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The Beautiful yet Potentially Deadly Foxglove

Updated on November 11, 2015
Faith Reaper profile image

Theresa finds joy and beauty in gardening. She feels closer to the Lord God when digging her hands into His earth.

Foxgloves

File: Foxgloves in Farmingham - geography.org.uk 191176.jpg Author: Glyn Baker  06-24-06 CC-BY-SA-2.0
File: Foxgloves in Farmingham - geography.org.uk 191176.jpg Author: Glyn Baker 06-24-06 CC-BY-SA-2.0 | Source

Take no Chances by Knowing What Is in Your Garden?


Are you aware that the beautiful flowers, Foxgloves, are poisonous, and can even be deadly?

I was unaware of such until one day in early spring of this year, I was out shopping for unique plants, and I saw the most beautiful flowers, the Foxgloves. They came in various colors and sizes and were just so beautiful; I had to buy some for my garden.

Well, after I purchased the flowers and was leaving the store, a woman came up to me out of the blue and said, “Do you know those are poisonous?” I told her that I did not know that, but wondered; if that is the case, why are they all sitting right outside for anyone or a child to touch? She then went on to mention that if I had small children at my home, it is very dangerous if they touch the flower and then put their hands or fingers in their mouths.

Well, that got me thinking seriously, as I have two granddaughters who visit often. I thought to myself, well, when I get home I will do some research, and sure enough, they are very poisonous and can cause death when inhaled, digested or even nibbled on (by a pet or child).

Believe it or not, the entire plant is very toxic, including the roots, sap, flowers, seeds, pollen, and leaves (even when dried). A lot of people have had reactions merely by just brushing up against the flowers, even the dried leaves. They can cause hives and a swollen throat. It is suggested to take antihistamines for hives.

Please do not take any chances with the beautiful but deadly flowers and destroy any foxgloves you may have in your yard, and pull up the entire plant. Use gloves to protect yourself, and to go the extra mile, where a mask to prevent inhaling any pollen or seeds from the flowers. It is just not worth the risk of death, especially of a child.

The upper leaves of the stem are more dangerous than the lower leaves. They are most toxic just before the seeds ripen. Ingesting only .5 gram dried or 2 grams of fresh leaf is enough to kill a person.

Needless to say, after discovering all of this, I put on gloves and threw the flowers away in a large garbage bag and tied it off.

Just a single foxglove plant can produce over a million seeds. It sows itself prolifically in places you would not think it would do so.

Foxglove may now be found in the wild in a few areas in parts of Oregon, Washington and West Virginia. It can be seen growing along roads and fence rows, in small cleared places, and on the borders of timberland.

The plant was first introduced in America from Europe as an ornamental garden plant.


Resources: en.wikipedia.org; www.squidoo.com

Exquisite Beauty ... Yet ...

File: Foxgloves - geography.org.uk - 467391.jpg Author: Walter Baxter  06-23-07 CC-BY-SA-2.0
File: Foxgloves - geography.org.uk - 467391.jpg Author: Walter Baxter 06-23-07 CC-BY-SA-2.0 | Source

Breast Cancer Awareness

File: Breast Cancer Awareness (263497131).jpg  October 5, 2006   10:51 Author: Jason Meredith CC-BY-2.0
File: Breast Cancer Awareness (263497131).jpg October 5, 2006 10:51 Author: Jason Meredith CC-BY-2.0 | Source

Could Beat Cancer!!!


Ironically, this deadly plant could beat breast cancer!

A drug based on Foxgloves, which produces distinctive tall spires of pink tubular bells in the summer, can dramatically slow the migration of malignant cells to other parts of the body, according to scientists at John Hopkins University, Baltimore.

What is even better, the team at John Hopkins University indicated the medicine is cheap and easily available!

Also, earlier this year, the same team found it could reduce the spread of prostate cancer in men. How amazing!


Resources: www.cancercenter.com; www.medicalnewstoday.com


Stunningly Beautiful ... Yet ...

