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Interest Inventory/Survey for Students

Updated on August 6, 2013

By Natasha Hoover

Student interest inventory tips and example.
Student interest inventory tips and example. | Source

The Importance of an Interest Inventory for Students

If you can make connections with your students and their world, you can help them become better, more motivated, higher achieving students. Getting to know your students at the beginning of the semester is vital to creating a positive classroom atmosphere that fosters learning. Your subject area and grade level are irrelevant - everyone needs to take time out of the first day of class to take an interest inventory. Later in the semester, this vital information can help you bring disengaged students back to the classroom and assist them in achieving their personal bests.

Have you conducted an interest inventory before?

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What is an Interest Inventory?

An interest inventory is a simple questionnaire to determine what your students enjoy and what their lives are like. It can help you figure out both what they like and what other demands they have on their time. As much as teachers would like to imagine their class is the only thing a student has to spend his or her time on, it simply isn't true. By high school, many students not only have higher level classes, but also juggle sports, clubs, jobs, and their social lives. Some are even the main providers and caretakers at home! This discontent between being seen as a providing adult at home and a 'child' at school can cause them to rebel in class, even though they are perfectly capable students. In order to glean as much information as possible, the inventory should mix fun and serious questions in a non-threatening manner.

What activities are taking away from your student's study time?
What activities are taking away from your student's study time? | Source

How to Write an Interest Inventory

There are several key elements to a successful interest inventory:

  • Make it user friendly. Try to keep it to only one page (front and back) and make it look less intimidating by increasing the font size on the heading and/or using different fonts.
  • Make sure to leave enough space for the students to write!
  • Mix up the questions. Don't put all the serious ones in a row and all the fun ones in a row!
  • Cover a variety of bases by including questions from each of these categories: your content area, the student's interests, and the student's background.

If a student reports attending four other schools and is the youngest if five siblings, s/he may feel a little like the washed up, upside-down duck!
If a student reports attending four other schools and is the youngest if five siblings, s/he may feel a little like the washed up, upside-down duck! | Source
  • Make questions that seem innocuous but can tell you a lot. For example, asking "What is the furthest point away from home you've visited?" seems like a fun question, but it can tell you potentially tell you about the student's worldview and economic life.
  • You must include a short statement saying they do not have to answer questions that make them feel uncomfortable. This is a legal necessity. However, you do not have to emphasize this fact (and I advise you do not emphasize it or you may get a bunch of blank sheets back from students who don't feel like filling it out!).

You should design your own interest inventory to match the grade level of your students, but you are more than welcome to use this interest inventory for inspiration. I don't mind if you want to just use my inventory, but I think personalizing the interest inventory to suit your students is best!

Sample Student Interest Inventory for High School

Student Interest Survey

Please answer all the questions to the best of your ability. You may skip answers that make you uncomfortable.

Name

Grade

Birthday

Home address

Phone number

Do you live with your parents, grandparents, or a guardian?

What is your favorite subject in school? Your least favorite subject?

What do you not like about your least favorite subject?

What is your least favorite part of studying history?

What other schools have you attended?

Do you have any brothers or sisters? How many, and are they older or younger than you?

Do you have a computer and internet connection at home, or do you use the school media center's computers?

What kind of job do you want after high school?

What is a recent movie you enjoyed and why did you like it?

What is the furthest point away from home you've visited?

If you could go back in time, what advice would you give yourself two years ago?

Do you like to play sports, watch them, or both? What sport is your favorite?

What celebrity or athlete do you admire and why?

What teams or clubs do you belong to?

What two activities are you most likely to do after school?

What is your favorite TV show?

What is a responsibility you have?

How would you describe your best friend?

How would your best friend describe you?

Where do you like to hang out with your friends?

If you have the time, I highly recommend conducting a reading inventory, too. No matter your subject area, your students will have to read, and probably write. Teaching literacy should be a part of every class, not just English. You can help your students this semester and beyond by teaching them how to be more proficient readers, writers, and speakers.

