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Bilingual All-Level Academic Vocabulary: A Focus on Cognates

Updated on November 1, 2015


Introduction: Academic vocabulary is more difficult to learn than conversational language. In fact, low intermediate English speakers with some conversational English ability are assumed by the general public to know far more English than they really do. My folksy way of summarizing my thesis for Bilingual All-Level Academic Vocabulary (BALAV) is the following, “If the newcomer just learned how to say, ‘Mr. Meyer is complaining again.’ then the newcomer better have the chance to read about the recession, tectonics, hyperbole and the quadratic formula in Spanish.” To quote Jane Spalding--a French/German professor: "To understand the culture, you need to understand the language." This applies to content language too. Dr. Spalding made this remark during her address at the kickoff event for the University of Texas at Tyler's Global Awareness through Education (GATE) program on September 25, 2011.

One particular situation really bothers me in secondary education for Limited English Proficiency (LEP) students. Beginners often copy material from the textbook, and they have no idea what the book or the teacher is talking about when they are not in English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL).The study guide for ESOL certification declares that the “linguistic challenge of content should determine the method of instruction; it’s the first consideration of planning.” Fortunately, most secondary Texas textbooks have Spanish glossaries; strangely, English is the major exception. I like the glossaries that do not separate the English Glossary from the Spanish Glossary but instead repeat the same term in English then in Spanish. That way, it’s easier for the student to notice the cognates between the two languages.

I. The National Council for the Teachers of English (NCTE) calls for Limited English Proficient (LEP) students the chance to use their first language to achieve competence in English and develop an understanding of content in curriculum. http://www.readwritethink.org/standards/index.html “IRA/NCTE 12 Standards for the Teaching of the English Language.” Standard #10 pertains to allowing English language learners to make use of their first language. Cognates study forms a bridge from Spanish to English, and cognates can be grouped by prefixes and suffixes. According to Dr. Jill Mora of San Diego State University, "Of the twenty thousand most commonly used words in English, four thousand--or 20 percent--have prefixes. Fifteen prefixes make up 82 percent of the total usage of all prefixes." Here's a chart with 2000 roots, prefixes, and suffixes. http://www.prefixsuffix.com/rootchart.php

II. Technical and formal English have roots in Latin and French—the main ancestor and a relative of Spanish—a Romance language. Thus, cognate study is more important for technical and formal English than informal English, which is German in origin. Furthermore, cognates seem to be far more common in essential vocabulary for English and Social Studies than in overall English a difference of roughly 85% to 62%. So this program is a type of transitional bilingual education that is never all Spanish. It’s not a dual immersion program.

III Bilingual education is not confined to the U.S. Edmonton, Canada is the leader in bilingual education in North America with several bilingual programs, not just French. . http://languages.epsb.ca/ India is another country with extensive bilingual education programs. Some feel that bilingual education is a case of Americans being too nice and not a legitimate program. Becoming fully bilingual improves mental flexibility.

IV. Bilingual assistance for secondary age children could lower the dropout rate. Concern for the dropout rate is a component of national urban planning together with education. Lessening gaps in achievement between the various ethnic groups and socioeconomic levels seems to be a universal goal for all school districts.

V. Immersion (English only) does not provide comprehendible language. Comprehendible input lowers the affective filter. Success in one’s first language is the best predictor of success in the second language. Once you can read, you can read, according to Dr. Stephen Krashen. This is transfer of literacy.

VII. The Tennessee Academic Vocabulary Project contains essential language for all grades and core subjects, roughly thirty terms for each level or course. They have a site with vocabulary games too. http://jc-schools.net/tutorials/vocab/TN.html It’s based on the research of Robert Marzano and Debra Pickering, the recognized leaders in vocabulary instruction. Marzano and Pickering wrote a book with even more vocabulary terms that has over 7900 words.

VII. Let’s group vocabulary according to essential as well as unit, chapter, and section. Testing students over essential vocabulary in their native language in past grades would be an important way of assessing their education in their homeland. The LUCHA program at the University of Texas at Austin examines the transcripts of Mexican students, and it offers Spanish courses on-line to help with the transition from Spanish-only to fully bilingual. http://www.utexas.edu/ce/k16/lucha/overview/?page=overview Furthermore, if a student arrived in this country after the start of the school year, missed essential vocabulary for this year’s subjects could be given to the student.

VIII. Vocabulary instruction compensates for socioeconomic gaps in vocabulary knowledge, according to Marzano and Pickering. http://www.marzanoresearch.com/products/catalog.aspx?group=6 Children from poorer socioeconomic levels don’t hear as many as words as those from wealthier backgrounds.