File:Floxgloves Hillsborough forest - geography.org.uk - 1506838.jpg Author: Albert Bridge 09-25-09 CC-BY-SA-2.0
File:Floxgloves Hillsborough forest - geography.org.uk - 1506838.jpg Author: Albert Bridge 09-25-09 CC-BY-SA-2.0 | Source

More Poisonous Flowers

Source
Source

Other Poisonous Plants

The following plants are also poisonous in some manner. I was surprised at some of these, but knew of others.

The Morning Glory (I was very surprised by this one.)

The Buttercup

The Climbing Nightshade

Jimsonweed

Hydrangeas (Really surprised!)

Chrysanthemums (Surprise to me.)

Raw Rhubarb

Wisteria

Oleander

Poinsettia

English Ivy (Surprised once again)

Philodendrom (Another surprise.)

All of the above-mentioned plants are poisonous in some way, shape or form, and some can even be fatal.. Herbs are a good substitute to grow for inside your home.

© Copyright Faith Reaper, July 26, 2012

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    • RTalloni profile image

      RTalloni 4 years ago from the short journey

      I was very surprised by your foxglove news but your list at the end has me floored and wanting to do more research myself. Thanks!

    • Faith Reaper profile image
      Author

      Faith Reaper 4 years ago from southern USA

      RTalloni - I was very surprised to say the least, especially on some of those last ones, as you stated. It can get very extensive, as certain plants can be poisonous to just certain animals or pets, i.e., like horses. Some animals can eat the same plants and be fine, but then some others cannot. I am more likely now to seek out more information, as I have grandchildren visiting in my home a lot, and I have a dog. Thanks for reading and commenting. In His Love, Faith Reaper

    • glmclendon profile image

      glmclendon 4 years ago

      Faith, you really surprised me with your list. This was full of info and I was surprised at every turn. Thanks for sharing. I have some research to do.

      Stay Well

    • Faith Reaper profile image
      Author

      Faith Reaper 4 years ago from southern USA

      glmclendon, thanks for reading. Oh, this is just a small list, so there are plenty more poisonous plants and flowers out there. I was very surprised, as I have a lot of these in my garden and around my home. Growing up, I always loved the morning glory, as it just grew wild, but I never had a clue it was poisonous. My mother told me long ago about poinsettias being poisonous, so at Christmas, I am sure to place them high to where my grandchildren cannot reach them. God bless you. In His Love, Faith Reaper

    • LaThing profile image

      LaThing 4 years ago from From a World Within, USA

      Wow, this is a shocker!! The only one I knew about was the Poinsettia.... And I also found out after I bought it, AT the store. Someone saw me with my little girl and decided to inform me! I am just surprised that they don't come with warning labels!

      Thanks for the info..... Very useful. Chrysanthemums?? Would never have thought.....

    • Faith Reaper profile image
      Author

      Faith Reaper 4 years ago from southern USA

      LaThing - I was thinking the very same thing about the warning labels, as to exactly how it is poisonous, but they never have any warning on them that I've ever seen. I guess that is not regulated by whomever? It is just so ironic to me that something so beautiful may or can be deadly. Thanks for reading and commenting. I found there are tons of others that are poisonous to some degree to specific animals, i.e., some are to cats, different one are to horses, and then some are to everyone and every living animal. It is very extensive, but if you have pets or children, you should really try to find out before bringing it home. God bless. In His Love, Faith Reaper

    • profile image

      gottabegod 4 years ago

      I was surprised about the Foxglove, as well as disappointed because I had just planted some last year around our pool - guess I'll be pulling it up & discarding it now, I sure don't want the possibility of one of my grandkids getting poisoned!

      This was a very interesting hub, good & helpful information. Thank you Faith!

      God bless!

    • Michele Travis profile image

      Michele Travis 4 years ago from U.S.A. Ohio

      Thank you so much for the information you have given us. Now I know what not to buy when getting flowers for my garden.

      Voted up!

