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Background Information about my great grandfather - Reginald Trevor - a soldier in World War 1

Updated on October 23, 2012
Reginald Trevor
Reginald Trevor
The HMAT Clan MacGillivray (A46) departing and being assisted by a tug. This was the ship that took my great grandfather to war.
The HMAT Clan MacGillivray (A46) departing and being assisted by a tug. This was the ship that took my great grandfather to war. | Source
My great grandmother - Beatrice Mabel Hodgson - wife of Reginald Trevor.
My great grandmother - Beatrice Mabel Hodgson - wife of Reginald Trevor.
William Edward Trevor, Reginald Trevor's son. William joined the Navy and sailed on HMAS Rushcutter in World War Two. He fought in the Battle of the Coral Sea.
William Edward Trevor, Reginald Trevor's son. William joined the Navy and sailed on HMAS Rushcutter in World War Two. He fought in the Battle of the Coral Sea.
Colour patch of the 5th Battalion
Colour patch of the 5th Battalion | Source

Born: 1891

Reginald Trevor, my great grandfather, was born in Prahran, Victoria, Australia, in 1891 to mother Lucella Brissenden. When he was 24 years old, he volunteered to join up to fight in the infantry in World War One and was assigned to the 5th Battalion, 2nd Reinforcements. This Battalion was sourced from Victoria and was one of the first Battalions to be formed. The enthusiasm of young men all over Australia to join up meant that this Battalion was raised within 2 weeks of the declaration of World War One in August 1914.

Reginald was working in country Victoria as a labourer when the war was declared. He sold his horse and enlisted in Trafalgar, Victoria on the 17th October, 1914. Along with his fellow soldiers, he embarked from Melbourne, Victoria, on board HMAT A46 Clan Macgillivray (pictured) on 2 February 1915. He fought in the battles of Gallipoli and Pozieres in the Somme Valley amongst others and was wounded in France by a shell and exposed to gas which resulted in shell shock on 25th July 1916.

Due to the effects on his heath from the gas and shell shock, he was assessed by the Medical Board as being unfit to return to the front. He was assigned to 'Home Service' in England, and he was based at Tidworth in England doing administrative work for the army. He found this tedious and felt he was no longer contributing as much to the war, however it gave him the opportunity to meet his future wife, English woman Beatrice Mabel Hodgson (pictured). He continued to serve in England until the end of the war and returned to Australia with his wife and their first child in 1920. While on the boat to Australia, their second child was born. My grandfather William Edward Trevor (pictured) was born in Yenda, a small town on the Murrumbidgee River on the border of New South Wales and Victoria.

The Australian government allocated my great grandfather a plot of farmland on which he grew an orchid of stone fruit and citrus. Life was hard on the farm and it was a struggle to make ends meet. All together, they had 7 children.

My grandfather William Edward Trevor fought in World War 2 in the Australian Navy and was involved in the Battle of the Coral Sea.

Further information:

The 5th Battalion moved around to a number of locations including Albany, Western Australia, Egypt and later participated in the ANZAC landing on 25 April 1915 in the "second wave". This Battalion was led by Lieutenant Colonel D.S. Wanliss. After Gallipoli, my great grandfather returned with his Battalion to Egypt and in March 1916 was sent to France and the Western Front. From that time until 1918, the 5th Battalion fought the German Army in a number of fierce battles including at Pozieres in the Somme Valley in July 1916. My great grandfather writes in his letters of his experiences at Pozieres and attributes his shell shock and wounding to this battle. Once I have transcribed these letters I will link to them from this hub.

For a good source of information about this Battalion and World War One from the Australian perspective, visit the Australian War Memorial website: http://www.awm.gov.au/

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    • Rufus rambles profile image
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      Rufus rambles 5 years ago from Australia

      @CASE1WORKER:

      Yes he made it through and went on to marry and have many children! As he says in his letters on more than one occasion - 'Don't worry mother I am too lucky to be killed'. On one occasion after a surge from the trenches, he was one of only 3 men left standing.

    • CASE1WORKER profile image

      CASE1WORKER 5 years ago from UNITED KINGDOM

      Thankyou- just read the letter hub from Gallipoli an just had to come over to find out more about him and if he did indeed make it through.

    • Rufus rambles profile image
      Author

      Rufus rambles 5 years ago from Australia

      @Sophie's soap box:

      Yes we are very lucky to have found the letters and I hope that by posting them online all our family and other people who are interested can learn from these remarkable windows into history.

    • Sophie's soap box profile image

      Sophie's soap box 5 years ago from Australia

      Thank you for providing these details online so that others can ponder and appreciate the legacy he left for all of us. Congratulations on being diligent enough to find out more about this remarkable man.

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