ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel

List of German Text Books for Beginners (A1)

Updated on November 22, 2011
Passwort Deutsch 1
Passwort Deutsch 1

German as a Foreign Language: A1, ACTFL Novice, ILR 0/0+


Wondering about the best course book for teaching German to beginners? In the following list, you’ll find German A1 (ACTFL Novice & ILR 0/0+) course books based on The Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR) for Languages. These course books are used in European foreign language schools and they are acknowledged by the Goethe-Institut (GI), a German cultural institution operating worldwide and promoting the study of the German language abroad.


Goethe-Institut examinations and certificates are accepted as a language qualification by employers and various education institutions in Europe and many other countries. Courses, common reference levels, exams, and certificates range from A1 (the beginner’s level) to C2 (proficient speaker).


German A1 common reference level is usually divided into two courses: A1.1 and A1.2. According to Germany’s international broadcaster aimed at the overseas market - Deutsche Welle (DW), sponsored by the German government - A1 is reached with cca. 75 hours of German study.

European Framework of Reference A1: the beginner's level

In the U.S., the European Framework of Reference A1 is equivalent with:

  • The Interagency Language Roundtable (ILR) scale: ILR Level 1 – Elementary Proficiency (0/0+)
  • The ACTFL Proficiency Guidelines: Novice – Low (0), Novice – Mid (0/0+), Novice – High (0+)


CEFR language level equivalents

CEFR
ILR
ACTFL
A1 – Breakthrough or beginner's level
Elementary Proficiency: 0/0+
Novice:
 
 
Novice-Low: NL (0)
 
 
Novice-Mid: NM (0/0+)
 
 
Novice-High: NH (0+)
Table 1. Correspondences published by the American University Center of Provence

German A1.1 and A1.2: Course Books for Beginners

Looking for the right "German as a Foreign Language" A1 beginner’s textbook/course book? Teacher or learner, you may choose between these editions:

Coursebook Title
Description
Author
eurolingua Deutsch 1: Volume 1
Language: German. A1 level: Unit 1 – 16. Textbook and Workbook. Available online on Amazon.de
Dr. Herman Funk, Michael Koeing et al.
Delfin Level A1 Part 1: A1.1
Language: German. Includes Textbook and Workbook. Audio-CD. Lessons 1-7. Available online on Amazon.de
Hartmut Aufderstraße, Juta Müller and Thomas Storz
Delfin Level A1 Part 1: A1.2
Language: German. Includes Textbook and Workbook. Audio-CD. Lessons 8-14. Available online on Amazon.de
Hartmut Aufderstraße, Juta Müller and Thomas Storz
Passwort Deutsch - Kursbuch 1
Language: German. Textbook and Workbook. Lessons 1-10. Audio CD. Available online on Amazon.com
Ulrike Albrecht, Dorotea Dane et al.
Passwort Deutsch 1 - Lehrerhandbuch
Language: German.Teacher’s Guide. Available online on Amazon.com
Anneliese Ghahraman-Beck

German Coursebook and Teacher's Guide

German Course Books for Beginners: Bilingual Editions

Most popular bilingual German course books for beginners (in English and German):

Bilingual German Coursebooks for Beginners

Coursebook Title
Comment
Author
Publisher
Ultimate German Beginner-Intermediate
Language: English and German. Coursebook. 40 lessons. Available online on Amazon.com
Ingeborg Lasting, Heidi Singer
Living Language; large type edition edition (September 21, 2004)
Willkomen
Language: English and German. Coursebook. Available online on Amazon.com
Paul Coggle, Heiner Schenke
Unkown (2009)
Herr Biedermann und die Brandstifter / Rip van Winkle
Language: Spanish and German. Workbook with grammar explained. Available online on Amazon.com
Roland Schäpers, Renate Luscher and Manfred Glück
Verlag für Deutsch (1998), Max-Hueber
Bilingual Coursebooks: German-English, German-Spanish

Bilingual German Coursebooks

Before you Choose your German Coursebook

If you are a teacher getting ready to teach German abroad, learn all about the beginner’s level in learning and teaching German language as a foreign language:

  • what is A1 level in learning foreign languages
  • what are A1 learners supposed to be able to do in reading, listening, speaking and writing
  • how to use alternative teaching materials for the beginner’s level
  • how to play educational classroom games
  • how is the A1 certificate exam for German language structured
  • pick up some learning and teaching German tips

Comments

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    • profile image

      Karim Bounou 

      4 years ago

      thanks ^^

    • vox vocis profile imageAUTHOR

      Jasmine 

      5 years ago

      I'm happy to learn German (although it's not easy) and I love learning foreign languages in general. Many newcomers don't respect the states where they have started their new lives and they just ask for their rights as if they haven't gotten too much already.