    • mary615 profile image

      Mary Hyatt 4 years ago from Florida

      You wrote a very interesting and informative Hub here. I knew of some of these plants, but not all being poinsonous.

      The Foxglove is a very beautiful flower, too.

      I voted this Hub UP, etc.

    • kashmir56 profile image

      Thomas Silvia 4 years ago from Massachusetts

      Hi my friend great information within this well written hub, some of it i did not know . Thanks for the heads-up on these poisonous plants .

      Well done and vote up and more !!!

    • suzettenaples profile image

      Suzette Walker 4 years ago from Taos, NM

      Thanks for a very informative hub. The only flower I knew to be poisonous (animals only) was the pointsettia. Buttercup - I played with those all the time when I was a child. We would weave them into crowns to wear in our hair. Of course, I never tried to injest one, but still, I had no idea they were poisonous. Thanks for the info! Beautiful but deadly.

    • Faith Reaper profile image
      Author

      Faith Reaper 4 years ago from southern USA

      gottabedgod - oh dear, I am sorry about the disappointment, as they sure are beautiful flowers, but I believe as long as they are not digested in some manner, they may be okay to have towards the back of a garden. But, I would not want to take any chances. Be careful if you do pull them up, as even the pollen or seeds being inhaled or rubbing against your skin could have a bad reaction. It is strange, that the foxglove can also be used to save lives. Thanks for reading. Be safe. In His Love, Faith Reaper

    • Faith Reaper profile image
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      Faith Reaper 4 years ago from southern USA

      Michele - thanks so much for reading. Well, I believe the degree to which it is poisonous makes a difference, as I have Ivy growing all over up and down one side of the brick walls lining my driveway, and it has never bothered anybody or my dog or anything, plus I have hydrangeas and some of the others, but no one has eaten any! Thank goodness for that. I guess if we just use common sense if children are around, etc. If you have a certain kind of pet, you can research what, let's say, the types of plants cats cannot tolerate, etc. In other words, there is plenty more information out there on this subject. God bless. In His Love, Faith Reaper

    • Faith Reaper profile image
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      Faith Reaper 4 years ago from southern USA

      Mary - thanks for reading and for the encouraging comments. I know, I sure do hate that such a beautiful flower can be so deadly. God bless. Be safe in your travels. In His Love, Faith Reaper

    • Faith Reaper profile image
      Author

      Faith Reaper 4 years ago from southern USA

      kashmir, dear friend, thanks so much for the wonderful comments and taking time to read. God bless you. In His Love, Faith Reaper

    • Faith Reaper profile image
      Author

      Faith Reaper 4 years ago from southern USA

      suzettenaples - I, too, knew about the pointsettia, as my mother told me long ago, but I was surprised about the buttercup. But, as you said, you never digested it! I bet the crowns were beautiful weaved out of the buttercup. Thanks so much for reading and commenting. God bless. In His Love, Faith Reaper

      I am sorry I am so late in getting back with everyone on this one, as we have our granddaughters up this weekend, and it always takes a good long time to get them settled down on the first night they are here.

    • Tonipet profile image

      Tonette Fornillos 4 years ago from The City of Generals

      Hello Faith. This is very educational, I was very surprised even Poinsettia, a wonderful Christmas flower along with chrysanthemums, morning glory, and buttercup could be poisonous in some manner. Thank you for this list, I would love to read more about these flowers then. Thanks again, very helpful, saves us all. All the best.

    • Faith Reaper profile image
      Author

      Faith Reaper 4 years ago from southern USA

      Tonipet - Thanks so much for the great comment and stopping to read. I know what you mean about being surprised at most of these, but at least my mother warned me long ago, as I stated above, about the Poinsettia, and of all things,it is a Christmas flower? God bless. In His Love, Faith Reaper

    • teaches12345 profile image

      Dianna Mendez 4 years ago

      I have always admired the beauty of this plan but didn't realize it was toxic. Good information to know! I am even more surprised by the others on the list. Good post and voted up.

