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State of Arkansas - Pottery and History Curriculum Lesson for Homeschooling or Summer Enrichment

Updated on July 12, 2013
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Arkansas

Arkansas is rich in history and facts. One of our presidents was born and raised there. Use this lesson to teach your child a little more about Arkansas and all it has to offer. This pottery lesson can be as complex or as simple as you want. You can just read the facts to your kids, or you can delve in deeper. Check out library books. Make a recipe related to the state. Write a report or make a lapbook. There are all kinds of ways you can use this lesson. Above all, have fun learning together with your kids.

State Abbreviation: AR

Capital: Little Rock

State Nickname: The Natural State

State Motto: “Regnat populus” – The people rule.

State Song: “Arkansas”

State Bird: Mockingbird

State Insect: Honeybee

State Flower: Apple Blossom

State Fruit: South Arkansas Vine Ripe Pink Tomato

State Gem: Diamond


Some Famous People from Alabama:

Bill Clinton, 42nd US President

Lou Brock, famous baseball player

Jerry Jones, owner of the Dallas Cowboys

Joe Perry, famous football player

John Grisham, author

Sam Walton, founder of Wal-Mart

Alexander Hawthorne, Confederate Brigadier General

Douglas MacArthur, general of the US Army


Fun Facts:

Wal-Mart was founded by Sam Walton in Bentonville, AR. (Field trip to Wal-Mart, kids!)

The toothbrush was invented in Arkansas.

Arkansas has the only active diamond mine in America.

Hope, AR is the town where Bill Clinton was born. Each year, it hosts a watermelon festival.


For Arkansas, we are going to make a slice of watermelon in honor of Hope, AR, the birthplace of President Bill Clinton.

First, you make a ball.

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Next, you squish it.

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Then, shape it into a triangle.

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This is the basic shape you should have.

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Make a worm shape to be the rind.

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Attach the rind to the watermelon.

If you aren't sure how to properly attach pieces of clay, visit my hub on how to work with "real" clay.
If you aren't sure how to properly attach pieces of clay, visit my hub on how to work with "real" clay. | Source

Make small balls to be the seeds.

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Attach as many seeds as you want.

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Draw a line to make it look more like a rind and less like a pizza crust.

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Voila! It's a watermelon!

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