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Chemtrails, Chembows and Spectral Analysis

Updated on April 21, 2014
This chembow was photographed over Vancouver just before a sun halo materialized. The two are separate occurrences.
This chembow was photographed over Vancouver just before a sun halo materialized. The two are separate occurrences. | Source

What Fraunhofer Emission Spectra Can Tell Us

Sometimes when a chemtrail and the sun are aligned in the correct configuration, refracted sunlight will create what is known as a chembow. This is not like a known rainbow, nor a sun halo. As a matter of fact, shortly after this phenomenon occurred, a sun halo began to form and it could be seen through the chemtrails. At that time, there was no chembow seen, so we know that the refraction angle of sunlight by ice crystals is not the same angle as reflected sunlight from chembows. Chembows have peculiar colour display as well that is unlike that of a sun halo or a rainbow. Thus, given the specular colour characteristics of a chembow, we can analyze its element and molecular makeup via spectral examination of its emission spectra. This particular chembow had the colour characteristic of a salmon to pinkish red colour.

This is the Fraunhofee emission spectra-graph for aluminum
This is the Fraunhofee emission spectra-graph for aluminum

All elements and molecules have their own particular absorption and emission wavelengths related to the photoelectric effect. No two are the same, which is why we can see what something is made of, light years away or right in our own backyard without having to lay hands on it first and set it up in a lab. Aluminium (2) is no exception and the primary spectrum shows emission, absorption, reflective lines in the red and green region of the spectrum which would give a combined view of a salmon coloured chembow appearance. On some occasions, this may show as red and green together, but no other colour. Now, the general appearance of a lump of aluminium is a silver-grey colour, but the spectral analysis based on the photoelectric effect gives a different picture and this is what we have to rely on for distance analysis by spectroscopy. Spectral analysis would then tell us, that what we are looking at over our heads is a dusting of aluminium as one of the constituents of chemtrails or stratospheric geo-engineering. As these dusts are released at high altitude, they can be more readily ionized by solar radiation, which would cause the effect of Fraunhofer emission due to the photoelectric effect. However, just because the dust is released is no guarantee that there will be ionizing. As aluminium is also highly reflective, one might see a similar effect as refraction in ice; in other words, a full spectrum. There are others that are suggested as well, but the photo above tells us that this particular chemtrail is aluminium dust.

Chemtrails are becoming increasingly abundant and the suggesting is that they are being used as a shield to mask global warming. The trade off is global dimming by some 20% which has a marked effect on agricultural production. There is another trade off in the form of toxification of everything below as the particles settle out eventually or come down in rain and snow as the particles form seeds around which ice or moisture accumulates. All the material in chemtrails eventually reaches the ground and then into plants that we eat and ends up increasing in our bodies due to biological magnifcation.

Not all chembows are the same. This spectacular image is the result of reflection of sunlight off properly aligned nano-particles. They have to align just right to cause the "rainbow" effect
Not all chembows are the same. This spectacular image is the result of reflection of sunlight off properly aligned nano-particles. They have to align just right to cause the "rainbow" effect | Source

The caption on this image reads “A popular chembow image. Notice how only the wispy remnants of the chemtrail diffract the sunlight, not the clouds.” (1) This particular chembow is produced either by a composite of elements due to the complete spectrum of colours or is due to a reflection effect similar to refraction in ice. The fact that the chembow refracts the sunlight, while the clouds do not, is more proof that the refraction angle for clouds and chembows are different.

This Australian Chembow has the signature of aluminum

This is another chembow, this time displaying the Fraunhofer signature for the element barium.
This is another chembow, this time displaying the Fraunhofer signature for the element barium. | Source
This is the Fraunhofer emission spectra for barium.
This is the Fraunhofer emission spectra for barium. | Source

This photo from the same source (1) has the caption “Filamentous wisps may indicate presence of heavier-than-water particulate aerosol. Pink and green dominate the rainbow, matching emission spectra of barium.“ For reference, we include the spectrum of barium. Barium (2) has far more electron energy levels than aluminium and thus will present a much different light show than aluminium dust. It is thus, much more likely to see a more complete “rainbow” effect with this element than with aluminium. With both elements in the dust, this would be a greater certainty.

Aluminium has been cited as being a neurotoxin that is responsible for neurological degenerative diseases in people and animals. Barium is no less a threat as it is highly reactive and can combine with water and other elements to form poisonous substances.