    • Faith Reaper profile image
      Author

      Faith Reaper 4 years ago from southern USA

      teaches - thanks so much for your comments. I never had a clue about the foxgloves or many of the others, which were a real surprise to me. God bless. In His Love, Faith Reaper

    • Tonipet profile image

      Tonette Fornillos 4 years ago from The City of Generals

      Thanks Faith. Yes, I grew up with the love of Poinsettias during Christmas. They're usually brightly red in color that is so loved as home décor during and after the holiday season. Try them on Christmas:=) God bless you too, Faith.

    • Faith Reaper profile image
      Author

      Faith Reaper 4 years ago from southern USA

      Tonipet - I love the Poinsettias too, and use them at Christmas, but I just place them up high so my grandchildren cannot reach them. I love the bright red too, but the actually have many colors, which are interesting. Thanks so much for reading and the nice comments. In His Love, Faith Reaper

    • Lord De Cross profile image

      Joseph De Cross 4 years ago

      Extremely surprised to say the least Faith. On the other side of the scope, we find them capable of reducing cancer. This, "slowing the migration of malignant cells to other parts of the body" means a lot for people desperate for a cure. Will be very careful next time. The part that doesn't make sense is the lack of warning from the suppliers and vendors. Thanks for this valuable info my dearest friend.

    • Faith Reaper profile image
      Author

      Faith Reaper 4 years ago from southern USA

      Dearest lord - That is so true, why is there no warning when you purchase the plants! If just baffles me. Makes no sense at all to me either. Yet, at least the foxglove can be used to reduce cancer! Thanks so much for the great comments as always. God bless, In His Love, Faith Reaper

    • The Dirt Farmer profile image

      Jill Spencer 4 years ago from United States

      Really like your hub title and, despite its toxicity, I really love foxglove, too, as do the bees. Only wish our foxglove had reseeded itself as it's a biennial. Enjoyed your hub!

    • Faith Reaper profile image
      Author

      Faith Reaper 4 years ago from southern USA

      The Dirt Farmer - so glad you stopped to read and thanks so much for leaving great comments. In His Love, Faith Reaper

    • Gypsy Rose Lee profile image

      Gypsy Rose Lee 4 years ago from Riga, Latvia

      Thanks for this very interesting and informative hub. Deadly beauty is right. Wonder if the Foxglove and some of the others grow here. I'll have to check this out. Just know I don't have any of them in my garden. Passing this on.

    • Faith Reaper profile image
      Author

      Faith Reaper 4 years ago from southern USA

      Gypsy, thanks so much for reading. I know you have such beautiful flowers and trees in your area around where you live, from all the beautiful photos you have shared in your hubs. Take care and be safe. In His Love, Faith Reaper

    • tobusiness profile image

      Jo Alexis-Hagues 4 years ago from Bedfordshire, U.K

      A lot of these beautiful plants we see simply as ornamental plants, but they have amazing medicinal qualities, the foxglove has been saving lives since it was discovered around the sixteen or seventeen century. Digitalis, an extract from the foxglove, is still use to treat cardiac arrhythmia. A very useful informative hub.

      Faith, well done

    • Faith Reaper profile image
      Author

      Faith Reaper 4 years ago from southern USA

      tobusiness - thanks so much for the additional insightful information about the foxgloves. Very interesting indeed. I appreciate your insight and comments so very much. God bless you. In His Love, Faith Reaper

    • unknown spy profile image

      IAmForbidden 4 years ago from Neverland - where children never grow up.

      Wow, I'm really surprised, honestly. I didn't even know those flowers are poisonous..wow amazing..learning new things everyday.

    • Faith Reaper profile image
      Author

      Faith Reaper 4 years ago from southern USA

      unknown spy, I did not either, and I bought them! I sure did hate to have to get rid of them, but they are truly deadly, in that, if a child, rubs it fingers against the pollen or seeds and then places their fingers int theirs mouths, very bad. Thanks for reading. God bless. In His Love, Faith Reaper

    • pstraubie48 profile image

      Patricia Scott 4 years ago from sunny Florida

      This is really an important article for all to read. Knowing the dangers that lurk behind the lovelies in our yards is critical especially with small children so eager to pluck blooms from our plants. And, our sweet pets that may ingest something toxic.

