.

Take the example of the child on the boardwalk. If that was you, go back to the boardwalk and take with you a bag of bread crumbs. When you see the seagulls toss the crumbs as far as you want in order to feed the birds and see that they are not after you - just the food.

Sheldon makes friends w/bird he was afraid of

Releasing fear with laughter:

Take “The Big Bang Theory”, in episode 9 of season 5 Sheldon is trying to chase away a bird on the outside windowsill because he is afraid of it. He tries everything to get rid of it but has no success. Even when someone gets him to pet it he is still afraid of it because after he pets it he still wants them to get rid of it. Eventually, when the window is opened the bird flies back out. At the end of the episode he uncovers the nest to reveal one egg and tells Leonard that he (Sheldon) is going to be a mother. Throughout the episode he calls it a Blue Jay but that is not what it actually is.

There is another episode where the bird gets inside and at the beginning all that Sheldon is repeating is, "Get it out of here." Eventually the bird lands on Sheldons arm and he befriends it. It is shown in the video.

When he was about 7 years old he was chased up a tree by a chicken. I believe that he also had problems with a parrot. These are examples of childhood traumas but Sheldon remembers them. Probably because he has an eidetic (photographic) memory. His memory did not fade it stayed with him as he grew up.

This is possibly one way to release your fear. It has to be deep laughter from your abdomen because that is where your fear is.

Click thumbnail to view full-size
American Robin Northern Cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis) or Redbird
American Robin
American Robin | Source
Northern Cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis) or Redbird
Northern Cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis) or Redbird | Source
Source

Those who are in between:

Then there are those that do not become mesmerized or go crazy when they see or hear birds. They might feed them but just go about their everyday business and do not keep a watchful eye on the time when the feeders run out. They do not know one bird from another except for perhaps certain ones like robins, cardinals and Blue Jays.

They are not intimidated by birds - except maybe large ones like hawks and vultures - nor do they even twitch when they hear a bird make a sound, unless they really like the music. Then they might say to someone, "Listen to that music. Is it not beautiful?"


Author: Kevin - ©2013

© 2013 The Examiner-1

Comments

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    • The Examiner-1 profile imageAUTHOR

      The Examiner-1 

      4 years ago

      Hello Eiddwen, I am glad that you enjoyed it. I found out many things myself when I wrote this and they surprised me. I thank you for your voting and sharing and I am working on a Hub which I believe will make you feel at home.

      Happy birding and here is some of that love back from the U.S.

      Kevin

    • Eiddwen profile image

      Eiddwen 

      4 years ago from Wales

      A brilliant read once again Kevin and so interesting. I know many who don't like their budgies, parrots etc. flying around the house or simply fluttering over their heads.

      Voting up and sharing as always. Here's to so many more hubs for us both to share on here and lots of love from Wales.

      Eddy.

    • The Examiner-1 profile imageAUTHOR

      The Examiner-1 

      4 years ago

      I thought that it was something which was not mentioned that often, at least I did not hear it mentioned. I do not know of anyone and what brought it to my attention was because I am a birdwatcher I became more aware of it. Thank you very much on complimenting my piece.

    • aviannovice profile image

      Deb Hirt 

      4 years ago from Stillwater, OK

      I have a couple of friends that are very fearful of birds, but they don't remember why. This was a good piece on one of many fears that people can have.

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