This spectacular sun-dog was photographed near New York less than 48 hours before hurricane Sandy hit.It is not a chembow, though sometimes these events are misidentified as such.
This spectacular sun-dog was photographed near New York less than 48 hours before hurricane Sandy hit.It is not a chembow, though sometimes these events are misidentified as such.
This is part of a sun halo, notoriously difficult to photograph due to their proximity to the sun. These too have been misidentified as chembows.
This is part of a sun halo, notoriously difficult to photograph due to their proximity to the sun. These too have been misidentified as chembows. | Source

Not all phenomenon reported as chembows are actually chembows. Many are quire naturally based, such as sun halos and sun-dogs. These two are caused by ice particles high in the stratosphere and when the sun is close to the horizon, most often during cold weather. To old school weather forecasters, the sun halo such as seen below left, was a presage to a storm. Sun halos like like a rainbow around the sun and are typically located around the sun in whole or part, 22 degrees from the sun itself. Sun halos and their counterpart in moon halos, form from refracted light in ice or water droplets in the upper troposphere, 3 to 6 kilometres up. Sun dogs are a different phenomenon that work by the same principle, except through ice in the stratosphere. These often do not present a rainbow effect and also produce sun like images on either side of the sun, which may or may not show rainbow characteristics. Sun dogs can form either at 22 degrees or 44 degrees and rarely sometimes in both positions. Sun halos and sun-dogs always occur in the same way.

Here we see a photo of the same sun halo through a chemtrail. This is not a chembow, but the same halo as seen above without the chemtrail being present. There is no chembow here.
Here we see a photo of the same sun halo through a chemtrail. This is not a chembow, but the same halo as seen above without the chemtrail being present. There is no chembow here. | Source

The angle of refection of refraction would also vary in chemtrail dust. This is because, the dust is a nanotechnology that is manufactured to be mixed with jet fuel. This tiny particles that are sprayed out with the regular contrails, come out in random orientation. Enough however, will be correctly oriented in order to reflect sunlight and the angle would have to be critical between the sun, the particles and the viewers. No two viewers separated by distance, will see the same effect, but it would vary. This last point is yet to be proved as a coordinated effort would need to be done between viewers in different locations to prove the point. In conditions of ionization, the orientation does not matter and people over different locations would see the same effect despite sun, particle, viewer angle. This too would need to be verified by observation of more than one observer. In the photo above, the sun halo can be seen through the chemtrail, yet there is no refraction, reflection of emission from the chembow. This confirms the different angle required to achieve the reflection from the particles as opposed to that of ice crystals.

Are other substances being used in chemtrails other than aluminium and barium? The answer to that would be the spectral analysis of a particular event. For instance; some folks suggest that Lithium is sometimes used. This element would show up as red only due to its emission properties. Others go so far as to say uranium is also used, but uranium has a complex emission spectrum that approximates a full rainbow effect. In that circumstance, it would be hard to distinguish it from a reflection spectrum that typically show the entire visible spectrum as one would see in refraction from a CD or a DVD disk.

The analysis from chembows can thus be complex as various phenomenon can occur separately if at all. Most chemtrails do not produce chembows at all and the manifestation appears to be rare. When it occurs, it is likely from three possibilities of refraction, reflection and emission and the one that tells us the make up is the spectral emission caused by ionization and the photoelectric effect. Thus, for the most part, we have no way of telling what is in them until the settle out in snow and rain. This can take years and by then, they can settle anywhere the weather drives them.

When they do settle, that is when we ingest the particles by eating them in food, drinking them in water, breathing them in, or absorbing them through the eyes and mucous membranes. Chemtrails particles that are settling, will cause stinging eyes and nasal congestion. It might be difficult to distinguish the symptoms from allergies. Those who do not suffer such conditions, but have the symptoms anyway, may be the simile to the minors canary to alert the rest of us that a chemtrail mist is at ground level. When they do reach the ground, they get into the soil, ice caps and glaciers. Thus as another proof, it would be expedient to mount a mission to Antarctica or the high Himalayan glaciers to collect snow and ice deposits of the last few decades for analysis to calculate the amounts and types of particles being deposited overhead.

Emission spectra of chembows will tell us exactly what is being sprayed overhead and we need to create a massive dossier of evidence in order to pursue legal action where possible to hold those responsible for dispersing known toxins in the stratosphere.

References:

  1. http://chemtrails.cc/2009/01/25/what-are-chembows/

  2. http://chemistry.bd.psu.edu/jircitano/periodic4.html

Chemtrails Hits Main Stream Media

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    • syzygyastro profile imageAUTHOR

      William J. Prest 

      2 years ago from Vancouver, Canada

      I suppose that in regions where there are plenty of chemtrails, there is an increased chance of seeing chembows. They come in different colours that typically follow the spectra of the dispersed elements. Pinkish chembows are barium. Green and red are aluminium. I'm not sure what yours reflects, but it could be a composite. You'd do well to have you local rainwater chemically analysed. Blinding "sundogs" would indicate somerhing extremely reflective or refractive.