      My Mother always had foxglove in our flower beds when I was growing up but as I remember she had them on the back row of the beds nearest our house. She knew so much that I wish I had journaled all she shared.

      Thank you, Faith Reaper, again for giving us this information. Voted up, useful, and pinned.

    • Faith Reaper profile image
      Author

      Faith Reaper 4 years ago from southern USA

      pstraubie, thanks so much for the encouraging comments. I was very surprised to find this out myself. It is suggested, if you do have foxgloves, to have them in the very back of your garden so children cannot easily get to them. Thanks for the pin. Your mother sounds like she was a great gardner. Thank you so much for stopping to read. God bless you. In His Love, Faith Reaper

    • sgbrown profile image

      Sheila Brown 4 years ago from Southern Oklahoma

      I just added Foxglove to my flower garden this year! My grandchildren don't get around my flower gardens too much and I am always with them when they do. I will have to keep a close eye on them from now on. Thank you for your great information!

    • Faith Reaper profile image
      Author

      Faith Reaper 4 years ago from southern USA

      sgbrown, thanks for reading and just be careful with those sweet grandchildren. In His Love, Faith Reaper

    • CMHypno profile image

      CMHypno 4 years ago from Other Side of the Sun

      Beautiful flowers, but as you say toxic. Even plants have ways to defend themselves and quite often in the natural world bright colours are a sign that the plant, insect or reptile is poisonous

    • Faith Reaper profile image
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      Faith Reaper 4 years ago from southern USA

      CMHypno - Great and very interesting points you have made!!!! Thanks so much for reading and leaving awesome comments. In His Love, Faith Reaper

    • CloudExplorer profile image

      Mike Pugh 4 years ago from New York City

      Very interesting and useful hub to help folks become much more aware of their environment, and in dealing with such lethal poisonous plants, flowers etc...

      Are there any lethal roses that you know of, because I would surely like to know of such if there's in fact any, now that would truly be surprising. Imagine being given a dozen wild deadly roses by someone trying to serenade you, and you go to smell them, and yikes that is a scary thought indeed.

      Voted up as scary, I mean awesome, and interesting for sure. Nice one Faith, by your friendly neighborhood cloud dude!

    • Faith Reaper profile image
      Author

      Faith Reaper 4 years ago from southern USA

      CloudExplorer - so great to see you and thanks so much for reading.

      LOL - No, roses are not poisonous, so you still have to lavish your sweetie with sweet roses - they are even edible and the rose water is healthy! Who would have thought? So, you cannot use that excuse for not buying roses. Ha. Thanks for leaving your unique, CloudExplorer, comments -so funny and sweet at the same time. God bless. In His Love, Faith Reaper

    • stars439 profile image

      stars439 4 years ago from Louisiana, The Magnolia and Pelican State.

      Thank you for this informative, yet colorful, and beautiful hub. GBY.

    • Faith Reaper profile image
      Author

      Faith Reaper 4 years ago from southern USA

      stars - thanks for stopping to read and comment. God bless. In His Love, Faith Reaper

    • maggs224 profile image

      maggs224 4 years ago from Sunny Spain

      This is a very interesting and informative hub I learned something new today thank you for the warning :D

    • Faith Reaper profile image
      Author

      Faith Reaper 4 years ago from southern USA

      Hi maggie, so great to see you here visiting from Sunny Spain. It has been raining here today, which is much needed. I appreciate your kind comments. Have a blessed day in the Lord. In His Love Always, Faith Reaper

    • Deborah Brooks profile image

      Deborah Brooks Langford 4 years ago from Brownsville,TX

      these flowers are so beautiful and so deadly.. wow /faith.. I don't know how I ever missed this wonderful hub..