Putting an Interset Inventory to Use

These simple questions can help you learn a lot about your students, their home lives, their personalities, and their obligations. You don't have to use them the first week of school - file them away and keep them on hand. In addition to the practical information, an interest inventory gives you doors you can open later in the semester to better access the student. For instance, if a student of yours seems totally checked out in class, look to see what his or her favorite TV show or actor or whoever is. Watch a few episodes of the show or read up on the person and then use this show/person as an example in class or ask the student's opinion about a recent episode or an upcoming movie. It is amazing how much more attention a student will pay if s/he feels connected and listened to! It sounds a little cheesy, but for some students an interested adult piquing their interest in school could literally be a life-altering event (in a very positive way).

It is never too late to conduct an interest inventory. The first week of school is the best time, but you know the saying "better late than never." It is never too late to improve your classroom and the academic lives of your students, even if it's the last day of class!

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    • billybuc profile image

      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      I love this exercise and have used it at the beginning of the year for each one of my eighteen years. It is a great way to get to know your students. Well done, Natasha!

    • hawaiianodysseus profile image

      Hawaiian Odysseus 4 years ago from Southeast Washington state

      Hi, Natasha!

      This is too significant and beautiful a hub to not make mention of one thing you can change ASAP...the spelling of the word just below the pencil in the photo above. There's a huge difference between that word and the word you intended. : ) Thank you for taking this feedback in the spirit in which it was sent.

      Aloha!

      Joe

    • Natashalh profile image
      Author

      Natasha 4 years ago from Hawaii

      Ahahaha Hawaiiandysseus! I kept staring at that picture feeling like something was wrong before I posted it, but I just couldn't figure out what! Thanks so much for confirming my suspicions!

      Thanks, Billybuc! I'm glad you put them to good use.

    • agusfanani profile image

      agusfanani 4 years ago from Indonesia

      Very useful tips, Natasha. I sometimes make a practical inventory of my student interests by compiling their opinions about convenient learning process they expect me to do as a teacher, and that really helps a lot in doing my job. Thank you for sharing this useful, interesting hub.

    • Natashalh profile image
      Author

      Natasha 4 years ago from Hawaii

      That sounds a bit like a study questionnaire, which I also think is important! So many people spend years and years in school without actually thinking about how they study. (Or being taught how!) Thanks for stopping in!

    • teaches12345 profile image

      Dianna Mendez 4 years ago

      This is a great way to open a school year. It helps students to get to know each other and the teacher quickly. Wonderful exercise and thanks for the suggestion. Voted up++

    • Natashalh profile image
      Author

      Natasha 4 years ago from Hawaii

      Thanks so much! I know the school year is winding down now, but I hope some people decide to include it in their fall plans - I know I'll me doing something like this in August!

    • phdast7 profile image

      Theresa Ast 4 years ago from Atlanta, Georgia

      Hi Natasha - I never had a formal name for it, but I do something similar in most of my classes. Knowing a little something about the students helps me to shape the course in little ways that make it more helpful and more appealing. Great Hub. Sharing. Theresa

    • Natashalh profile image
      Author

      Natasha 4 years ago from Hawaii

      Thank you for sharing! I didn't know for a long time that it had a name. It's cool you do it at the collegiate level - I think too many people don't take time to know college students and feel like constant straight up lecture is the only valid teaching technique in college.

    • gypsumgirl profile image

      gypsumgirl 3 years ago from Vail Valley, Colorado

      Thank you for sharing your thoughts around student interest surveys. I agree that getting to know students is the best thing a teacher can do. It's all about the relationships.

    • Natashalh profile image
      Author

      Natasha 3 years ago from Hawaii

      I remember how great it felt the first time a student stayed after class to ask me a question not directly related to that class. I really felt like I'd somehow 'made it' as a teacher because this student believed I had the answer to his question. It was pretty cool! I credit taking the time to learn about students and who they are.

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