    • profile image

      Jennifer Johnson 

      2 years ago

      Chembows are not rare I saw tons of them last year, and this year. Some of them were blinding like the sun. Most of them consisting of blue, green, and orange. Pay attention to the sky on sunrise, and sunset.

    • syzygyastro profile imageAUTHOR

      William J. Prest 

      3 years ago from Vancouver, Canada

      That could go far in explaining why chembows are so rare.

    • profile image

      saddened 

      3 years ago

      you are showing an emission spectra, unless you have heated the chemtrail so much it emits light you wont see that spectra you will see everything apart from those lines which would appear black

    • profile image

      Belfrey 

      4 years ago

      A circumhorizontal arc is not a rainbow. However, I don't see anything like spectrographic lines in the examples you showed. If the cloud is not wide or consistent enough to capture the entire spectrum at that angle, then you'll only get a chunk of it.

    • syzygyastro profile imageAUTHOR

      William J. Prest 

      4 years ago from Vancouver, Canada

      Given the research about the contrails that you cite, it still does not answer the question as to why only a partial spectrum is produced when sunlight is reflected/refracted from the particles. If these were water vapour or ice crystals, then there should be a full spectrum rainbow, which there is not in many cases, suggesting that there is something else in these exhaust fumes. I have downloaded a pdf of the paper you referenced and will study it.

    • profile image

      Belfrey 

      4 years ago

      Contrails can dissipate quickly, or persist for hours and spread as cirrus - it all depends on the atmospheric conditions that the plane is through. This has been observed and documented in everything from pictures and books to the scientific literature for as long as there's been high-altitude aircraft.

      Consider the 1970 paper from the Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences ("Airborne observations of contrail effects on the thermal radiation budget"), stating: "The spreading out of jet contrails into extensive cirrus sheets is a familiar sight. Often, when persistent conditions exist from 25,000 to 40,000 ft, several long contrails increase in number and gradually merge into an almost solid interlaced sheet." There's a lot of scientific literature on the topic, from the 1950s to today.

    • syzygyastro profile imageAUTHOR

      William J. Prest 

      4 years ago from Vancouver, Canada

      The top photo was taken at about 1:30 PM on a summer day in 2013 and does not reflect sunset hues on a contrail. A contrail typically vaporizes in about 30 seconds to a minute, becoming invisible. A chemtrail will last for hours and eventually feather out to become a thin mist like, stratospheric blanket that in some cases, give a clear sky a white hue instead of blue. Sometimes that strange cirrus cloud that has twists and knots instead of the gentle arc of real cirrus clouds are remnants of chemtrials. Cirrus clouds for most areas of the world, presage a warm front moving in that will bring drizzle and light rain. Chemtrial cirrus emulating clouds seldom presage rain of any kind.

    • profile image

      Belfrey 

      4 years ago

      Pardon, yes, I meant the one just below the first spectr0graph. The colors are not very distinct in your contrail photograph; it looks like it might just be catching some sunset hues.

      About the third photograph, you stated, "The fact that the chembow refracts the sunlight, while the clouds do not, is more proof that the refraction angle for clouds and chembows are different." But really those are different types of clouds. The circumhorizontal arc is seen in the upper-level cirrus (ice) clouds. The white puffy clouds there are lower-level cumulus (mostly water droplet) clouds.

    • syzygyastro profile imageAUTHOR

      William J. Prest 

      4 years ago from Vancouver, Canada

      I took the top picture and it was a trail I saw laid down and then it drifted toward the sun and lit up in shades of reddish and green. I happened to have my camera at the ready and snapped the top photo. Perhaps you mean the third photo down.

    • profile image

      Belfrey 

      4 years ago

      Sundogs no, but ice crystals yes. The top picture is a frequently published example of a circumhorizontal arc (which are often called by the misleading term "fire rainbow").

    • syzygyastro profile imageAUTHOR

      William J. Prest 

      4 years ago from Vancouver, Canada

      Not so! Ice crystal halos, aka, sun dogs surround the sun and produce two images of the sun on either side. There may be an upside down rainbow at the top of the halo. Read up on sun dogs and you will see what I mean, Chembows are irregular and so far appear to be relatively rare.

    • profile image

      Fooba 

      4 years ago

      Oh my god... This are simple ice crystal halos!

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