      Merry Christmas my friend

      Debbie

    • moonlake profile image

      moonlake 4 years ago from America

      They used this flower in the old days to poison people. It is so pretty and I love the way they look but don't have any in my garden..My dog ate philodendrom one time and she had to be taken to the vet, she was ok. I still have philodendrom but they go up high. Voted up on your interesting hub.

    • ComfortB profile image

      Comfort Babatola 4 years ago from Bonaire, GA, USA

      Who knew? I've always admired these beauties, but never thought they were deadly.

      Very informative hub. Voted up and useful. Will share.

    • profile image

      lovedoctor926 4 years ago

      The Foxgloves is indeed a very beautiful flower. I didn't know that it was poisonous. I'm surprised that the Poinsettia is listed there as well. I was thinking the same thing. if they're poisonous, why would they be sitting outside for the children to touch? I'm wondering if the people at the store are even aware that these flowers are poisonous. This is good to know. Voting up useful and interesting.

    • Faith Reaper profile image
      Author

      Faith Reaper 4 years ago from southern USA

      Thanks Debbie!

      So glad you stopped by to read about the lovely, but deadly foxglove flower. I was so surprised too, but I am so thankful that woman told me of such and I went right home and researched it. It is true!!! Scary that they just had them sitting out there, as any child could walk right past and touch them!

      God bless. Merry Christmas my dear friend. In His Love, Faith Reaper

    • profile image

      oceansider 4 years ago

      Thank you Faith for this article....and I didn't know that any of these flowers are poisonous...I am so glad I red your hub.

      God bless you, Helen

    • Faith Reaper profile image
      Author

      Faith Reaper 4 years ago from southern USA

      Hi Moonlake,

      Wow, now that is pretty scary that they used it to poison people back in the day!!! So, it is surely a "deadly beauty" no doubt! I am so sorry about your dog and the other plant, but glad she is okay! Thank goodness. I appreciate the votes and the kind words.

      In His Love, Faith Reaper

    • Faith Reaper profile image
      Author

      Faith Reaper 4 years ago from southern USA

      ComfortB,

      So glad for your visit here! I, too, have always love their beauty, but was clueless as to how dangerous these beauties are really.

      Thank you so much for sharing.

      God bless. In His Love, Faith Reaper

    • Faith Reaper profile image
      Author

      Faith Reaper 4 years ago from southern USA

      Hi Helen,

      So great to see you commenting here! Thank you so much for the kind comments. I was so surprised myself to say the least. However, I am very grateful to the woman who was kind enough to tell me!!! Just glad to help to make people aware of such, as I was unaware myself.

      God bless. In His Love, Faith Reaper

    • Faith Reaper profile image
      Author

      Faith Reaper 4 years ago from southern USA

      Hi lovedoctor!

      So great to see you commenting here. Yes, I was very surprised to say the least, and they are so very attractive, and that is the very reason for them to at least have a warning sign or something protective around them. I knew about the Poinsettia being poisonous, as my mother told me a long time ago, and that still amazes me too! I have them around my home at Christmas, but I just place them up high so my grandchildren will not be harmed or pets, etc.

      I appreciate your comments here. I am using my daughter's laptop right now to comment, as my computer is being re-formatted.

      God bless. In His Love, Faith Reaper

    • janshares profile image

      Janis Leslie Evans 4 years ago from Washington, DC

      Hi Faith! This is a great hub, so original and useful. How come a disclaimer didn't come with that deadly beautiful plant when you bought it? Or with others for that matter?! Thank you for informing us. Voted up, useful, and interesting. My clumsy finger on my kindle hit 'vote down' first so I think I erased it by back arrowing and starting over. See ya later.

    • Faith Reaper profile image
      Author

      Faith Reaper 4 years ago from southern USA

      Hi janshares!

      So appreciate your visit here to the "deadly" garden. Yes . . . how come indeed!!! I wondered the very same thing, maybe I am assuming they just wanted to sell them and make money, back to that age-old problem of greed?