IX. A school-wide vocabulary program could include Bilingual All-Level Academic Vocabulary as a component. Native English speakers would participate in an all-English program. Check out "Using English for Academic Purposes." http://www.uefap.com/vocab/vocfram.htm

X. At times, we should use the phonetic alphabet since there are more sounds than letters in English. For example, there is a voiced and unvoiced version of the “th” sound. “This” and “that” are voiced while “thick” and “thin” are unvoiced. Also, the “oo” sound when it’s long sounds like the Spanish “u,” such as the “u” in “impromptu” while the “oo” sound when it’s short is like the “u” in “put.”

Summary

Suggesting a cognates-oriented bilingual approach for academic vocabulary after fifth grade doesn’t have to be viewed as heresy. Standard #10 of the National Council for Teachers of English (NCTE) proclaims, “Allow English language learners to make use of their first language.” Finding ways to reduce achievement gaps between English learners and native speakers should be a priority—not to mention reducing dropout rates.

Most importantly for the administrator who wants to lessen the ensuing attacks, one could bury the cognates instruction for ESOL students within an overall Direct Vocabulary Instruction program (Marzano and Pickering) for the entire school or even school district. Vocabulary instruction reduces achievement gaps between socioeconomic groups and was a key component of the state of Tennessee winning the first round of Race to the Top—a National Department of Education contest.

The formal and technical roots of English are in French and Latin while informal English is descended from German. Spanish is a Romance language like French, and both are descended from Latin. Thus, academic language naturally lends itself to cognates study.

Make tables of essential vocabulary available for all core courses. I use four columns, starting with English word and Spanish translation. Then I give a check as to whether the words are cognates or not, something that isn’t an all-or-nothing proposition, especially when two-word terms are present. The last column is for comments, usually left blank, but can mention fine points of difference in grammar between the two languages. Essential vocabulary lists can really help when a student enters the school at a time other than the start of the school year or semester—a bigger possibility for ESOL students. Furthermore, you could quiz the newcomer on the previous year’s vocabulary for your state’s school. I noticed quite a bit of difference in essential vocabulary between Texas and Tennessee.

Refer to the phonetic alphabet. Spanish and English don’t share all the same sounds; some sounds in English don’t even have letters of their own, such as strong and soft “th”, as shown in “Like this and like that, we go through thick and thin.” Many sounds in English can be spelled a variety of ways, such as short “e.”

In short, if the newcomer has just learned to say "Mr. Meyer is writing again," don't expect them to understand academic terms, such as stimulus plan, photosynthesis, analogies, and y-intercept without some English-Spanish cognates and direct vocabulary instruction. For more information, go to this link http://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Bilingual-All-Level-Vocabulary-Unit4-5-English-Social-Studies


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    • bohemiotx profile imageAUTHOR

      Joffre Meyer 

      7 years ago from Tyler, TX

      Finally I added a link to a larger BALAV article at this article's end. The article at T-p-T includes tables of essential vocabulary for 4th and 5th grade English and Social Studies.

    • bohemiotx profile imageAUTHOR

      Joffre Meyer 

      7 years ago from Tyler, TX

      I just built a tag cloud for this article with wordle! Copy/paste the article for best results.

    • bohemiotx profile imageAUTHOR

      Joffre Meyer 

      8 years ago from Tyler, TX

      I just sent the link for this article to 10,000 Solutions at Arizona State, together with a brief summary. Wish me luck and check out the Sun Devils' site!!!

    • bohemiotx profile imageAUTHOR

      Joffre Meyer 

      8 years ago from Tyler, TX

      This ten-point outline now has a much needed conclusion!

    • MartieCoetser profile image

      Martie Coetser 

      8 years ago from South Africa

      Thank you for the link :))

    • bohemiotx profile imageAUTHOR

      Joffre Meyer 

      8 years ago from Tyler, TX

      Actually I don't know of English classes on the Internet. When I write annotated link pages, I'm looking for other aspects of the English language. Maybe these Grammar/Writing Quizzes from Capital Community College of Hartford, CN will help http://grammar.ccc.commnet.edu/grammar/

    • MartieCoetser profile image

      Martie Coetser 

      8 years ago from South Africa

      English is a beautiful language, but not easy to understand/speak/write for anyone with a different mother-tongue. But I believe English people will say the same of all other languages. I need to take an advance course in English, or perhaps only on intermediate level. I’ve got to get on top of the tenses. Can you recommend a course available on the Internet?

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