    • Peggy W profile image

      Peggy Woods 

      5 years ago from Houston, Texas

      My grandparents could speak German but did not pass that knowledge on to their kids, except a few words or in a few songs. Back in that era and prior to it, many of the people coming to the U.S. strove to learn English and be assimilated into the culture as quickly as possible. Far different from many who come here today and expect to be taught in their native tongues. Somewhere in those 2 scenarios, there is a happy medium. Voted useful.

    • vox vocis profile imageAUTHOR

      Jasmine 

      6 years ago

      @denkmuskel: I finished B2 in the "volkshochschule" and decided to continue by self-tutoring at home. I should repeat everything and buy the coursebook for C1, and then take the exam. Watching German TV helps a lot: "Deutschland Sucht Den Superstar," for example :) I also like "Wer Wird Millionär" or "Rette die Million." I couldn't read your hub because it's still in the edit mode.

    • denkmuskel profile image

      Michael Schmitz 

      6 years ago from Berlin

      I've made a hub out of it. Better formatting possibilities. So how far has your German come? I will have to take a close look on your profile later. Although I've hear of "Passwort" I've never had to work with it. It's sometimes hard to understand what authors thought when composing these confusing and incomplete textbooks and it is a pain in the neck to work with bad material. You'll find the hub here: https://hubpages.com/hubtool/edit/3011068

    • vox vocis profile imageAUTHOR

      Jasmine 

      6 years ago

      @denkmuskel: You're right on the spot there! I never use student's books as the sole content of the lesson. Instead, I spend some time reading the texts and solving some exercises, but then I leave the rest for people to do at home and ask me questions if something isn't clear to them. Also, I try to go through exercises similar to those in workbooks so that students can exercise some more at home.

      Hueber publications are professional and useful(I use their grammar books and workbooks, too - as a student).

      I can't really tell which of the German coursebooks is the best, but as a learner, I must say that Passwort Deutsch isn't that interesting or well-organized (and I've heard this from my friends who are teaching German). Yet, the book is the most widely used German coursebook in Europe, and based on this book learners have their exams, so it might be the best choice. Those German learners (in America or elsewhere) who want to take their exams at the Göethe Institute should also use this book, but they won't find a bilingual glossary at the end, and will have to use a dictionary on the side.

      I'd be very glad if you'd list those B2 books meeting the criteria here unless you wrote a hub on the topic I could link to. On my way now to see your articles :)

      P.S. I teach English and Italian as a second language.

    • denkmuskel profile image

      Michael Schmitz 

      6 years ago from Berlin

      So Vox, what is the best course book for teaching German to beginners in your opinion. Couldn't figure that out in this hub. And I would add that a good coursebook should not only have a teacher's guide that usually contains not only instructions and grammatical background information as well as templates for bonus exercises. There should also be bilingual glossarys (word-lists) available. The answer key for the students (if they are old or disciplined enough) is a must and CDs with transcriptions of the audio material should be mandatory. The higher level books are usually more equipped. Maybe the publishing houses think that beginners cannot work autonomously. A workbook is a must, integrated or extra. There is only few books that fulfill these criteria for intermediate students (B2). For beginners I haven't done my research yet. We work with Lagune [Hueber] that offers lots of exercises. But in the end it all depends on the teacher and his additional material. A book should deliver or support the teacher's guideline but never be the sole content of the lesson.

    • vox vocis profile imageAUTHOR

      Jasmine 

      6 years ago

      @careercounselor: I don't speak French, but plan to learn it some day, too :)

    • careercounselor profile image

      careercounselor 

      6 years ago

      That's okay, I like French it is such a beautiful language, I don't think I have tried German yet.

    • vox vocis profile imageAUTHOR

      Jasmine 

      6 years ago

      @careercounselor: Interesting idea, but I don't know much about non-European languages :(

    • careercounselor profile image

      careercounselor 

      6 years ago

      How about Korean? I here it is a good one for those in business careers.

    • vox vocis profile imageAUTHOR

      Jasmine 

      6 years ago

      Actually, I could do the same hub for beginners in French:) I've got the material (a brochure of an adult learning center where they teach foreign languages and the internet, of course).

      I wrote this hub because a German person currently living in Mexico ended up on my other "German hub" and asked if I could help him to find a coursebook for beginners (he wants to teach the language there). So, instead of listing them in the comments, I wrote a hub :)

      Interesting that you know about Deutsche Welle. See, it is a small world after all :)

    • profile image

      PWalker281 

      6 years ago

      If I ever wanted to learn German, I'd use your hub as a reference, vox vocis. Excellent overview of what's available for those wanting to learn and teach German. Maybe you could do one for French ;-). Rated up and useful.

      P.S. We used to get Deutsche Welle programming here in Hawaii on one of the public access cable channels, but I haven't seen it in awhile. I think the community wanted to see more Hawaiian language programming.

    working

    This website uses cookies

    As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, hubpages.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

    For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: https://hubpages.com/privacy-policy#gdpr

    Show Details
    Necessary
    HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
    LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
    Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
    AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
    Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
    CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
    Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
    Features
    Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
    Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
    Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
    Marketing
    Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
    Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
    Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
    Statistics
    Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
    ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)