      Thanks so much for the votes

      Sorry for the late comment, as last night my husband had our email service to check into why I have been having so much trouble logging into emails, etc., and it was only supposed to take two hours, but it had taken all night long, and then the day before my husband reformatted our computer. So, I have been off and on the past couple of days.

      I appreciate you kind words here and appreciate the visit.

      God bless. In His Love, Faith Reaper

    • Jackie Lynnley profile image

      Jackie Lynnley 3 years ago from The Beautiful South

      Wow, go figure! I have many of these and how easy would it be to get this inside the mouth! Maybe that explains those belly aches that come on sometimes out of the blue that really come from nothing? Food for thought! Thank you very much. Up and sharing.

    • James-wolve profile image

      Tijani Achamlal 3 years ago from Morocco

      Oh that s dangerous for kids .I wonder why florists sell such poisonous flowers .I think authority should forbid selling them.Those flowers should be sent only to labs.

      Tons of hugs and much love to you,

      James

    • Lastheart profile image

      Maria Magdalena Ruiz O'Farrill 3 years ago from Borikén the great land of the valiant and noble Lord

      This was such a nutritious lecture for my intellect. I love knowing about these nature treasures information. Great hub!

    • Faith Reaper profile image
      Author

      Faith Reaper 3 years ago from southern USA

      Oh, my precious friend, Jackie,

      Please do not touch them without gloves on or be around them without a mask on... please!!! I hope you have them planted at the back of your garden against a tall fence, with smaller plants thick in front of them, so they are hard to get to by children and pets, especially!

      I cannot imagine the thought of you being harmed in any way or worse, sweetie. I will pray for your protection from these deadly beauties.

      I appreciate the vote up and especially share here, for it seems, according to the poll and comments, a lot are not aware of such, just as I was not aware. Isn't it ironic, though, they help cure breast cancer!

      Hugs, Faith Reaper

    • Faith Reaper profile image
      Author

      Faith Reaper 3 years ago from southern USA

      Oh, is right, James, and a big OH!

      I know, and I came close to having them right there where my granddaughters play outside! I know that lady, who came up to me out of nowhere after I had purchased them, must have been an angel of the Lord. If I had planted them, I know my precious granddaughters would have been so attracted to their beauty and would have wanted to touch them and pick them. They love to plant flowers with me, and then pick them right after : ) ... And you know that children tend to put their fingers in their mouths, but apparently just inhaling or even brushing up against them can be either deadly or harmful in some manner.

      I thought that very thing, when the woman told me, and I really did not believe her and brought them home anyway, due to that very fact, the place from where I purchased them, just had them sitting around on the ground in buckets all over the place! And my eye of course was immediately drawn to them for their sheer beauty!

      I agree, send them to the lab to help in the cure of breast cancer, which is so ironic.

      So nice for your visit here this day to the deadly, but beautiful garden.

      Aw, you are sweet ... tons of hugs and love to you too, from southern USA,

      Faith Reaper

    • Faith Reaper profile image
      Author

      Faith Reaper 3 years ago from southern USA

      Hi Lastheart,

      I love your interesting hubber name, and I am so glad you have stopped here to read and leave interesting and generous comments indeed!

      God bless, Faith Reaper

    • Anil and Honey profile image

      Anil 3 years ago from Kerala

      Hai dear,

      I can't see find a word for describing the beauty of the hub, very nice very beautiful and very heart touching dear ... thank and I waiting like this again

    • Romeos Quill profile image

      Romeos Quill 3 years ago from Lincolnshire, England

      Dearest faith Reaper

      A very useful, and potentially life-saving Hub article you've spotlighted here, so thank you for your astuteness in placing it prominently on your page.

      When I worked in the medical field a few years ago, I learned that foxglove was used to make ' digitalis ', which is a very useful medicine to control erratic heart conditions, especially atrial fibrillation, although your revelation of it potentially curing certain cancers is astounding.

      I sincerely hope you and your family are well today, and that good news will soon be coming your way regarding your grand-daughter.

      Thank you, and definitely sharing .

      With Warmest Regards,

      R.Q.

    • Faith Reaper profile image
      Author

      Faith Reaper 3 years ago from southern USA

      Hello Anil and Honey,

      Thank you for your visit here and I appreciate your kind comments. I am glad you liked this hub.

      Blessings, Faith Reaper

    • Faith Reaper profile image
      Author

      Faith Reaper 3 years ago from southern USA

      Hi Dear Romeos,

      Always so lovely when you stop in for a visit! Oh, how very interesting as to your previous work in the medical field and their use of the foxgloves! That is certainly very fascinating indeed. I guess all things can be used for good or bad, depending.

      Oh, yes, thank you for asking about my family. We are well, and only time will tell about all and, so, until then we will continue to place our faith and trust in the Lord to heal.

      I appreciate you and hope you are doing well this day too.

      Hugs and love from southern USA, Faith Reaper

    • DDE profile image

      Devika Primić 3 years ago from Dubrovnik, Croatia

      Deadly Beauty Could Be Waiting in Your Garden such beautiful flowers but are so threatening to ones life, a very helpful hub to all readers. I enjoyed learning more about poisonous beauties. Never judge a book by its cover!

      A useful, interesting, and a voted up for his hub.

    • Faith Reaper profile image
      Author

      Faith Reaper 3 years ago from southern USA

      Hi Devika (DDE),

      I am so sorry for the delay in commenting, as my computer has been down for a couple of days. It could go down again any minute now. I know I have missed out reading a lot of great hubs, including yours and hope to catch up this day!

      I am so glad to see you here reading of the deadly but so beautiful flowers. I am thankful to the woman who came up to me in the parking lot and informed me of such, especially being with my grandchildren up so often!

      So true, never judge a book by its cover! Amen on that one!

      Thank you so much for the votes up.

      Blessings,

      Faith Reaper

    • The Examiner-1 profile image

      The Examiner-1 3 years ago

      Hello Faith Reaper,

      This was very informative for me. I did not know that foxglove, or any of the others mentioned, were poisonous. I am not a gardener now but I used to be many years ago and I hope that I did not use foxglove (or the others) in it. I have not had any symptoms of the diseases mentioned by you or the video.

      Love and blessings,

      Kevin

    • Faith Reaper profile image
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      Faith Reaper 3 years ago from southern USA

      Hello Kevin (The Examiner),

      I do so hope you did not have any of these dangerous plants in your garden years ago, especially the floxglove. I am thankful you are fine! I am glad you found this hub to be informative. In my previous yard in the city, I had plenty of Oleanders plants (poisonous too) which grew so wide and tall all around our pool, but thankfully no one was harmed!

      I appreciate you reading.

      Love and blessings to you too,

      Faith Reaper

    • LadyFiddler profile image

      Joanna Chandler 3 years ago from On planet Earth

      WAW!! Very interesting Faith , indeed they are beautiful no one will think such harm can come from its innocency . I am glad you got rid of it , i find you took long i was leaving it at the store or throwing it away on my way home. It reminds me of a physic nuts experience with some kids , parents almost met five of them dead from eating it. Would have been very tragic but God gives his angels charge over us. Luckily they survived.

      Thanks for sharing

      Have a bless weekend.

    • Faith Reaper profile image
      Author

      Faith Reaper 3 years ago from southern USA

      Hi Jo (LadyFiddler),

      Yes, I did not know what to think and wanted to research more right when I arrived home, and it was true! I never want to take any chances, especially when I have children around. He certainly does, praise Him.

      Hope your weekend was lovely.

    • poetryman6969 profile image

      poetryman6969 2 years ago

      I did not know about morning glory. Voted up, interesting and useful.

    • Faith Reaper profile image
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      Faith Reaper 2 years ago from southern USA

      Hello poetryman,

      Thank you for reading even though this is not poetry. I always loved and still do, the morning glories, but did not have a clue growing up that they are poisonous.

      I appreciate the vote up and more.

      Peace and blessings

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